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I'm looking at the March 8, 1869 will of Samuel Fought in Monroe, Cumberland, Pennsylvania shown here:

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I'm having trouble reading the names of his children. As best as I can tell it reads something like the following transcription starting at the last line of the left page and continuing to the top of the right page:

... divided between my children Lry Martha Entermarried with Henry Rheinhart Meg Son John Elizabeth Entermarried with William Stevenson Henry B. Fought Isaac S. Fought William E. Fought Jonathan E Fought Mary Jane Fought share and share alike ... and so my son John is now dead and has left a daughter Ann Virginia Fought his share to go to his said daughter ... and I hereby charge my son John Fought now deceased with three hundred dollars and my daughter Martha Seventy five dollars and my daughter Elizabeth with Fifty dollars and my son Henry B Fought with seven hundred dollars and my son Isaac S Fought with seventy five dollars and my son William E Fought with five hundred dollars and further it is my desire that should my granddaughter Ann Virginia die before arriving at the age of twenty one years that all the money belonging to his in the hands of her guardian which come to her from her father, my John, should in that event divest to the rest of my children or their legal issue and further a bureau, a bed, and a looking glass is reserved for my daughter Mary Jane she having got the same as a present from her grand father Eckels and further I hereby nominate constitute and appoint my son Isaac S Fought my executor of this my last will and testament — In witness whereof I Samuel Fought the testator have to this my last will written on one sheet of paper and set my hand and seal this eight day of March one thousand eight hundred and sixty nine.

Is the word really Entermarried and does that mean he is naming his children's spouses? Also what is the word lry and is the name Rheinhart? Is it really stating that John is already dead?

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... divided between my children viz Martha Entermarried with Henry Rhinehart, My Son John, Elizabeth Entermarried with William Stevenson, Henry B. Fought, Isaac S. Fought, William E. Fought, Jonathan E. Fought, Mary Jane Fought share and share alike ... and as my son John is now dead and has left a daughter Ann Virginia Fought his share to go to his said daughter ... and I hereby charge my son John Fought now deceased with three hundred dollars and my daughter Martha Seventy five dollars and my daughter Elizabeth with Fifty dollars and my son Henry B Fought with seven hundred dollars and my son Isaac S Fought with Twenty five dollars and my son William E Fought with five hundred dollars and further it is my desire that should my granddaughter Ann Virginia die before arriving at the age of twenty one years that all the money belonging to her in the hands of her guardian which came to her from her father, my John, should in that event revert to the rest of my children or their legal issue and further a bureau, a bed, and looking glass is reserved for my daughter Mary Jane she having got the same as a present from her grand father Eckels and further I hereby nominate constitute and appoint my son Isaac S Fought my executor of this my last will and testament — In witness whereof I Samuel Fought the testator have to this my last will written on one sheet of paper and set my hand and seal this eight day of March one thousand eight hundred and sixty nine.

  • viz. is the abbreviation of the Latin adverb videlicet, meaning "namely" or "that is to say".
  • Entermarried simply means "married with". It is more commonly spelled intermarried. Yes, the testator is naming his daughter's husbands. I have added punctuation to that part of my transcription above which is not present in the original, in the hope it makes it clearer.
  • My impression is that the surname of the son-in-law is Henry Rhinehart, although it is a little bit difficult to differentiate whether it is "ine" vs "ein". In either case, it's a variant spelling of the same name.
  • Yes, his son John is already dead by the time the will was written.
  • Do you think that John and Jonathan E are two different people? – WilliamKF Oct 12 '15 at 2:04
  • @WilliamKF Yes, almost certainly. – Harry Vervet Oct 12 '15 at 2:12

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