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36

The letter j originated as a "swash" (florish) character at the end of Roman numerals, and only later became useful as a separate character. A j was used for the final i, to make it clear the number had ended. Until quite recent times it was still the recommended practice to use a final j in medical prescriptions, to avoid misunderstandings. See these ...


11

Imprimis is Latin for "firstly". The word commonly appears in lists in parish registers and wills, preceding the first item.


9

Newspapers are the obvious source but thin out as one gets further back. One resource that is clearly a labour of love, records Historical Weather Events in the UK, collected (it looks like) from a variety of sources. However, note the warning on that screen that the site will disappear at some point. All is not lost, however, as it is one of those ...


9

It would have been very uncommon, if it ever happened, in the 1600s. And if it did happen, I imagine it would have only have been for a person of significant wealth or importance. The journey across the Atlantic took many weeks if not months. Most people would not want a body around for that period of time, when there were not many ways to keep a body well ...


7

According to the Oxford Dictionary of First Names: Ferdinand ♂ From a Spanish name, originally Ferdinando (now Hernán), which is of Germanic (Visigothic) origin, derived from farð ‘journey’ (or possibly an altered form of frið ‘peace’) + nand ‘ready, prepared’. This was a traditional name in the royal families of Spain from an early date. It ...


7

original, probably an exact transcript of the church register entry "verm. 2. post trin. 1649" with abbreviations expanded, German and Latin "vermahlt 2. [Sonntag] post Trinitatis 1649" English "married on the 2nd Sunday after Trinity Sunday 1649" Moveable Feast Day Calendar for: Germany states that although Catholic states had converted earlier (...


6

I am speaking from my experience of Scottish records but I have no reason to suspect that the practice was greatly different in England. In Scotland, couples were frequently rebuked for ante-nuptial fornication when children arrived rather too soon after marriage. This would be recorded in the kirk session minutes of the parish (kirk session = minister and ...


6

Oooh, I like this question. And I have data to contribute! This data set is from the Israel Genealogy Research Association's "All Israel Database" (http://genealogy.org.il/AID/index.php) which, as of August 2015, covers over 576,000 records that were collected in, or chiefly about, the land of Israel in its Ottoman period, British Mandate period, and ...


6

Building on the previous answer, the section is headed: Recogn' contin' Respect' & capt' apud ult' sess' (roughly translated: recognizances respited and taken at the last sessions) The entry in question comp' & ex' Arthurus Bewsey de Holnest agr' pro b. b. pro b. g. (appeared and discharged Arthur Bewsey of Holnest, farmer, for good ...


5

As this is Cornwall we have the advantage that images of the original registers are available on Familysearch, and after a bit of digging I found the relevant page. The transciption is pretty much as you've already seen: Johannes Penhalynna et Peternella Lang matr. contraxerunt 1 Nob. 1642 As has already been suggested I think it is literally just ...


5

The text is indeed Latin, although most words are English names, and some other words are English as well. What I read is this: Arthurus Bewcy de holnest agij. pro b.b. pro b.g. This agij could also be agr, although the r normally seems to be written differently. But other entries state the trade of the person, like "labourer" and "spinster", so could ...


5

Parish registers can only get you so far. You need to look at other sources. My first tack would be wills and probate since they often contain very useful genealogical information. A quick search of the Cornwall Archives catalogue shows 12 wills for Hambleys in Menheniot, several of which were made during the period of interest, which might mention Blanch ...


5

An avenue to explore would be property transactions, especially if you believe they may be a family of means. For some reason (!) the English state has always paid particular attention to creating and retaining records about property. (A short version of this says: Follow the money -- the records of baptisms marriages and burials at this time were in the ...


5

Let's look at the nature of the source first, using the Evidence Analysis Process Map, keeping in mind the elements of the Genealogical Proof Standard and other good genealogical practices. On the EE website, in the discussion Citing transcribed records - document or database in the Citation issues forum, Elizabeth Shown Mills talks about the problem of how ...


4

Biblical names may not necessarily signify non-conformist affiliations. There are certainly cases, even before non-conformism was around, where Biblical names more likely signified stronger than average (conventional) religious convictions. For example, one Abraham Dewce moved from elsewhere (possibly Wolverhampton) to take up duties as vicar of Abdon, ...


4

Hmm - I think the answer might be "It seemed like a good idea at the time" more often than we care to imagine. My Pickstock families from mid-Cheshire in the 1800s seem to like to use more unusual names. They were, so far as I can see, Methodists when I've been able to confirm their faith, but for interest, my 4G GF named his children thus: James Martha ...


4

You could try seeking any diaries from your time and place of interest. It is for a different hemisphere and different century but I am lucky enough to have an 1873 diary written by my 74 year old 3rd great grandfather, Thomas Hitchcox) in Adelaide (South Australia), and the one thing he wrote every day was what the weather was. After early vocations as a ...


4

Not a perfect answer, but the Met Office has made historical data available here as part of the OpenGov scheme. It only goes back to 1853 so it doesn't cover your 17th-18th century criterion and some of the data is aggregated. However, it should be of some use.


4

I got a translation. For the record: The first the 7th July 1612 The second the 14th July 1612 The third the 21st of July 1612 Are married before Frans Adriaensz. van Leewen and Jacob Paedts aldermen this 23rd [22nd?] July 1612 Registered The fourth of July 1612 George Morton, Englishman from York in England, a young man and ...


4

This is the image from the source linked in your question: I retweeted your question during a chat today, and Fergus Smith at http://www.oldscottish.com/ kindly gave this answer (you can see from the conversation that Jane N Harris agrees): In C17th St Andrews, Mr implied magister i.e. master's degree rather than bachelor's. Your source confirms this ...


4

It sounds like you and your friend have already made considerable effort in dating the clock. I won't question the expertise of whoever suggested it "dates to about 1635" and was "almost certainly made in London," but I would keep in mind that it can be very difficult to accurately date artefacts. In this case, one concern would be that it could be a later ...


4

A godson does not have to be any relation at all to his godparents, and often is not. I would think a godson is unlikely to also be a son-in-law, given godparents are named at the time of baptism (usually in infancy), and it would be a bit coincidental for the father of his future wife to be present. Given the information given here, my guess would be that ...


3

An index to "Clocks Magazine" reports: Chittel, William, of Studley, May 2013 p14 Unfortunately the magazine's website is down at present, but the Google cache of it is available. Scroll down or search for "Chit" on that page to find the reference. A search for that issue might be worthwhile. The magazine site has a back-issues page, so when/if it ...


3

Have you done a literature search? (Familienkundlichen Literaturdatenbank, GoogleBooks, WorldCat, etc.) There are several periodical articles and books (in German) that seem to deal with the family in your question: Die Herkunft von vier Untertürkheimer Familien / Rupp, Friedrich In: Südwestdeutsche Blätter f. Familien- u. Wappenk. 15, 1976-78, S. 427-428 ...


3

Kayer = A coarse sieve used to winnow corn (separate large from small) https://books.google.com/books?id=tUYOAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA31&dq=kayer++corn+-layer&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CEgQ6AEwCGoVChMI0ZGO8umbyAIVhFiSCh09Zg62#v=onepage&q=kayer&f=false ----------------------------------------------------- Looms/Lomes = An open vessel of any kind; ...


3

According to this marriage index (page 61, ) Franciscus Van Sever and Barbara Soetewey married at 27-01-1756, a number mentioned B338 There are no other Van Sever's mentioned in the index, also no "Van Cever" I couldn't find the original, so the index is the only proof. For that you'll have to visit an archive in real life. Probably the Rijksarchief @ ...


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