20

I note that Charles Thomas Gigg was baptised on 13 Feb 1887 at St James Norlands, Kensington. His mother is given as Hannah Sarah Gigg, of 5 Mary's Place, single: Source: Ancestry.co.uk, London, England, Church of England Births and Baptisms, 1813-1906 Whenever I have a case of a mother and illegitimate child vanishing without trace, my first thought is ...


15

Vilna is an old Russian name for Vilnius, the capital of Lithuania. It was also the name of Vilna Governate, a Russian territory that from 1795 to 1915 covered the south-east of modern Lithuania (and beyond into Belarus). So maybe we can start by assuming that Eiszuk was in the part of Russia that now Lithuania (this is just an assumption, it would be nice ...


9

The place is Ii - one of the shortest place names in Finland! Therefore it was often expressed more clearly as "Iin pitäjä(s)" which means roughly "Ii's parish" or "Ii's socken" (see e.g. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socken). It is easy to imagine that "Iin pitäjä" would transform to "Inpitaja" or Impitaja". The other forms "Impijas" etc. seem to be ...


9

An article at ohiohistory.org seems to have some clues as to where to look, and has some general information on the requirements in Ohio at that time. It appears your relative may have died during a transition period for death records in the state of Ohio. In July 1867, it became a statewide law to record deaths at the probate court of the county where ...


7

Georgia registration of deaths statewide began in 1919 and was generally complied with by 1922. But there may be records at the local level. Unfortunately, marriage records in Georgia didn't record the parents of the bride and groom, so you won't be able to find direct evidence of his father's name there. You may have to build a case using indirect ...


7

There is no such thing as a UK death certificate This question highlights a common misconception that the UK is more or less equivalent to England, but for genealogical purposes it is important to recognize the distinction. In 1908, the UK was the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, thus comprised of 4 countries: England, Wales, Scotland, and ...


6

I finally found one of them, under an area I thought I'd already checked but I now find there are a huge amount of un-indexed records there. These contain re-take fragments of other records mixed in with more normal sequences of books. And my family are listed on the pages p47, p66, p126, p131 as expected from the index. I haven't found 009 yet, but I'm ...


6

You can find the images for the marriage register on FamilySearch. Log in to FamilySearch and select Search > Catalog. Select "Search by Place" and type Massachusetts. Select "United States, Massachusetts" from the dropdown menu and click the Search button. In the search results, scroll down to "United States, Massachusetts - Vital records (n)" ...


5

One thing to bear in mind is that from 1904 onwards certificates tend to use euphemistic addresses for workhouses. As http://workhouses.org.uk/addresses/ explains the Registrar General directed that an "ordinary street address" be used. Initially that was only for births, and deaths only officially used the same addresses from 1920 onwards, but in practice ...


5

The informant on a death certificate has to be legally "qualified" to give the information. There is an order of precedence for qualification starting with a family relative, but can also, in a case like this, include the person in charge of the premises where the death took place. As you only want a certificate issued if a family member is the informant, ...


5

An England & Wales Death Certificate ordered from the General Register Office will contain a scanned image of the registrars written transcript. In more or less the same format as a Birth Certificate from the same period. The fields on an England & Wales Death Certificate from 1908 would have: 'No.' (The Reference Number) 'When and where died' (An ...


5

For deaths you can also check with the local historical society for the County, and see if they have any death indexes that might pre-date the official death certificates. I'm thinking earlier records might be your best bet. With no obit or death cert, I would start by looking for birth, marriage, or military records as your best chance of finding his name....


5

If I am correct the Charles Fredrick Evans as required by you is listed as a Gunner in the Royal Artillery. His service number was 1801591 and you could follow him up on line via Forces war records, if required for a fee. He is also listed under find a grave index, death 28 Feb 1945 and Listed with his mother Emma Elizabeth Evans, aged 42, when he was aged 7,...


5

I located the obituary for your great grandfather in the The San Francisco Call, dated 18 November 1908. This obituary mentions a different lodge: As you can see, in addition to some wonderful genealogical 'gold dust', this obituary mentions Germania lodge No. 1718 K. of H. (Knights of Honor). It is, of course, possible that Adam was a member of more than ...


5

The Marriage Act 1753, formally "An Act for the Better Preventing of Clandestine Marriage" ( and popularly known as Lord Hardwicke's Act), required that banns had to be called or a marriage licence obtained for a marriage to be legally valid. In fact this simply codified the existing practice within the Church of England into law. Under this statute the ...


5

You need to consult a historical gazetteer of Poland that takes into account the boundary changes with other countries over the years. https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/Poland_Gazetteers is a good starting point to identify a suitable gazetteer. Your document is from 1945 , so you're looking for a relatively recent gazetteer. I haven't checked in any of ...


5

It does seem that the province shown in your document for both the birthplace and the desired destination is "Śląsk". That is the polish word for the Silesia region of Poland which existed between 1742 and 1945. It is located in what now is southern Poland bordering with Germany and the Czech Republic. The town is likely Chorzów, which is not ...


4

My first port of call to find a cause of death would be a death certificate. As this person was a Scot and he died abroad this may not be as straightforward as it seems. Fortunately McMillan appears in the GRO Consular Death Index: Consular Deaths 1906-1910 MCMILLAN, James, 47, Nagasaki, p 1599 The British Consular BMD indexes can be viewed for free ...


4

If Andrew had emigrated from Poland, then his original surname quite probably was "Świder". By simply dropping diacritics we get "Swider". Someone who would care for phonetics, could make "Shwider" out of "Świder" so this spelling is also possible.


4

Google actually have a special search engine for US patents at https://www.google.co.uk/advanced_patent_search but it doesn't seem to have much luck finding this one. A bit of fiddling reveals that each patent has a URL based on it's number though, and I believe https://www.google.co.uk/patents/US804529 is what you're looking for: Be it known that I ...


4

To my eye the two samples you have pointed out seem to read "Un" for unknown. I suggest you look for other instances on the surrounding pages, and then look in other record groups for those individuals to see if you can determine their birth months. Remember that in 1900 we do not have any information about who gave the information to the census taker. ...


4

Best guess: Milejkava (Мілэйкава), Belarus -- which was also known as Mileykovo, Grodno Gubernia (province), Russian Empire. Russian town names that end in -kovo were sometimes written as -kow, and this town is not far from the modern-day Polish border where they would use -kow. There's a Belarusian page in Wikipedia for the town, but little other English ...


4

I believe the word is oriunda, meaning native to Granada. The dot on the i has strayed forward a little and the minims are difficult to differentiate. The word also appears in the entry above and is somewhat more clear there.


4

It looks to me like she was at her parents house for the 1901 census and was (wrongly) enumerated under her maiden name as Ann E Campbell and also as single... If you don't have ancestry the reference is: Class: RG13; Piece: 3374; Folio: 98; Page: 26


4

It looks like "About" (compare it with the same word in the next column), which would make the entry read: Glasgow, Scotland. About 4 years, Victoria; 29 years, South Australia; 14 days, N.S.Wales.


4

My best guess for the original is the 1901 Census in Lewisham, Class: RG13; Piece: 545; Folio: 107; Page: 10. Here is a clipping from that page: The original text for Henry's occupation is rather obscured, The first word does look like "Folder", but the second does not look like "Worker", rather something ending in "...work". So the transcriber may have ...


4

The 1904 banns may have still been regarded as valid (and it would be for the officiating vicar to decide, if the marriage was to take place in a CofE church) - but there are a number of other possible scenarios to consider. The 1907 marriage reference is only an index and doesn't indicate whether the marriage took place in a church or in a registration ...


3

The city of Oulu Finland is located in Northern Finland within the region of Northern Ostrobothnia, Finland. I searched modern names of the different areas looking for "Impijats" "Impitaja", "Impijas" or something similar in different areas of the city, lakes, rivers and was not able to locate it browsing Google Maps of the city itself or the surrounding ...


3

The term domestic in a census record is very likely to refer to occupations that are associated with working in a household. For an example, see this passage from Melanie Buddle's book The Business of Women: Marriage, Family, and Entrepreneurship in British Columbia, 1901-51, page 29: ...British Columbia had a large Asian population: at the end of the ...


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