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20

I note that Charles Thomas Gigg was baptised on 13 Feb 1887 at St James Norlands, Kensington. His mother is given as Hannah Sarah Gigg, of 5 Mary's Place, single: Source: Ancestry.co.uk, London, England, Church of England Births and Baptisms, 1813-1906 Whenever I have a case of a mother and illegitimate child vanishing without trace, my first thought is ...


8

You may also check Szumki (pronounced /shoomki/), Bielsk county, Poland. The entire Bielsk county was occupied by Russia between 1807 and 1915. There's a weak point in this version, I can't figure out what "As" may mean here. It can be a distorted "osada" ("settlement") or something else.


7

That appears to be the index card for the naturalisation petition in New Haven Connecticut. The birthplace may well be mis-transcribed by the indexer. I think you can check the original naturalisation documents on FindMyPast or Ancestry (I haven't used these particular collections before, so I'm uncertain about the exact nature of the contents). I don't ...


6

Part of your difficulty lies in the way the big data sites like Ancestry encourage us to 'do genealogy' -- we look for our 'people' by cherry-picking the most likely matches to the person we're seeking, then we try to assemble all the bits we've found into a recognizable portrait of a person. Hint-based or index-driven searching encourages us to take the ...


5

I think it may be the town of Yelisavetgrad (also spelled Yelisavetgrod), now the city of Kropyvnytskyi in central Ukraine. If you are able to read Polish, the entry for Elizabetgrod in the Glossary of the Kingdom of Poland and other Slavic countries may provide some useful background. (Pages are shown as TIFF images, but with an OCR program, a little (or, ...


5

No. The legal process for adoption the UK wasn't introduced until 1926/27. Before that adoptions were informal agreements and did not need to be legally registered. https://www.jstor.org/stable/30009455?seq=1 will give you some background information. The answer at https://genealogy.stackexchange.com/a/2801/6485 may also give you some ideas of how to ...


5

One place you could start is with TNA's research guide on How to Look for Courts martial and desertion in the British Army 17th-20th centuries (tip courtesy of David Underdown on Twitter). Make a timeline of the events, combining the entries from the Service at Home and Abroad page: and the page Statement of the Services which you've posted above: ...


5

The first thing is to narrow down the location that he died. This can be rather tricky, but there's a few ways to do it. Considering it's in the 1800's, you have a lot of options. Generally speaking, here's what you do. Try to compile as accurate of a timeline as you can. Find the last date that you have a record for. Census is a good start, use tax records ...


4

I have tried to remove as much of the paper color as possible, as a means of highlighting what was written: My best interpretation is "J. H. Gold":


4

This does read like a gravestone epitaph, especially the line from the hymn "Come unto Me and rest". There are a few resources for the Isle of Wight that would be my first ports of call. The Isle of Wight FHS website contains two databases that are potentially useful in your case: Monumental Inscriptions Index: The coverage page says that inscriptions for ...


4

Depending on how close to the end of the 19th century you are looking for, this may be one such database that Ancestry.com has assembled: About England, Alien Arrivals, 1810-1811, 1826-1869 This data collection contains lists of aliens (non-British citizens) arriving in England between 1810 and 1869. The records come from the following National ...


4

I agree with other comments/answers, that this is probably due to misreading t's as d's, and you are looking at Enteritis. Here are some resources to double check, or for future issues: Genealogy Quest, medical terminology archaicmedicalterms.com(link is to the E's) Hall Genealogy Website has a list of medical terms However, none of these has Endeidis.


4

A good starting point is often the FamilySearch Research Wiki page for the place you are interested in. Unfortunately, in this case, the page about civil registration for Turkey genealogy just states that civil registration in Turkey began in 1884 and doesn't provide any useful contact addresses. This may be because, as it states on the main page, ...


4

I think you may be talking about a town that is no longer in Russia, but rather was in the Russian empire at the time your ancestor's record was created. In Belarus there is a town Delyatichi (Alternate names: Delyatichi [Rus], Delatycze [Pol], Delatitch [Yid], Dzialacičy [Bel], Delyatyche, Dzjaljacicy.) - I would say with almost 100% certainty that this is ...


4

As already mentioned in the comment by AndyW, there were "contesting widows" -- cases where two women applied for the pension of the same veteran. One article examining these cases is Beverly Schwartzberg's article, "Lots of Them Did That": Desertion, Bigamy, and Marital Fluidity in Late-Nineteenth-Century America" in the *Journal of Social History, *Volume ...


4

I think the pension file has a clerical error that has somehow combined two different people. In PA Civil War unit rosters, you find both George Heffelfinger and Mahlon Buchert (or Buchard). In the 1870 census you can find in Penn. Mahlon, wife Catherine, and two children born not long after the civil war. Mahlon was born 1840/41. George Heffelfinger has a ...


3

The other place that you could check is the Kirk Sessions records for the parish where her mother was living when she was born (you should have the parish from the birth certificate). Although many have been digitised, at present these are not available online. You would have to visit one of the local archives in Scotland that have access to the collection. ...


3

I think the next things to check: the cities, towns and villages names were probably written as the clerk heard it. The clerk does not have any idea what is the correct spelling of the place where application's owner came. And it is normal. A lot of people from Belarus and Poland area migrated to the USA. I bet that this man originates also from this region....


3

Much of the advice given in the previous question Tracing US ancestor back to Germany? will also apply to this question -- in this answer I will add information specific to immigrants to the US during the early 20th Century. The first thing I do with any research question is to start with a review of all the records I have collected so far. I make a list ...


2

From: http://www.archerfamily.org.uk/family/weale.htm Arthur George Morey [WEALE], partner in the firm of Cornes & Co., Japan 1897-1911, of Impington Hall, Cambridgeshire and Echo Pit Lodge, Warwick’s Bench, Guildford, b. 8 Nov 1865 in Strawberry Vale, Twickenham, bapt 24 Dec 1865 at Old Church, Teddington, d. 22 Sep 1940 in Guildford (Will dated 21 Dec ...


2

Here's the only photographer I found with initials J. H. Name: James H Schwartz Residence Year: 1887 Street address: ws Broad Residence Place: Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri, USA Occupation: Photographer Publication Title: Kansas City, Missouri, City Directory, 1887


2

There is no such thing as Endeidis, so it is definitely a misspelling. Of what it is a misspelling would just be a guess. I tend to agree that Enteritis is most likely You say that this is typewritten on a "death certificate" from 1895 in Lucas County, Ohio. This suggests that the scribe of that death certificate did not know what they were reading. I ...


1

http://www.lostshoebox.com/poland/online-records/ I have used the above link. It is helpful because there is a map where each district shows the numbers to which the matching number is a database that includes material for that area.


1

I have found such references: Géographie universelle, Vol 3 Wzielub (Vsieloub) & Dolatycze (Dolatitche) petites villes I believe that this is the same with https://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delatycze It is now territory of Belarus.


1

Although difficult to find, I found original records for 4 great uncles (all became Catholic priests) and a great aunt, all of whom were born in Magdeburg, and a marriage record for their parents, my great grandparents between 1870 and 1886 on ancestry.com. It wasn't a straight forward search since it was not indexed by my great grandparents names but only ...


1

Did he become a US Citizen? Or at least start the process? (You might be able to discern this from looking at census records, voter registration records, and/or military records.) If so, look for his naturalization records first, and work backwards from there, since they will have the information about what ship he traveled on, and to which port, and under ...


1

I examined the eight people that I wrote about in my question and concluded that none of them are my ancestor. I have examined all the records of foreigners in the 1890s and only Cecil Zohrab Ede remains as my possible ancestor. Circumstantial evidence we have suggests that he is my great-grandfather with little chance of there being a mistake. However,...


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