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A 'real Object of Charity' was somebody who was "blameless" (or whose parents were "blameless") in spite of needing charity. The specific form of words seems to have been widely used since at least the mid 18th century. From The Parliamentary History of England from the Earliest Period to the Year 1803: Volume 9 dated 1811: For this reason, great care ...


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One clue I would consider is the rank mentioned for the individual in the linked question. The Steward in 18th century British navy was a civil position, hired by the Captain. If we look at Wikipedia page describing Royal Navy Ranks and look at the description in the entry for Steward: A more senior cook and servant, usually reserved for flagships and ...


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The Captains' Log Books in series ADM 51 have the following catalogue description: These logs were maintained by the captain of each ship in commission, and kept in manuscript form on a continuous daily basis. They cover details of the employment and position of the ship and ship's company, details of weather encountered, and provide a full picture ...


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I now think that the John Stacey baptised on 30 Mar 1759 at North Petherton, Somerset to Henry and Elizabeth (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/N5WC-X2D) was not my 4th great grandfather. Instead I believe he originates from much closer to London based mainly on 1986 writings by my 2nd cousin twice removed Albert Ernest Stacy in "Colonial Cameos and ...


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