12

I think (having looked at the full page on FindMyPast) that it probably actually says "were" so that it reads: John Smith Captains Clarke of his Majestys Ship Firm and Sarah Osment of St Andrews Plymouth a minor with consent of parents were married in this church by licence this thirteenth Day of July in the Year One Thousand Seven Hundred and Sixty ...


10

This answer is based on my experience with English probate records. While the probate process in the British colonies differed from that of the colonial power, the process was no doubt modelled on its British counterpart. In England, it was customary for the testator to mention all his children in his will such that it was clear that none had been forgotten....


9

Newspapers are the obvious source but thin out as one gets further back. One resource that is clearly a labour of love, records Historical Weather Events in the UK, collected (it looks like) from a variety of sources. However, note the warning on that screen that the site will disappear at some point. All is not lost, however, as it is one of those ...


9

Mathias, Andreæ [Kousheg?] ejusque uxoris gertrudis [Vidmagesin?], fil. legit. sub Dno [Ashiber?], baptizatus est 13 Januarÿ 1771 per M. ?. D. Mathiam [Mervezh?] cooperat. Patrini Anton Kovatschetski et Catharina Schirzlin ex [Hvartouza?]. Matthew, legitimate son of Andrew [Kousheg] and his wife Gertrude [Vidmages], was baptized in district [Ashiber] on ...


8

The descriptive pamphlet for NARA microcopy publication T718 is a reproduction of its entry in the print catalog of microfilm publications. It contains a roll list and a brief description of the entries in the register. Each entry shows the name of the pensioner, the name of the veteran (if different), the name of the pension agent, the name of the ...


8

It appears to be: "Bankhead of Turfbeg" Turfbeg is a district to the north-east of the modern town, in roughly the same place as "Bankhead" on this snippet from an 1850 map by James Knox: Bankhead and Turfbeg can be seen in rather better detail in this snippet from the 1861 Ordnance survey map of Forfar:


7

In the colonial period, language usage for kinship terms (and other terms) was not necessarily the same as it is today. Several of the 'how to' books I've read have said that in the colonial period, 'junior' and 'senior' were not necessarily indicative of father/son, but simply meant 'the younger' or 'the elder' if there were two men with the same name in ...


7

According to the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) one meaning of cousin is: A collateral relative more distant than a brother or sister; a kinsman or kinswoman, a relative; formerly very frequently applied to a nephew or niece. Obsolete. The last quotation applicable to this meaning is dated 1747 (S. Richardson Clarissa I. vi. 36). (I only just noticed that'...


7

An archaic meaning of spurious was illegitimate. See: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/spurious


7

I am no export on Hesse, but I did a little research: Your LAGIS results are civil registration which started in 1874. Church records for several parishes in today’s city of Kassel were destroyed during World War II, according to a text from 1954 at the local history site Erinnerungen im Netz, Erlebtes aus dem Osten Kassels. They name: Waldau, Nieder-und ...


7

Having thought it through a bit, Google helped and I found this article on the FamilySearch Wiki that is adapted from a print article by respected genealogist, Anthony Camp. Although it is about bonds on marriage licences and the original question is about probate bonds in particular, I see no reason why what applies to one bond type shouldn't apply to them ...


7

The "widow's third" was a portion of a man's estate guaranteed to his wife after his death, regardless of what his will stated. This excerpt from "Material Culture in America: Understanding Everyday Life" (Google Books Link) describes the concept: Known also as the "widow's portion" or "widow's third", a widow's right of dower was ... a legal practice in ....


7

I believe that this refers to the Intention. At that time, the couple wishing to be married would file an intention to be married. This would be published in the home town of both sets of parents and in the town the couple lived in. If there was no objection from the community after a given period, they could then get married. Engaged couples are required ...


7

The third column is the "Rate / acre" amount in shillings and pence. (e.g. 10/ is 10 shillings and 0 pence. 7/6 would be 7 shillings and 6 pence ...) There were 12 pennies in a shilling and 20 shillings in a pound. For the first row, the rate is 10 shillings per acre on 100 acres = 1000 shillings = £60 For the second row, the rate is 4 shillings / acre ...


7

I think that the "X" is actually just a poorly formed "F". I looked at the Rocque Map for that part of Bermondsey. Although the map is a little earlier (it's dated 1746), it gives a pretty good idea of how the area would have looked when your ancestors were living there. Snows Field and Crucifix Lane both intersect with Barnaby Street (now just part of ...


7

I think the occupation written is: Painter (House) Although not capitalized, there are two entries for Keeps house in the following few rows that you can use to compare the "ouse" ending to the word.


7

The word is 'List'. As far as I can make out,the name preceding the word List is that of the 'Master' and the names that follow are those of their household, slaves or servants. So, for the extracts in your question, we have: First image: Mary Clay's List ... Second image: John Sturdivant's List ... Third image: Obadiah Smith's List ...


7

According to Rebecca Probert in Marriage Law for Genealogists the definitive guide Key fact: before 25th March, 1754, neither the Church nor the secular courts regarded as valid any marriage that had not been celebrated before an ordained Anglican clergyman. If your ancestors were not Anglican (e.g. Catholic or non-conformist) they may have wished to ...


7

As a fellow rookie, one trick the others haven't mentioned, is to search the marriage registers in the parishes of Thorganby, Nether Poppleton, Fulford and Stillingfleet in the years 1740-1780 for marriages and marriage witnesses in the names of Hare and Fowler. That's the best way to build up a reliable FAN network - unless your man was a church warden - ...


6

It's very common for at least one child to have the mother's maiden name as a middle - it's a way of preserving a name that might otherwise be lost. I can't see I've ever seen a case where quite so many children have been given their mother's maiden name as a middle name before though! It can certainly be very useful in confirming that you've got the right ...


6

Via a Google Search, I found a page on the Family Search Wiki that has several reference articles on researching women ancestors. Information in this Wiki page is excerpted from the online course Research: Grandmothers, Mothers and Daughters-Tracing Women offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies. To learn more about this course or ...


6

Oooh, I like this question. And I have data to contribute! This data set is from the Israel Genealogy Research Association's "All Israel Database" (http://genealogy.org.il/AID/index.php) which, as of August 2015, covers over 576,000 records that were collected in, or chiefly about, the land of Israel in its Ottoman period, British Mandate period, and ...


6

Yes, in the Unites States in the eighteenth century you will tend to find more probate records for males than females. In his study, "Underregistration and Bias in Probate Records: An Analysis of Data From Eighteenth Century Hingham, Massachusetts", Daniel Scott Smith determined that less than 6% of women and 36% of men left wills. Similarly, inventories for ...


6

It's crucial that you get hold of the originals (or rather, images of them). I think you realise this by the fact that you say "Normally I would try to look up the original records". But because there can be so much extra information on the originals, it is pointless to proceed without them. Fortunately, the originals are available, though I'm not sure how ...


6

At that time, a suicide would not have been buried in consecrated ground. Suicide was both a sin and a criminal offence. Burial in consecrated ground was only permitted after 1823 without ritual, and with ritual only after the 1880 Burial Act, one description of which is found here. As the Church would have nothing to do with the burial of a suicide, ...


6

While the father may have been present or nearby for the births of his children, more likely, a female relative or a mid-wife actually assisted. Especially first births were likely to take the expectant mother to her mother's house, even if it was in a different place than the marital home. Your interpretation of "present at the birth" hinges on the final ...


6

They would have to pay the bond if they broke the terms of that bond. A bond, whether that be a probate bond, bastardy bond, marriage bond, etc., is simply a legal instrument by which people swear to forfeit a certain sum if they do not carry out or comply with the terms of that bond. Marriage bonds in the 1700s typically swore the groom and another one or ...


6

We probably can't prove that "Soldier Matthew" is the same as "Family Matthew", but we can seek to demonstrate that they are not the same person. If, for example, the military records show that Soldier Matthew was serving overseas at the time that Family Matthew got married, we would conclude that they were different men. The discharge record has a hand-...


6

The "y" is actually a thorn, so the text seems to read: July the 24th a girl that liveth with Stephen Dudderidge called Elizabeth. It is an unusual form of words though.


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