2

In reading material for a course I'm doing on genealogy:

A minor was one under 21 but over 7. An infant was usually under 8, but sometimes referred to those under 21. However, in some countries an infant can mean they are aged under 1 year and a child someone who is over 1 but under 12 years of age.

Apparently in the 1750's an infant in the US was considered to be under 8 years but sometimes under 21 years but what about in 1850?

4
  • Where did you hear/read that "in the 1750's an infant in the US was considered to be under 8 years but sometimes under 21 years"? – PolyGeo Dec 24 '17 at 2:41
  • In reading material for a course I'm doing on genealogy "A minor was one under 21 but over 7. An infant was usually under 8, but sometimes referred to those under 21. However, in some countries an infant can mean they are aged under 1 year and a child someone who is over 1 but under 12 years of age". Apparently this was the case in the US in the 1750's but my question is whether this was the case in 1850. – Maggie Speak Dec 24 '17 at 4:20
  • Do you have a particular case in mind? It will be easier to answer the question if we can see the context. Also, could you add the source-of-source for your statement in your question? A reference to "reading material for a course I'm doing" doesn't help other researchers. – Jan Murphy Dec 24 '17 at 23:06
  • I found reference and answered my own question. This was part of an exam question that I answered incorrectly. – Maggie Speak Dec 25 '17 at 1:12
3

I’ve found reference to this.

source: http://www.mindserpent.com/American_History/reference/dictionaries/dictionaries_index.html 1843 Bouvier's Law Dictionary Vol 1 Page 674

…INFANT, persons, is one under the age of twenty-one years…

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.