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I have several examples of this same surname over time as shared in this answer for a marriage record.

Oldest example in Kurrent handwriting (around 1800): enter image description here

Groom of the marriage in 1837:

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Father of groom of the marriage in 1837:

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Next oldest around mid 1800s:

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Around 1873:

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And these three from around 1876:

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The modern spellings appear to clearly be Obaha, so are the earlier ones misread, stylistic variations, or what?

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    You're imposing 20th/21st century ideas of standardized spelling on an era where those standards didn't exist. Consider that in most original records, people have dictated their names to a clerk who wrote the record down, and even if they were literate themselves, they may not have seen their own entries in register books if there wasn't a requirement for them to sign the register. – Jan Murphy Jan 1 '18 at 2:15
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There seems to be a change from Obacha to Obaha. Could be a spelling change between languages (similar to zh to č); could be a pronunciation change over time, reflected in the spelling; could be due to different native language of the record-keepers (who recorded names as they heard them, using the spelling conventions they were familiar with).

enter image description here

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