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Just adding one detail to Jan Murphy's extremely thorough research guide, I think it's worth specifically mentioning probate records and deeds.

Although not electronically indexed, FamilySearch's Tennessee probate records include Greene County wills starting in 1828 (and apparently some back to 1810). Will book #1 includes wills for a John Harmon (filed Nov 1838) and Jacob Harmon (filed Jan 1844). This Jacob Harmon's will lists sons Jacob Jr. and John, and several daughters (with married names), but no son Henry. If this isn't the same Jacob Harman, it may still be possible to assemble enough data about this MarmonHarmon family to eliminate them from other records.

Also, if you can locate (or have someone locate) the deeds for Jacob and Henry Harman's properties, the information about who they were purchased from (and who Jacob's property was eventually sold to) may provide useful family clues.

Just adding one detail to Jan Murphy's extremely thorough research guide, I think it's worth specifically mentioning probate records and deeds.

Although not electronically indexed, FamilySearch's Tennessee probate records include Greene County wills starting in 1828 (and apparently some back to 1810). Will book #1 includes wills for a John Harmon (filed Nov 1838) and Jacob Harmon (filed Jan 1844). This Jacob Harmon's will lists sons Jacob Jr. and John, and several daughters (with married names), but no son Henry. If this isn't the same Jacob Harman, it may still be possible to assemble enough data about this Marmon family to eliminate them from other records.

Also, if you can locate (or have someone locate) the deeds for Jacob and Henry Harman's properties, the information about who they were purchased from (and who Jacob's property was eventually sold to) may provide useful family clues.

Just adding one detail to Jan Murphy's extremely thorough research guide, I think it's worth specifically mentioning probate records and deeds.

Although not electronically indexed, FamilySearch's Tennessee probate records include Greene County wills starting in 1828 (and apparently some back to 1810). Will book #1 includes wills for a John Harmon (filed Nov 1838) and Jacob Harmon (filed Jan 1844). This Jacob Harmon's will lists sons Jacob Jr. and John, and several daughters (with married names), but no son Henry. If this isn't the same Jacob Harman, it may still be possible to assemble enough data about this Harmon family to eliminate them from other records.

Also, if you can locate (or have someone locate) the deeds for Jacob and Henry Harman's properties, the information about who they were purchased from (and who Jacob's property was eventually sold to) may provide useful family clues.

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source | link

Just adding one detail to Jan Murphy's extremely thorough research guide, I think it's worth specifically mentioning probate records and deeds.

Although not electronically indexed, FamilySearch's Tennessee probate records include Greene County wills starting in 1828 (and apparently some back to 1810). Will book #1 includes wills for a John Harmon (filed Nov 1838) and Jacob Harmon (filed Jan 1844). This Jacob Harmon's will lists sons Jacob Jr. and John, and several daughters (with married names), but no son Henry. If this isn't the same Jacob Harman, it may still be possible to assemble enough data about this Marmon family to eliminate them from other records.

Also, if you can locate (or have someone locate) the deeds for Jacob and Henry Harman's properties, the information about who they were purchased from (and who Jacob's property was eventually sold to) may provide useful family clues.