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My 7th great-grandfather Clement Uren appears to have written a Will on 7 Aug 1745 making his wife Elizabeth and daughter Tiberia the beneficiaries.

At the Cornwall OPC (Online Parish Clerk) site there are two transcriptions:

  1. Record 1362145 in the Wills database:

Forename Clement Surname UREN Date Written 07-Aug Year Written 1745 Parish Illogan Beneficiaries Elizabeth Uren (wife),;Tiberia Uren (dau) Document Notes Proved 17-Jul 1747 Transcriber

  1. Record 1362155 in the Wills database:

Forename Clement Surname UREN Date Written 07-Aug Year Written 1745 Parish Illogan Beneficiaries Elizabeth Uren (wife); Tiberia Uren (dau) Document Notes Proved 30-Sep 1754 Transcriber

The two transcriptions have different Proved dates of 17 Jul 1747 and 30 Sep 1754 respectively.

If not a transcription error, is there any reason why a Will might be Proved twice?

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    I have seen cases of wills proved twice where an individual held land in different parts of England, and as a result the will had to be proved in both the PCC and the PCY. – sempaiscuba Apr 16 '20 at 9:55
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    I've seen one will that was proved several times as various beneficiaries, executors and lawyers died before probate was completed. But you'd probably need to read the later record to find out what happened here. – AndyW Apr 16 '20 at 14:21
  • Another possibility is that further property was found or inherited by the estate such that the value changed outside a previously stated limit. – AdrianB38 Apr 16 '20 at 18:00
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    One point - it's almost certainly not to be thought of proving the will twice, but a matter of adjusting something - executors, values, etc. Not much different but easier to get the head round. – AdrianB38 Apr 16 '20 at 18:03
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If you go to the Parish page for Illogan:

https://www.opc-cornwall.org/Par_new/h_k/illogan.php

and scroll down to the Wills section, you will find both grants of probate have been transcribed.

The first, listed as "Clement UREN", is the grant of 10 July 1747.

The second, listed as "Clement UREN, other copy void", is the grant of probate from 30 Sept 1754.

From a quick read, it seems the original executor died, so the will was proved again.

  • I see two entries "1745 Clement UREN" and "1745 Clement UREN, other copy void" with the latter being the probate from 30 Sep 1754. Since the link labels on the Cornwell OPC site don't include the dates of probates, it might be useful to include this information in your answer. – Jan Murphy Apr 20 '20 at 18:29

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