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Was not looking to discover my father wasn't my bio dad. Now I have a match claiming I'm his half- aunt.

I'm hoping that I'm NOT his parent’s half-sibling but instead their half-cousin.

Is it possible?

We share 1148 cM across 34 segments. 16%.

We're taking a proper DNA test in August but I'm just praying there's a possibility.

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  • dnapainter.com/tools/sharedcmv4/1148 lists a bunch of possible relationships. Jul 10 at 3:17
  • Hi, welcome to genealogy.SE. The male pronouns in this question are a little confusing. Can you clarify which he/him refer to your father and which ones refer to the potential match? e.g. "his half-aunt" ... his = the match?
    – shoover
    Jul 10 at 3:26
  • Hello. So...mother (M) had affair with bio-dad ((BD) who could be one of two brothers. I matched with someone on BD’s side with numbers posted. Either his grandfather is my bio dad or his grandfathers brother is. Jul 10 at 4:30
  • Too high to be a half cousin. You share about 12.5% with a cousin and 6.25% with a half cousin. Sorry to burst your bubble but it's better to be honest, there's very little chance that that would be a half cousin.
    – Charlie
    Jul 15 at 18:14
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Too high to be a half cousin. You share about 12.5% with a cousin and 6.25% with a half cousin. Sorry to burst your bubble but it's better to be honest, there's very little chance that that would be a half cousin.

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Check out the Shared cM chart to see the possibilities relationship around 1148 cM. It could be half niece/nephrew, niece/nephrew, great-niece/nephew, grandchild, and so on. You have to use genealogy to confirm the relationship. You do this by starting with the birth year of the match. Then try to fit them into your tree to confirm the relationship.

My concern is for the emotional toll this is taking on you. When dealing with an unexpected result, it's important to take time to process and confide your feelings into someone you trust. If the idea of being his half-aunt is not something you are excited about, it may be that you just aren't ready to process more information right now. Your dad will always be your dad who raised you. Make sure you are ready to deal with the good and bad consequences before you start to get to know your bio-dad's family. Remember that your mental health is most important. Follow your heart.

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