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7

By "Removal" all that is meant is that Joseph Anslow left his membership at Brewood Independent when he moved to Tipton. This is not to be confused with the poor law system of removal which was a forced removal of poor individuals to their home parish. On a previous page there is someone who removed "To America". This is also not a record of legal settlement,...


5

GENUKI's gazetteer entry for Kenwyn says: The parish of Kenwyn, (Cornish: Keynwynn), is situated in the Deanery and Hundred of Powder. It is bounded on the north by St Allen, on the east by St Clements, the parish of St Marys Truro and the river Fal, on the south by Kea, and on the west by St Agnes, the detached part of Kea called Tregavethen, and ...


5

The OP notes a record on Ancestry that describes Philip Rule's discharge from Bodmin jail in 1839. It does not give a reason for incarceration, nor a committal date. This appears to be the only record on that site for Philip in Bodmin. The timing of, and reasons for, his jailing may be found in the aforementioned Pocock database, but there is a chance that ...


4

Not a direct answer but may provide you with additional leads. There are numerous references to "Yorkshire Hall" and William Chichester (as chichester, chionester, and chishester) at this website: vc.id.au (Van Cooten Voices), in the Guyana Colonial Newspapers section The best method for searching the site is to use Google's site search, for instance: ...


4

I see that when Thomas and Elizabeth married in Ontario in 1860, Thomas was residing in Oshawa and Elizabeth in Whitby. Therefore, this looks to be a likely bet for them on the 1861 census of Canada (image available on Ancestry.ca). East Whitby, Ontario, Canada West (roll C-1058-1059, p 4): Charles Kirby, Labourer, b. England, W[esleyan] M[ethodist], ...


4

Looks like it's Sprinklesburgh – an old name for the town that is now Newburgh, Warrick Co., Indiana. The original name was after founder John Sprinkle. According to this Newburgh History, Sprinklesburgh was united with Newburg in 1841 to form Newburgh.


4

In the 1851 Census there is a William Rouse aged 18 living with his brother-in-law's family. William Hobbs Elizabeth Hobbs (Nee Rouse) Elizabeth Jane Hobbs Kitty Rouse (Mother in law) William Rouse (brother in Law) This would make him Elizabeth's brother. William Crossman had a younger sister Elizabeth who married William Hobbs. Kitty Rouse is the ...


3

It may help to keep an open mind on this question, since the records in Scotland are not going to be as tidy and regular at this period as they might have been in a later period, especially when compared to post-civil-registration church records from south of the Border. The section Proclamation and Banns from the article OPR Banns & Marriages at ...


3

This does not precisely answers your question, but I believe helps somehow (could not render it as a comment). I singled out in red the hebrew texts I could notice. Let's split them into 2 groups: to the left of the vertical double-line separator to the right of this same separator I believe the beginning of the text in group (1) denotes the date (year). ...


2

First let's look at the units of measure in these two documents. The first transcription (1834) says Francis Green (FG) occupies four fields of 12 acres. The second document (1828) says Hugh Biddick (HB) occupies two fields of 7A. 3R. 35P., while FB occupies house, mowhay, and two fields of 5A. 0R. 23P. A. R. P. are a historically used system of area ...


2

The birth is likely documented in the Zivilstandsregister, which are available for the period between 1811 and 1875 at the Hamburg state archive. Another source might be church records, available from the same archive or local parishes (you have to determine the parish first).


2

In general, a good starting point is often the FamilySearch Research Wiki page for the place you are interested in. In the case of Lübeck, the FamilySearch Research Wiki page for civil registration shows that indexes and images for births are available for the period 1811 - 1875, which covers your period of interest. The page for church records shows that ...


2

If he was Protestan/Lutherian you could try https://www.archion.de/en/ It is an online archive of the german protestant churches, where you can find a lot (albeit not all) church records.


2

I know you have solved this, but this is my rationale. The most likely solution is that it is a transcription error, and Matthew's surname should have been transcribed as Moore. As it is so easy to check the original record on this one, do not rely on FamilySearch's transcription. You can view the original entry here on FamilySearch. So clearly not a ...


2

It turns out that @bgwiehle was right. Namely, she was born a Lark(e), married George Moore, who died, and then re-married Charles Lark. Slightly confusing, but it would have been vastly more confusing without this piece of documentation. And indeed, her father's name is Mathew. Charles, as it turns out, is her 1st cousin. Some of the evidence includes: ...


2

I am 2 x great grandson of William Crossman Rouse. I too have come across William Henry and have come to the same conclusion that William Crossman and someone called Elizabeth had a child out of wedlock. It is interesting to note that his eldest son Henry Green Rouse stayed in Cornwall when William Henry went to Australia.


2

One of the other UCL pages notes that in 1826 Yorkshire Hall was: "In lawful possession of Thomas Skelton by his attorney William Chichester". That suggests to me that William did not (then) own plantations, but was heavily involved in their management. He may later have acquired the land from the Skeltons, as Jared does appear to be an owner. Additionally,...


2

"The 1850 Census began on 1st June 1850. The enumeration was completed within five months. " - Source: A Guidebook to American Genealogy This matches what you've observed about the dates on censuses. The data if taken for example 21st September would be relating to the household on 1st June rather than the day it was taken. In the same book: "The 1830 ...


2

I want to echo Jan Murphy's remarks. In addition, I find the spelling of the last name to be extremely curious. This does not look like a German name at all. How much do you know about your great grandfather before he arrive in North America? Do you know his birth place, beyond Saxony? A cursory search on Ancestry.com in that approximate part of Germany in ...


1

The FamilyHistory.co.uk website have a section dedicated to Cornwall Family History - http://www.familyhistory.co.uk/cornwall-family-history/ They include details of Cornwall Record Office and they might be worth contacting. They also include details of the local Cornwall Newspaper Archives and the dates covered. The Royal Cornwall Gazette covers the ...


1

Banns are usually read 3 times and the marriage usually takes place shortly after the 3rd reading (traditionally the following Saturday). Banns are read in both the bride and grooms parish (if they are not the same) and also in the parish in which they are to be married if different. So the wedding may have been Saturday 4th April or on any day up to 3 ...


1

In the absence of an answer that locates a baptism record for William Slight, I am going to provide a proof argument tying him to his birth family, which also ties down when and where his birth occurred. The evidence used is indirect, but convincing. No single document ties William to his birth family. The sum of many pieces of evidence establishes this ...


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