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I have been transcribing several wills over the last few months and am pretty much done. However, at the end of the wills, after the names of the witnesses there are letters that I think are shorthand for something but I can't work out what! I'm hoping you guys can help! The words/letters I can't make out are shown as [...] in my transcriptions.

This first picture is from Thomas Linley Seniors will and these are the words I can make out: Proved at London the 12t day of Febry 1817 before The Worshipful Richd Henry Creswell Dr of Laws and Surrogate by the Oath of Mary Linley Widow the relict and other Executor to whom a [...] was granted having own first sworn duty to admr . enter image description here

This is a small section from Mary Linley's will (the above's wife) which reads: in their consciences believe the said names "Mary Linley" so sit and subscribed to the said two codicils respectively to have been written by and with the proper hand of the aforesaid Mary Linley deceased Rill Barnard, George Attwooll. Same day the said Robert Markland Barnard and George Attwooll were duly sworn to the truth of this affidavit before me John Danbery Jun […] Jun Gio [?Crickett] Noty Pub.
enter image description here

edited to add in new words from comments

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2 Answers 2

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I know little about legal matters, but can help with the handwriting:

Same day the said Robert Markland Barnard and George Attwooll were duly sworn to the truth of this affidavit before me John Danber[r?]y Sun prest Jno Geo Crickett Noty Pub.

The first letter after the name Danber[r?]y is certainly an S, not a J. Compare this letter to the S in the word "Same" two lines above. That makes Sun, not Jun, so probably Sun[day].

The following word looks like prest (compare it to "proper"): so, pres[en]t? Pres[iden]t?

After that, not Jun, but Jno, by the looks of it. Jno = John?

Finally, Geo, not Gio, so Geo[rge]. (Compare to the fully written out "George" above.) Have a look at the the letter e throughout the document; you'll see that it consists of a downward curve and a disconnected crossbar. In this case the crossbar is overlapping the o. It is not an i, for what looks like it would be the dot of an i is actually the top serif of the G (compare to the other capital C's and G's).


EDIT :

When I wrote that Sun was probably Sunday, I had in mind that the date was being written out in full, given the earlier guess of "Jun", and that "prest" looked at first like it might be the day of the month. Looking back, I don't see why it would be Sunday, and I'm not sure if it is even "Sun" (although it definitely starts with an S).

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Thanks! That's really helpful! I'm almost done! Excited! There are a few more pictures that I need to add, but I'll add them to a new thread! Thanks for your help! –  BeckyG Jul 21 at 16:59
    
My pleasure! Also please see the note that I just added. –  Théophile Jul 21 at 20:30
    
Ok well I'll keep digging. It looks to me like it says Sun now you mention it, and the second word is definitely prest. I've heard a search on the web and it looks like prest could sometimes mean 'priest'... but that doesn't really help much! I'll let you know if I find anything helpful! –  BeckyG Jul 23 at 9:51
    
Just had a thought: could it be snr? For senior? So snr prest: senior priest? Would priests be witnessing the signing of the affidavit? –  BeckyG Jul 23 at 10:11
    
Good question; "senior priest" had also come to my mind, but that letter really doesn't look like an r, and I'm not sure about priest. I looked into prest also when first writing this up, and the pages that said it could stand for priest seemed to be for another language (Dutch, if I recall). What about Sim for Simon? –  Théophile Jul 23 at 14:29

The first one can be extended to:

Proved at London the 12t day of Febry 1817 before The Worshipful Richd Henry Creswell Dr of Laws and Surrogate by the Oath of Mary Linley Widow the relict and other Executor to whom a [??] was granted having own first sworn duty to admr .

"The Worshipful" here indicates that Richard Henry Creswell was some sort of magistrate as well as a Dr of Laws.

John Danbery Jun […] Jun Gio [?Crickett] Noty Pub.

That is, notary public. I think the rest of this might refer to a "Cirkutt", i.e. circuit, the travelling court, but I'm not 100% sure.

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thanks! That is great with the first one - nice to finally fill in some of those gaps! I'll need to look into the travelling court, but I'm fairly sure that says Crickett and not Cirkutt ... there seem to be too many lines for cirkutt! –  BeckyG Jul 21 at 12:08

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