8

The phrase "9th in descent from Edward I" means that Edward I appears 8 lines above her in her pedigree (i.e. Edward I was her 6x Gt Grandfather). What follows is a little complicated, but the lines: "via Clare, le Despencer, Berkeley, and Dennis" "Segrave, Mowbray, Berkeley, and Dennis" and "Bohun, FitzAlan, Mowbray, Berkeley, and Dennis" are ...


7

According to the Oxford Dictionary of First Names: Ferdinand ♂ From a Spanish name, originally Ferdinando (now Hernán), which is of Germanic (Visigothic) origin, derived from farð ‘journey’ (or possibly an altered form of frið ‘peace’) + nand ‘ready, prepared’. This was a traditional name in the royal families of Spain from an early date. It ...


5

The majority of original records for the lay subsidies are archived at The National Archives, not the local archives. For Cambridgeshire you will find the majority of c.1524 subsidy rolls in E 179/81. I prefer to look at what's available in the E 179 Database on TNA website. You need to browse through the records to see if particular hundreds or localities ...


4

It simply means the person had other children. The Legal Dictionary for the term issue states: 1) n. a person's children or other lineal descendants such as grandchildren and great-grandchildren. It does not mean all heirs, but only the direct bloodline. Occasionally, there is a problem in determining whether a writer of a will or deed meant issue ...


4

Pamplona is in the region of Navarra and so you will need to search for records from this region. Family Search has quite a lot from this time period and is regularly adding more. Spanish records, in my experience, are normally very good with more information than you find in some other countries. You also need to be aware of naming conventions, the child ...


3

Some ships were sent from Flanders to Scotland to return survivors back to Spain. A full account of the fate of survivors can be found in: The Downfall of the Spanish Armada in Ireland by Ken Douglas (Dublin : Gill & Macmillan, 2009). No names, only what happened to them.


3

I responded earlier, but now am able to view this on a tablet and can actually enlarge the image on a brighter screen so that I can "see" rather than squint at the text. I revise my earlier thoughts. It does indeed seem to read "five hundred four score and [something], the "score" being spelled "schore." And I wonder if that last word is "tenne" spelled ...


2

This is quite unclear text, but I'm going to have a proper go at this. Here's the image again: As @PolyGeo commented, after "year of our lorde god one thousande" appears to be "five hundrete". That puts us in the 1500s, which is at least the correct century. Then I think it's "foure", which is likely followed by "score and", although the "score" is hard to ...


2

The proper test to take in this situation is the Y-DNA test. Y-DNA as you have noted gets passed down the straight male line only. Why not autosomal tests. The 23AndMe autosomal test you did tests the DNA that you inherited from all your ancestors, not just the male line. There are two main problems with using that autosomal test for your situation. The main ...


2

Looking back at this again, I agree with the other answers insofar as the text reads: "one thousande five hundreth foure Schore and ___". That is, 1 thousand, 5 hundred, 4 score (80), and... As to the last word, I believe it reads "twoe". I have come across another will from the same parish a few years later (1601) which appears to be written in a very ...


2

Elias Ashmole was an antiquarian and collector (among other things), whose wide-ranging interests included heraldry and genealogy. The Ashmolean Museum in Oxford was founded to manage his collection, which he bequeathed to the University there. Google Books has a scan of "A Descriptive, Analytical and Critical Catalogue of the Manuscripts Bequeathed … by ...


2

Fluker's Brooke, which is now Flookersbrook in Hoole. http://chester.shoutwiki.com/wiki/Flookersbrook


1

As a free, fairly quick, and dirty test, you could ask your Swiss contact whether he knows a couple of males, from both populations, who are happy for their genotyped Y-Chromosomes to be compared,to see if there’s any obvious common SNP combinations that identify / differentiates the two groups. Ancestry genotype approximately 1,700 YDNA SNPs, to determine, ...


1

Your only chance will be to perform an investigation and get information about your ancestor's origin from Spain (if they were from there!), after that you might be able to find military records from Spain to see if any of those ancestors were part of the army (if registers exist). Actually being a 16th to 18th generations, you might be talking about XV ...


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