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A ship's carpenter was responsible for building the hull of the ship, the masts, etc. Any type of carpenter (joiner) would be eligible for membership in a guild (of joiners), but would not be obligated to join. A journeyman means that they are beyond their apprenticeship and are free to work unsupervised and charge their own daily or weekly fees. He may or ...


4

The basic principle in studying family history is always to start what you know and work outwards from there in small increments. If you have a street address from the 1881 Census, or at least a district, the first thing I would do is look into the history of London street re-numbering -- I would not assume that any historical address that I found could be ...


4

Firstly, Phthisis was the old name of tuberculosis, so your suggestion on that is correct. In the 1800s, what we now always call science was more commonly known as natural philosophy. So a scientific instrument and a philosophical instrument would have been the same thing. Such instruments at that time would almost certainly have fallen into one of three ...


3

@JanMurphy has provided some useful suggestions for trying to locate Matthew in this census. However, the unfortunate truth is that the 1861 census has been well-indexed on many sites now, so the pessimist in me says that as you and others have done an extensive search for him it is unlikely you will find him anywhere on this census. This answer looks at ...


3

General information about apprenticeships can be found on the National Archives website: Looking for records of an apprentice or master. This index on FindMyPast was derived from the Stamp Duty registers, held by the National Archives in series IR 1. The images from which the index was derived can be viewed for free on the National Archives website, by ...


2

The Statute of Apprentices of 1563 made it illegal for anyone to enter specified trades without having served an apprenticeship. I use the word "specified" here, as one of the reasons for the eventual decline of the apprenticeship system under the 1563 rules was the emergence of trades outside the scope of the 1563 Act - which implies there was a specific ...


2

By the nineteenth century, formal apprenticeship was becoming much less common. Compulsory apprenticeship ended in 1844. The 'apprenticeship path' for Matthew Nettell was therefore likely an informal agreement between friends or relatives to learn the trade. Records for informal apprenticeships rarely survive. Parish apprenticeship, typically of poor ...


2

I can only suggest that you try the possibly lengthy process of looking in the catalogues of the National Records of Scotland (former National Archives of Scotland) and any local archives for Glasgow. I am not optimistic, however. "Tracing Your Scottish Ancestors: The Official Guide", published by the NRS, has a set of paragraphs on apprentices but I saw ...


2

Strategy 1: Use maps and gazetteers to help identify nearby places to Illogan, and look for blacksmiths in those places to find who might be a master to an apprentice. Nearby places tools can be found at: Curious Fox GENUKI Historical Maps at FamilySearch Strategy 2: Look for the types of records likely to mention boys of that age -- not just for ...


1

I think I may have lucked out on this search. I found this book: Irish Furniture: Woodwork and Carving in Ireland from the Earliest Times to ... A quick look in the appendix shows an alphabetical listing of Irish cabinet makers; some in the 1700's. The actual book looks pretty interesting; I might get one for myself. You can find out more about the book ...


1

The Three United Trades of Dundee is the website for the relevant guild in Dundee. The Wrights was apparently the one to cover joiners - other places may divide the trades differently, and the Wrights were themselves split up. I have not checked to see what the site holds. This may give at least some inspiration. Note that qualification to trade in Dundee ...


1

'Well in Scotland as with England, and the rest of the UK. A person would require to be a Freeman, as the eldest son of a Freeman or else to have become a Freeman, by Marriage to the Eldest daughter of a Freeman or the Widow of Freeman or else by serving an Apprenticeship usual of seven years to a Freeman or the Widow of Freeman in this instance as a Joiner. ...


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