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6

A Guide to Using the Records of Civil Registration from the Society of Genealogists says: The records of civil registration in England & Wales, which commenced on 1 July 1837, relate to the birth, marriage and death of an individual. ... In England & Wales, up to that time, the government had relied very much on the church to register ...


5

So far as I remember in my data, it's always her current name prior to the marriage about to take place. NB I haven't constructed a query to check this out but that's how it seems to go. I definitely tweaked the text schemes on my diagrams to cope with this. I'd rephrase your comment about Scots marriages, by the way. It's not that they explicitly record ...


4

I suspect this refers to his degree – Master of Arts (Artium Magister), now more commonly abbreviated as M.A. In the vital records you found this entry in, there is another John Rogers (d.1782), a Reverend (and apparently the father of your John Rogers), who also has A.M. after his name. I could not find an image of the headstone for John Rogers d. 1827 – ...


4

The primary purpose of the OPRs was to record baptisms, marriages and (if you are really, really lucky) burials carried out by a Church of Scotland minister in that parish. While there seems to have been some sort of intention that all births / baptisms and marriages should be recorded, in all my families (I'm 1/8 Scottish descent) I've only ever seen this ...


4

Not a direct answer but may provide you with additional leads. There are numerous references to "Yorkshire Hall" and William Chichester (as chichester, chionester, and chishester) at this website: vc.id.au (Van Cooten Voices), in the Guyana Colonial Newspapers section The best method for searching the site is to use Google's site search, for instance: ...


4

I have not come across the term before but found this in the Derbyshire Courier November 15, 1851: It sounds like an event rather than a place. In many other references to Mansfield Statutes (and other statutes like Bolsover Statutes) that I found there were often mentions of servants being hired so that seems to have been something of a focus for it/them. ...


4

A potential answer from communication with the volunteer for this parish at Cornwall Online Parish Clerks: 'Barah' is likely a small farm adjacent to Headon Barrow in Jacobstow parish. The barrow itself is a prehistoric burial ground, which are quite common in Cornwall, but according to the 'online parish clerk', barrow would have been pronounced and heard ...


3

I'd agree with @AdrianB38's answer: in my experience, the current name tends to be used. It's certainly possible that a woman might revert to her maiden name after being widowed, but I don't recall seeing it happen (yet, in admittedly limited experience). So I'd expect that "Morgan" was the surname of Maria's deceased husband. As an example, there is a ...


3

For Document 2, you say: The second ... is from: Orphans Court Proceedings, 1752-1857; Index; Author: Pennsylvania. Orphans' Court (Berks County); Probate Place: Berks, Pennsylvania and Document 2 From 1821 referencing page 483. Michael listed as "Children Guardian" Catherine and Joseph as "Guardian Appointed". The index appears to say Volume 7 ...


3

It may help to keep an open mind on this question, since the records in Scotland are not going to be as tidy and regular at this period as they might have been in a later period, especially when compared to post-civil-registration church records from south of the Border. The section Proclamation and Banns from the article OPR Banns & Marriages at ...


2

I take it that the two records are on FamilySearch. Record 1 Charles Kerby & Mary Ann Hart 11 May 1828 Allerthorpe, York, England Film 2104781 Record 2 Charles Kirby & Mary Ann Hart 17 May 1828 Allerthorpe By Pocklington,York,England Film 990927 You need to find out what record is being indexed in each case. Using the ...


2

One of the other UCL pages notes that in 1826 Yorkshire Hall was: "In lawful possession of Thomas Skelton by his attorney William Chichester". That suggests to me that William did not (then) own plantations, but was heavily involved in their management. He may later have acquired the land from the Skeltons, as Jared does appear to be an owner. Additionally,...


2

From Wikipedia the 4th Earl of Minto appears to have been born about 25 years after the Elizabeth Elliot in your question was married: Gilbert John Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound, 4th Earl of Minto KG GCSI GCMG GCIE PC (9 July 1845 – 1 March 1914) was a British nobleman and politician who served as Governor General of Canada, the eighth since Canadian ...


2

It looks like Ancestry has done a semi-indexed pass-through of FamilySearch's Pennsylvania Probate Records. If you go to FamilySearch directly, their microfilm set includes not only the Orphan's Court Proceedings for Berks County, Pa., but also the Orphan's Court Dockets, the wills & administration files, and the estate files themselves (although the ...


2

I have two of these and both their marriage certificates show the married with the surname of their husband BUT they have previously .... showing their maiden name. So, for example Georgina Squelch previously Copping. I have another who married three times and that has formerly ..... as well. So all three of mine do list the maiden name as well but ...


2

According to this page, the Church of Scotland seems to have recorded all marriages. Before the introduction of civil registration in 1855 Church of Scotland parish ministers and session clerks kept registers of births and baptisms, proclamations of banns and marriages, and deaths and burials. Thus, I'd say yes to "Would a Catholic irregular session ...


1

The Three United Trades of Dundee is the website for the relevant guild in Dundee. The Wrights was apparently the one to cover joiners - other places may divide the trades differently, and the Wrights were themselves split up. I have not checked to see what the site holds. This may give at least some inspiration. Note that qualification to trade in Dundee ...


1

To search Church of Ireland records you would need a more precise location than just 'Cork' - ideally a parish or town name. Cork could mean Cork city or County Cork, a very large number of parishes. Whereas Catholic records are well covered online on various systems, coverage of Protestant records for Cork city & county is very limited, the main source ...


1

I think I may have lucked out on this search. I found this book: Irish Furniture: Woodwork and Carving in Ireland from the Earliest Times to ... A quick look in the appendix shows an alphabetical listing of Irish cabinet makers; some in the 1700's. The actual book looks pretty interesting; I might get one for myself. You can find out more about the book ...


1

No, it would not list the Maiden name of the woman. From 1837 onwards it would be likely to list the name, trade or profession of the father of both parties on the marriage certificate. However that would be too late in this instance. If you would care to let me have the basics of the information on the case that are already known to you. So that I do not ...


1

I just participated in the Family Search Indexing transcribing mostly marriage records. However, on some records, it was only the application, not the actual marriage. I chose not to enter those and requested some help on what to do but never got it. So, someone could have transcribed the application date for the marriage date as "application" was not an ...


1

Banns are usually read 3 times and the marriage usually takes place shortly after the 3rd reading (traditionally the following Saturday). Banns are read in both the bride and grooms parish (if they are not the same) and also in the parish in which they are to be married if different. So the wedding may have been Saturday 4th April or on any day up to 3 ...


1

I am also looking at this Slight family and have failed to find the baptisms of Susan, William & James. I have viewed the image of Susan Slight's marriage to Robert Ewart. It states that the banns were read at St Cuthberts but they were married by the Rev George Ramsay Davidson minister of Lady Glenorchy's Free Church. It is possible that the 3 ...


1

On FreeREG there is record of banns for the parents: Banns read 15th, 22nd, and 29th March 1829 at Haddington Parish Church: James Slight, of Haddington, and Elizabeth Boyd, of Haddington. Witnessed by Thomas Boyd and William Slight. I can't seem to locate the marriage on ScotlandsPeople, which is a bit strange. If they married after these banns ...


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