7

What I know so far from family sources: My great-grandfather August Masur was polish, and a soldier within the German Army. He surrender to French troops and was made prisoner. Likely he did this on purpose because he didn't want to fight for Germany, but that's a rumour. Very likely this happened at the start phase of the war, in the war of movement, before there was trenches.

He was prisoner in Brittany and was had very good detention conditions. When the war was over, he came to Switzerland and never returned home ever again.

What I figured out from How to find information on German soldiers from World War I and World War II? is that, even though he had an amazing number of namesakes in the German army, I found a card that very likely is his, because his birthdate is noted at the bottom.

Note that a namesake born on the same day is not to be excluded. However, the sheet referenced by this card mentions a prison transfer between two different Brittonian localities, which makes it even more likely that this is my great-grandfather's card.

enter image description here

It appears I can find the regiment he was fighting for: 113th Infantry, 11th company.

I could not find a definitive entry for him in the list of losses (verlurslisten in German language). However, I found an entry that could be him on page 3446. His name and birthplace are severely misspelt (Massur instead of Masur, Schmitzach instead of Schmitsch), but the Company and Infantry numbers seem to match.

What is even stranger is that all the other solders in this page seems to be from Baden, the southwest region of Germany, the region closest to Switzerland, and not at all where he grew up.

Could it be that my great-grandfather was domiciled in that region before the war?

What is missing:

I still have no idea if the entry mentioned above is really him, I have no idea where he lived before the war (most definitely not at home anymore). I don't know why he didn't return home after the war, but instead came to Switzerland with his older brother.

6

The 113th infantry regiment was from Baden (Freiburg im Breisgau).

The garrison for the 113th infantry regiment can be looked up online, e.g. in GenWiki or in the literature ( Das 5. Badische Infanterie-Regiment Nr. 113 im Weltkriege 1914/18 Oldenburg/Berlin 1925; Udo von Rundstedt: Das 5. Badische Infanterie-Regiment Nr. 113 im Weltkriege 1914/18 Ratzeburg 1933.).

We can easily check more details online, as documents on soldiers fighting in the Baden military were not destroyed during WW II:

| improve this answer | |
  • @Bregalad You can easily look up the garrison for the 113th infantry regiment, either e.g. in GenWiki or in the literature ( Das 5. Badische Infanterie-Regiment Nr. 113 im Weltkriege 1914/18 Oldenburg/Berlin 1925; Udo von Rundstedt: Das 5. Badische Infanterie-Regiment Nr. 113 im Weltkriege 1914/18 Ratzeburg 1933.). The link (now corrected) shows the military record of August Masur. You have to determine if this person is identical to your relative using the information given there (parents, occupation, place and death of birth). – lejonet Jan 17 '16 at 20:46
  • 1
    Yes it's him, you are awesome!! It's sad the handwriting is so illegible. – Bregalad Jan 17 '16 at 20:53
  • Acording to the register he was still living home (i.e. Wohnort in German language). What was he doing in the Baden army? – Bregalad Jan 17 '16 at 21:13
  • @Bregalad Well, according to the entry he already joint the unit in October 1912. It remains confusing. Doesn't the last line on the first page say "Entlassung nach Schmitsch"? Has the Swiss place he moved to some "Melderegister" or other local registry for people living there? – lejonet Jan 18 '16 at 15:05

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.