6

Technique Generally when you cannot find information on very small or insignificant placenames, you research nearby larger places (because events may apply to a larger area) or the next placename in the hierarchy. You may even get lucky and find passing references to your main interest that weren't directly searchable. Scope Angloh (var. Angerloh) is ...


6

There are a lot of things going on in this question. I'll try to untangle a few of them. First, the word "ben" is Hebrew for "son of" (see eg https://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/tombstones.html), not "of" or "from" as you say. For example, Joseph ben Jochanon Treves is a person named Joseph Treves whose father was ...


5

According to p222 of the Harl version of the Heralds Visitation of Cheshire 1580 Thomas had two sons; Hugh who married daughter to Hulgreve Hall and Richard (my ancestor) who married a daughter of Bostock of Huxley. I am waiting to hear from the Chester Herald about the latter marriage. I believe that Maud and her father Richard may have been stated on the ...


5

When you have someone of this kind (Dukes, Duchesses. Earls, Knights....) in your tree then the books Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage and Dictionary of National Biography are good places to start. They are expensive but you will quite often find a copy in the reference section of your local main library. Burke's Peerage have a searchable website ...


4

A search of Google Books can yield fantastic results. Richard de Wydeville married Elizabeth, daughter of John Beldelgate and Mary nee Beauchamp: In the preface of the book cited above, the author, Sir Bernard Burke, describes his source material as follows:


4

Pamplona is in the region of Navarra and so you will need to search for records from this region. Family Search has quite a lot from this time period and is regularly adding more. Spanish records, in my experience, are normally very good with more information than you find in some other countries. You also need to be aware of naming conventions, the child ...


3

bgwiehle provided a great answer that might help with research for other small places as well. Some additions to Angloh. GOV (an gazetteer) lists Angloh as an “Einöd”. This means by definition just one or two residential houses, see e.g. German Wikipedia. Such places were (and are) common especially in southern Germany. Sometimes they vanished with the ...


3

The Guild of One-Name Studies has archived material from a former member who was studying the surname Tiltson that they will share with you if you contact them. It may well help you to confirm or deny what you have found so far.


2

I have seen lines that were entirely made up, so don't discount it. The two big ways it happens are: genealogical fraudsters who invent that stuff for profit (e.g. Gustave Anjou), and every once in a while you'll find something that some honest psycho basically hallucinated and decided to share with the world. In the case of legitimate trees, it's ...


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