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5

They are death notices. Go to the previous page, two paragraphs up from the bottom, and you will see the small heading: Died.] Just for kicks, here are, I believe, the relevant burials: Kemerton burials: 4 Jun 1811, Catherine Anne Mumford, aged 22 yrs Stroud burials: 10 Jun 1811, Arabella wife of Charles Newman, age 39 Cirencester burials: 28 May 1811, ...


5

First, Sarah Penrod is indicated as living in 1807 by the property description saying that adjacent to the west of the property being deeded is "the messuage, land of plantation whereon Mrs. Sarah Penrod now lives and occupies". There is nothing indicating when Sarah Penrod's death may have taken place. The last paragraph, made in 1812, has nothing to do ...


4

In "Tracing Your Army Ancestors, Third Edition: A Guide for Family Historians" by Simon Fowler (ISBN 9781473876392), there is a section on Pension Records. From a Google Books scan: The most common entry was 'DD' for discharged dead. Occasionally the date of death is given as well. "DD" is certainly a common remark, based on a brief perusal of the ...


4

The main marriage law in force from 1754 until 1823 was the Marriage Act 1753, also known as Hardwicke's Act (26 Geo. II. c. 33). An important thing to note in your case is that the marriage was by banns. The only instance where a marriage at this time would be invalid if solemnized without consent of parents would be if it was by licence and one or both ...


3

I don't have access to the book, but some of these things can be worked out, I think. Genealogyresources.org has numerous full and substitute Virginia census records (for purchase, but with summaries online). As an example, the page for Halifax County notes: The early laws required ... the names of the person chargeable with the tax, the names of white male ...


3

Being I do not have all of the background (as in location, was Elizabeth her first or middle or nick name) I did some picking at the information and came up with the following: With so little information this may be a bit error prone but this is what I found in about 20 minutes of poking around, it is at least a lead: Theory: In 1830 Elizabeth was already ...


2

He also seems to be appear in the index to the 1861 census on FamilySearch as "Andrew Duggan", This might suggest a transcription error, but double check on the original image. The following screenshot is from FreeCen: I checked FreeBMD, and found a death record for an Andrew Duggan in West West Bromwich in 1865. This is just before ages were added to the ...


1

I think I may have lucked out on this search. I found this book: Irish Furniture: Woodwork and Carving in Ireland from the Earliest Times to ... A quick look in the appendix shows an alphabetical listing of Irish cabinet makers; some in the 1700's. The actual book looks pretty interesting; I might get one for myself. You can find out more about the book ...


1

A candidate for your Handy Dugan may be Andreas Duggan who was baptised 31 May 1816 at Killea, Waterford, Ireland to parents Matthai Duggan and Catharina Power. Another candidate may be Andrew Duggan who married Mary Cassin in Feb 1839 at Raheen, Laois, Ireland. I found both candidates in the Ireland, Catholic Parish Registers, 1655-1915 of Ancestry.com.


1

The Three United Trades of Dundee is the website for the relevant guild in Dundee. The Wrights was apparently the one to cover joiners - other places may divide the trades differently, and the Wrights were themselves split up. I have not checked to see what the site holds. This may give at least some inspiration. Note that qualification to trade in Dundee ...


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