18

The National Archives published a guidance note in 2009: Copying of birth, death, marriage and civil partnership certificates (pdf). It covers the terms under which the image of a certificate from the GRO and the other UK registries can be copied. An extract: Reproduction You are authorised to reproduce the layout of the form in any format including on the ...


18

Your tree should still be accessible and editable. See this Ancestry.com faq answer: Once you have cancelled your subscription with Ancestry, you will still be able to sign in to the account with your username and password as a Registered Guest. You will still be able to build your tree, see if you have new hints, and search any of the free databases ...


17

Using a commercial site will give access to more records (since they can usually afford to have more records transcribed) and you'll have access to them from one place (thus voiding having to visit many different sites). However, no one site (commercial or otherwise) has all records available. Hence, subscribing to a big commercial site is not going to ...


14

The San Francisco Call (among other papers) is available online at the California Digital Newspaper Collection. The copyright blurb on that site says All newspapers published before January 1, 1923 are in the public domain and therefore have no restrictions on use. If publishing, quoting from, or otherwise reproducing the images from this collection, we ...


14

The selector you're using (.iconLeafImageSize1.iconLeafImage.icon) is definitely still the one they use on ancestry's site. I'm not sure why the filter that was working previously in AdblockPro is no longer working (I tried adding it myself but was also unable to get it to work). If your aim is just to take screenshots, you can still achieve this without ...


13

Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer, you are not my client. Your rights regarding clippings found on Ancestry.com and similar content-providing sites are limited by Terms of Service first, copyright second; their Terms of Service may limit your rights even if the clipping is free of copyright. Once you know the clipping exists, it may be relatively easy to locate ...


12

The RG13, piece=3167, folio=85, page=19 reference reflects the archival arrangement of the census collections at The National Archives, so is the well established convention. However, it is based on microfilm records and Ancestry's records are digital images. The original Census Enumerators Books (CEBs) were arranged by 'registration/adminstration county', ...


12

Fortunately it is not possible to incorporate large amounts of data from someone else's tree on Ancestry.com without going through it individual by individual. This slows – but far from eliminates – the rate of: plagiarism: taking someone else's work and passing it off as your own perpetuating false information: many public trees on Ancestry are poorly ...


11

You can do this in Visual Chartform (The Master Genealogist). Use the List of People report to create a temporary dataset that includes only those individuals in the direct line (filter for 'is an ancestor of X and is a descendant of Y'). Then run the Ancestor Box Chart (with the option to include siblings) against that temporary data set. There is an ...


11

You need Ancestry's Old Search. OK - I know, how do you get to that? (I keep forgetting, so assume others will). Go to option Search/Search All Records and at the right hand side, beneath the menu bar, there's the tiny script "Go to Old Search". Then just search the censuses using the Advanced Search.


11

The Ancestry blog posting "External APIs: To Explode, or Not to Explode, That is the Question" in 2014 says that there is an external API: Ancestry.com (the bastion of family history) has an external API that is used by our mobile apps and other strategic initiatives to share and update a person’s family tree, events, stories and photos. Our ...


10

Yes, your tree remains pretty much forever. I've canceled and resubscribed several times and never lost any data.


10

What has to be understood is that the Ancestry Member Tree feature is a display application and not really a genealogy program. Thus the GEDCOM it generates for download is a non-standard 'flavor' of GEDCOM. When saving a census document to a Member Tree, it is saved as a Residence event. If you want a Census Event, you must create it manually and then ...


10

There are two elements to your question and they need to be dealt with separately. Ancestry changed your GEDCOM And almost any other application package would have done so, too. Not always in the same way and sometimes you may not notice the change, but it will happen. GEDCOM is now an aging standard and software developers have added their own extensions ...


10

You're definitely on the right track in terms of possible relationships (cross referencing the cM counts you gave with the ones http://thegeneticgenealogist.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Shared-cM-Project-Version-2-UPDATED-1.pdf does indeed suggest a 2C / 2C1R or comparable relationship). It sounds as if you understand everything correctly so far - it's ...


9

Since this question was originally asked, Ancestry has not changed the policy quoted in Gene Golovchinsky's answer. Your tree remains intact, including the links to the content you've attached to your tree -- as long as the content is still on Ancestry. However, if Ancestry removes content, you won't have access to a copy of that material anymore. Some ...


9

What you're asking to do isn't a correction, but an annotation based on information you know from other sources. Ancestry have correctly transcribed the record: The census enumerator omitted information by describing her as "wife", rather than "wife of boarder", but changing it at this stage is adding a subjective opinion. Ancestry does allow surnames to ...


9

[1] Tree sizes (without an active subscription) if you have a tree owner's user name, you can access their profile page*. Often, the names and people counts of their public trees are listed. The profile may include other personal information or uploaded items that may help you access their interest in your family line. *Profile pages can be found by ...


9

A family tree without source citations is fiction. I assume the information you have included in your question is from a user submitted Ancestry family tree. Typically such trees have no source citations. At best, some might contain accurate information, so use them only a clues after you have exhausted documentary sources both online and offline. It ...


9

To complement the previous answer -- sites do exist where people have shared their GEDCOM files for download. Here are some things to consider if you could download the entire tree. 'Best practice' is to NOT merge their entire tree with yours, but to keep it separate and to use it as a reference because: Some sites which allow users to upload trees don't ...


9

Yes, Ancestry has an API. No, it is not public. Ancestry so far is making it available to only a select few. On December 9, 2015, Ancestry stated that they are "exploring possible relationships with other desktop software solutions that would make it possible for their products to integrate with Ancestry". So other software may get access to the API in ...


8

The Legal Genealogist recently blogged on the topic of copyright and newspapers. However, you should also consult the terms and conditions of the website where you got the clipping. How do you intend to distribute it and how many copies do you want to make? Copyright prevents copying without permission, so you could ask for permission.


8

The real question here is "When does a copyright expire?" About.com summarizes the situation in the US with this table: Published before 1923 - now in public domain Published from 1923 to 1963 - When published with a copyright notice © or "Copyright [dates] by [author/owner]" - copyright protection lasts 28 years and could be renewed for an ...


8

I don't know the actual reason for the switch over but this is entirely wrong and shouldn't have happened. A census is - as you say - an "event". It has both a place and a date associated with it. It should, therefore, be recorded as an event. To use the census address as a residential address is an error because many people were not present at their ...


8

User fbrereto asks about how to use Ancestry.com to share a conclusion that is based not on proof, but on "some accounts." I interpret "some accounts" to mean there exist some sources (including some family tradition) that reports about this sixth child, but that proof is lacking. Fundamentals See Elizabeth Shown Mills, Evidence Explained ..., 2007 (p. ...


8

Although you should always begin with your last confirmed direct ancestor then work back from him (or her) and definitely NOT try to work forward from the "possible" link to nobility; you may gain some insights from analysing the plausibility of the ancient family first. The situation of two brothers with titles and two without suggests that either two ...


8

You can't trust anything you find in Ancestry.com user trees What Sue Adams said, and then some. It's a pretty strong statement, I know, but hear me out. I think the most common scenario for user trees on Ancestry.com is this: someone takes their family Bible or their great-aunt Ida's handwritten list of birthdates and marriages, and enters it into an ...


8

Ancestry.com's about the database article for the 1810 United States Federal Census asserts: Partial losses included Illinois Territory, which had only two counties (Randolph is extant, St. Clair is lost.), and OH, all lost except Washington County. If the Washington County, Ohio schedules exist, then how can we find the schedules? Failing that, how ...


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