14

The selector you're using (.iconLeafImageSize1.iconLeafImage.icon) is definitely still the one they use on ancestry's site. I'm not sure why the filter that was working previously in AdblockPro is no longer working (I tried adding it myself but was also unable to get it to work). If your aim is just to take screenshots, you can still achieve this without ...


12

Fortunately it is not possible to incorporate large amounts of data from someone else's tree on Ancestry.com without going through it individual by individual. This slows – but far from eliminates – the rate of: plagiarism: taking someone else's work and passing it off as your own perpetuating false information: many public trees on Ancestry are poorly ...


12

The Ancestry blog posting "External APIs: To Explode, or Not to Explode, That is the Question" in 2014 says that there is an external API: Ancestry.com (the bastion of family history) has an external API that is used by our mobile apps and other strategic initiatives to share and update a person’s family tree, events, stories and photos. Our ...


10

Yes, Ancestry has an API. No, it is not public. Ancestry so far is making it available to only a select few. On December 9, 2015, Ancestry stated that they are "exploring possible relationships with other desktop software solutions that would make it possible for their products to integrate with Ancestry". So other software may get access to the API in ...


10

You're definitely on the right track in terms of possible relationships (cross referencing the cM counts you gave with the ones http://thegeneticgenealogist.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Shared-cM-Project-Version-2-UPDATED-1.pdf does indeed suggest a 2C / 2C1R or comparable relationship). It sounds as if you understand everything correctly so far - it's ...


9

Since this question was originally asked, Ancestry has not changed the policy quoted in Gene Golovchinsky's answer. Your tree remains intact, including the links to the content you've attached to your tree -- as long as the content is still on Ancestry. However, if Ancestry removes content, you won't have access to a copy of that material anymore. Some ...


9

To complement the previous answer -- sites do exist where people have shared their GEDCOM files for download. Here are some things to consider if you could download the entire tree. 'Best practice' is to NOT merge their entire tree with yours, but to keep it separate and to use it as a reference because: Some sites which allow users to upload trees don't ...


9

I had my 93 year old uncle take a test after he agreed to do it. I did not feel comfortable asking him to do it, or for me to attempt to administer it. My uncle was at a nursing home. I asked one of the health care aids to administer it. My uncle trusted the aid and even though he was uncomfortable for a few seconds, the aid knew how to handle it and it ...


8

Each entities lab's time are different and it also depends on what test you perform. This is due to them queuing up tests into large scale batches to use shared labs since many do not have their own lab with the exception of FamilyTreeDNA. The general process for the tests appears to be the following which is important to understand when examining ...


8

Go to edit person below their name. Go to Relationships. Click on "Add Alternative Parent".


8

Ancestry.com's about the database article for the 1810 United States Federal Census asserts: Partial losses included Illinois Territory, which had only two counties (Randolph is extant, St. Clair is lost.), and OH, all lost except Washington County. If the Washington County, Ohio schedules exist, then how can we find the schedules? Failing that, how ...


8

Go to the Card Catalog and search by collection title or keyword, to locate a specific record set. Clicking on the title UK, American Loyalist Claims, 1776-1835 will bring you to a dedicated search page where you can restrict your search to only that database. You can also go to a specific record set in the results of a general search by clicking the "...


8

The ISOGG Wiki's article on Autosomal DNA statistics explains the concepts in the previous answer in much more detail -- and includes links to the AncestryDNA white paper that explains Ancestry's matching algorithm. Humans have 22 pairs of chromosomes plus the X/Y chromosomes. Assuming nothing went awry when the chromosomes were sorted out in the ...


8

Errors of this magnitude are possible but very very rare. I'm sorry I don't have the documentation but there was discussion on at least one of the lists/groups for genetic genealogy about a case where an AncestryDNA customer was told that someone matched her as a parent. Huge surprise. Turned out to be a bizarre error and the two people weren't even ...


8

She's right: If you didn't take the photographs personally, you don't own the copyright and can't prevent her publishing them. The person who took the photograph (and so originally owned the copyright) could, or the person/people who inherited the copyright for up to 70 years after the photographer's death (in the US: terms elsewhere will vary). If the ...


7

You can export your tree as a GEDCOM file. In Ancestry click "Family Trees", then choose "Manage tree" for the appropriate tree. This takes you to the "Tree Settings" page. Scroll down to the bottom right of the page, and there is a button to "Export Tree"


7

In April 2016, as far as I am aware, the Family Group Sheet view has not been reinstated on the New Ancestry. However, you can access a Family Group Sheet as before by using the following URL structure: http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/TREE_ID/family/familygroup?fpid=PERSON_ID You can find the TREE_ID and PERSON_ID by looking at the URL when you are on an ...


7

I maintain a Word document (over 260 pages now) that lists all of the events (births, deaths, marriages, etc.) of my direct ancestors in chronological order. As part of that document, I include all of the theories, guesses, and hypotheses associated with familial connections (possible but unproven relationships, lists of potential candidates for parents or ...


7

The result should be reliable in that it shows a close relationship. As shown on the Autosomal DNA statistics page on the ISOGG Wiki, the relationship is almost certainly one of these: one of you is half-sibling of the other one of you is aunt or uncle of the other one of you is grandparent of the other one of you is double-first-cousin of the other Some ...


7

You're starting off with a doozy of a match. Yep, something's going on here. Let's start with the shared cM project. Looking at the total cM match only, your possibilities for a 1,193 cM match include: Great grandparent (range 464-1486) Grandparent (1156-2311) Half aunt/uncle (500-1446) Great aunt/uncle (251-2108) 1st cousin (553-1225) We can rule out ...


7

My first step was to look for the births of children registered with the surname Harris and the mother's maiden name of Earley from 1911 onwards, using the GRO indices. I found 4: Cyril Alexander Harris 1913M quarter Cardiff Austin Harris 1914S quarter Cardiff Esme Harris 1916D quarter Llanelly Jeanie Harris 1918S quarter Llanelly (The GRO indices with ...


6

It is possible that the GenBridge technology, developed by WhollyGenes - the maker of The Master Genealogist can read those files. The reason why I believe so is that Wholly Genes developed GenBridge quite a number of years ago to read in the formats available at the time, but haven't updated it. Tamura Jones writes that GenBridge supports FTW, FTM and FBK ...


6

IT'S VERY EASY TO CHANGE RESIDENCE TO CENSUS I agree that Residence should be used when something other than a census places the person at a particular place at a particular time - directories, yearbooks, military information, etc. Census should be used when the information comes directly from a census. After exporting a GEDCOM file from either Ancestry....


6

My understanding is that such a feature does not currently exist in Ancestry.com. Every time I am asked to complete a customer feedback survey from Ancestry.com this is at the top of my list of new features that I would like to see. Ancestry.com does have a feature called Search By Location: Ancestry allows you to search for records for an ancestor from ...


6

In response to the comment about there being no third party app to download the Media (pictures and stories). Now there is a Chrome extension. Not an amazing one, but at least something. It uses screen scraping, so there is no guarantee how long it will work for, but it is free. You can find it on my blog here. Similar to neRok's answer, there is a ...


6

Just a note that you should not automatically jump to the conclusion that you and your probably-half-sibling must share a father instead of a mother; young unmarried pregnant women were often pressured to give away their babies and never speak of it again. Your DNA results should be able to show whether you two specifically share an X chromosome match or ...


6

I suspect you are referring mainly to the GRO indexes for England & Wales. If so, the wrong county attributions have been there for years, probably close to a decade, and no attempts been made to correct it. I believe the errors occurred because when the database was originally set up, the volume numbers were used to predict the county. Hereford ...


6

The family tree of ancestors is a binary tree (although as you move up, you will start to see nodes that are identical -- this is pedigree collapse). So if you think of each ancestor as making an equivalent "contribution", then yes, the total contribution from ancestors from one places should be a dyadic rational number. But Ancestry is determining ...


6

I finally found one of them, under an area I thought I'd already checked but I now find there are a huge amount of un-indexed records there. These contain re-take fragments of other records mixed in with more normal sequences of books. And my family are listed on the pages p47, p66, p126, p131 as expected from the index. I haven't found 009 yet, but I'm ...


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