We changed our privacy policy. Read more.
17

The name is Agnes. You can compare each of the letters to those shown in this BYU Script Tutorial for German handwriting. I extracted the relevant letters from the alphabet image on that site, and put them together in one image. I've included your image below for easy comparison.


15

It says "Leeds in the County of York"


11

I suspect that your Martha and Pattie are the same people. It is known for nicknames / pet names to be used on the British census - not as a matter of course, but it's not unknown. The "What's In a Name" web-site has an entry for Pattie indicating that it can be used as a pet-name for Martha. It suggests that "areas of the southern United States, pre-1776, ...


11

Based on the following the photo is by H. Richers who operated from at least 1878 to 1913 in Hannover (the link has his street address). Looking at the ears, chin, eye sockets, nose and mouth features I would say it is the same person and both photos look like they may have even been taken the same day in a single sitting with slight change of styling of ...


10

Annoying...! I think the word is "Indep", meaning "Independent", as in "Of Independent means". "I" and "J" do seem to be very similar in many hands and I'm not sure what to say the difference is. I've just looked through this census book and can't see any other use of a capital "I", and of course found several "J" for "Jane", etc., that look very similar. ...


10

I can't read the script yet. But we can say what it meant - if you look at the vertical annotation to the right, it explains that the registrations were cancelled because the qualification of the informant was not stated. Births and deaths in the English / Welsh registration system, and apparently the Irish I see from the image here, can only be reported by ...


9

Most countries have what was called a "Union List of Newspapers", published by their National Library. These are now being migrated to online catalogues and databases. As SOLLOGHODMORE is in Tipperary a search of this database on The National Library of Ireland website should help: https://www.nli.ie/en/catalogues-and-databases-printed-newspapers.aspx. For ...


8

Coverage of the birth registrations on FreeBMD is given in "Coverage Charts - Births" - these look complete for the years around 1884. However, I am unclear how well the data in Ancestry reflects that on the FreeBMD site. It is possible that the Ancestry data is an older version and not as complete. You probably appreciate perfectly well that the FreeBMD ...


8

Ancestry.com's about the database article for the 1810 United States Federal Census asserts: Partial losses included Illinois Territory, which had only two counties (Randolph is extant, St. Clair is lost.), and OH, all lost except Washington County. If the Washington County, Ohio schedules exist, then how can we find the schedules? Failing that, how ...


8

If they were catholic or protestant Statistically (based location, given names and surname), as ethnic Poles and living in rural Upper Silesia, your great-great-grandparents were Catholic. (Catholics used a much broader range of given names than the Lutherans). This assumption would be confirmed or refuted in the microfilmed church records. Dates and ...


8

I wanted to address a point that originally came up in the comments to bgwiehle's answer. Places are known by different names throughout their history. If a place was called by a particular name during the time the Nazis were in power, it may not be acceptable to use that name in a social setting, for obvious reasons. However, as historians and researchers ...


8

To answer the question about baptising sickly children - yes, absolutely. The Church of England has an abbreviated form of the Order (i.e service) of Baptism to be used in homes etc. in such circumstances. Such baptisms are generally known as Private baptisms and may be marked with a letter P in the register. Remember that there were once those who were ...


8

While the exact diagnosis is almost certainly impossible without data from elsewhere that probably doesn't exist, we should at least attempt to see how the words were used at that time. Anyone familiar with UK censuses, will know that a number of them have in the final column, a question similar to "If (1) Deaf-and-Dumb, (2) Blind (3) Lunatic, Imbecile or ...


8

Paralysis. Determining the underlying cause is pure speculation, but suffice it to say that the person had some sort of neurologic disorder. Causes could range from trauma to infectious or inflammatory disease, and everything in between. A useful source to identify causes of death on old death certificates is Antiquus Morbus. For paralysis, it states: Palsy....


8

The rules had been set out in Hardwicke's Marriage Act 1753. The Act required that, for a marriage to be valid, it had to be performed in a church and either after the publication of banns or the obtaining of a licence. If the marriage was by licence, those under the age of 21 had to prove parental consent before the licence was issued. If the marriage was ...


7

One possible avenue of research is to look for Naturalization records. You have the certificate and you know the court which issued it. The National Archives' introductory section on finding Naturalization records is here: http://www.archives.gov/research/naturalization/#find For records prior to 1906, they say: "Contact the State Archives for the state ...


7

1) I can't imagine a young couple with 3 young children leaving their homeland if he was not in good health. Right. So first check ship's records, both departures from Germany and arrivals in the USA to see if they actually did come. 2) Even if this was the case, he would have not been allowed into the USA, due to his health. Many arrival ports ...


7

I agree that a second marriage is the most likely explanation. Snyder/Snider is not much of a difference. Do you have any further records for the elder children, Alice and Edward, such as their marriages or deaths? That may show the name of their mother. Maybe they will mention their possible stepmother (Martha) rather than Mary Green/Greer, but given ...


7

I think your "Lauraine" is Lausanne, which is a city in the canton of Vaud, Switzerland. (There is also the French region of Lorraine, if someone's understanding of European geography was especially bad). Stukey may not have been the original European spelling - Geogen doesn't find any matches in current German-language telephone directories. However Stuckey ...


7

This answer provides some historical context, but does not completely answer the question. Baden & Württemberg experienced large emigrations in the 1820s to 1850s, to Hungary (recruited by Austria-Hungary to re-settle lands recovered from the Ottomans, in the Banat and Transylvania) and to North and South America. The aftermath of the Napoleonic wars ...


7

This was fun and here is my current theory, which I believe supports your hypothesis. The style of clothes are 1860s style per the vintage style guides listed further below and in the 1870s styles seemed to have moved significantly away from the style pictured. In particular away from the particulars of his frock coat, colors worn, as well as more patterns ...


7

A lot of what I have been able to determine can be eloborated on this page. Note: I will add the caveat that I personally am not a Mason, but several generations of my ancestors, including living, are known to be Masons but my interaction with the organization so far has been limited. What seems like another good general resource on US Mason, but not for ...


7

Tin Pedlar - that is, an itinerant trader of tin.


7

First, have your looked in Nørresundby Kirkebøger (churchbooks) for their marriage (Viede)? Was your father a first child? Or were there older children? That has a bearing on your timeline. (Consider looking for a marriage date up to and including 1884.) Looking in Nørresundby would be the obvious first step. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to get into ...


7

Registers were indeed compiled at the individual child level. Survivals (of registers!) are patchy - what there is, seems to be in county record offices. See http://www.genguide.co.uk/source/vaccination-registers-amp-certificates/51/ for one article. In the articles that I've read, I don't remember seeing much advantage to these registers, even if you find ...


7

It could be 'Szemiński' (that's male form, female would be 'Szemińska') but that's quite an approximate guess. Things to consider is that 19th Century Warsaw had at different times, Prussian, Polish, Russian and again Polish local administration which along with it had different language and spellings. Also for consideration Warsaw at the time had only ...


7

First, investigate the birth registrations (using the GRO website -- free but you do have to register) for Margaret Amy Williams and Margaret Ann Williams in the June and September quarters in 1899 (both quarters because she was born so close to the June quarter end) and compare the maiden names of the mother with the maiden names of Frederick Williams to ...


7

Consider that the "mother-in-law" could actually be a stepmother. It would not be unusual for those two terms to be used interchangeably. Also consider that mistakes happen, and it may not have been the head of household who gave the information to the census enumerator. If the wife gave the information, then she may have quite correctly described ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible