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I'm looking for information on the surname Lyskowinski in Poland. I know he came on a ship named Northumber that departed from London, England and arrived in America on Aug. 23, 1852. His place of birth was Łódź, Poland on Dec 24, 1831. I can't find any documents on the surname in Poland and don't know how or where to look.

  • Welcome to G&FH SE! Do you have a source for his immigration information that you can post as part of your question? If so, there is an edit button beneath your question that you can use to add it. – PolyGeo May 2 '16 at 3:35
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    Hi, welcome to G&FH.SE! The Illinois State Genealogical Society has a webinar coming up on Polish Immigration to America by Stephen Szabados on May 10 -- the live broadcast is free to the public. Details here: ilgensoc.org If you can catch this presentation, it may give you background information that will help you. – Jan Murphy May 2 '16 at 16:33
  • Very likely it was Łyskowiński. A 'n' before "ski" is always wet, and the "Lys" letter combination is rare, while "Łys" is a common begining on the List of common polish surnames. I wouldn't be surprised if it was Łyszkowiński, it sounds more natural. As with all names in -ski, the feminine form is -ska, obviously. – Bregalad May 6 '16 at 11:52
  • Antoni Lyskowinski (Łyskowinski, son of Kacper and Katarzyna Chojnacka) and Antonina Julianna Hoftmajster (daughter of Jan i Balbina Krostoska) got married in 1842 in Uniejow by Lodz. – user9081 Mar 6 '19 at 6:06
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Without the name of the parish or town from which your ancestor originated, it will be a tough slog and require enormous fortune to find more information. If you have patience and a lot of time, one place to look, though, is metryki.genealodzy which is a Polish project for indexing parish records. It is hit or miss whether one's parish records are there. My experience has been mixed.

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