8

When I have viewed documents at a Family History Center or FamilySearch Affiliate Library in the past I was able to view and download most documents for future access at home. I believe there are some reasonable restrictions on the number of images that can be downloaded, to prevent an entire film from being downloaded, however you are unlikely to reach this ...


6

Kew's recommendations for citing their documents are on the page "Citing documents in The National Archives". In particular, they say: "In long full citation one of the following will suffice: "The National Archives (TNA) "The National Archives of the UK (TNA)" Anyone who read that page some time ago, may remember references to additionally citing the ...


6

I welcome your plan to preserve the diaries and make them available to others. If the relative already gave you the diaries, there is some common ground to discuss the other resources. Scanning them is surely not negated and doing so would be my priority. Then you could ask if she is planning to give the documents and photos away somewhen and to whom. ...


5

Using the catalog reference for Alfred and Emily's marriage as a clue, I moved to the next image on Ancestry and looked at the top right corner of the following page: I started from the catalog entry for Alfred and Emily's marriage, which was WO 69/554/30, looked below at the grey box marked Context of this record, and chose the link to Browse by Reference....


5

The closest thing I know of that meets your criteria is WorldCat's beta project ArchiveGrid. It has a feature FIND ARCHIVES NEAR YOU which allows you to search for a location or zip code, or pick out a library or archive via a pin on the map. A pop-up box offers you the choice of searching the collection or getting contact information for that facility. ...


5

The (US) National Archives does have a guide to Citing Records in the National Archives of the United States (pdf). For paper documents, they expect you to mention which regional building it is in, and for electronic documents it should be "National Archives and Records Administration" (NARA). Having said that, they call themselves "US National Archives" ...


4

I found one of the three (SHBG/149/013) under "Miscellaneous" of course after digging around for a while longer. I'm glad I previously noticed the LMA sticker on the 149/11 book - I knew to look for it this time. I found it made more sense to browse from the four poor law categories which have their own dedicated search pages. I came to suspect that the ...


4

This question has two related parts - one to do with digitization of these records, and the other where the records should be archived. If possible, I would consider digitizing the records yourself. After having a digital record of the items, an archive, museum, or library is absolutely the best place for long-term preservation of these items. While an ...


4

This is a really common problem, so I thought I'd write some more about how I have approached it in my own research. First: you need to know where your immigrant ancestor really came from, not just where they sailed from. Some places to look: Passenger lists (sometimes give a place of origin), as you found US naturalization applications (sometimes give the ...


4

I hope you can read German, several websites are in German language. first starting point could be: http://stolp.stadt-stolp.de/ On that page, you find under "Nr 10" an indication of marriages in that time frame you mentioned. There is literature linked to that; maybe you could contact the city of Granzin today (in Poland) to check that literature or their ...


4

It looks to me that the sub-collection number is 3.1.3 (Emigrations), based on the fact that the example shows three dot-separated numbers. However, upon scrolling up on the list, it seems to be 3.1.3.2 (Passenger lists and further compilations on emigrated persons) The document ID is the Reference Code 81740087 as the help page states: When you open the ...


4

Since FamilySearch's catalog description was written, the US National Archives (NARA) has replaced the OPA system with the new Catalog. What you want for this purpose are the electronic passenger list databases, which are at NARA's AAD (Access to Archival Databases) website. From the AAD home page, look for where it says "Browse by Category" and then "...


4

The "Germans to America" books were created by indexing passenger lists and filtering the results by ethnicity or origin before publishing. The series predates the internet, starting abt 1988. The books are simply text, no images. Gen-Wiki states: The book series Germans to America is up to volume 60 now. This series indexes passenger arrival lists ...


3

Not a specific answer to your trip question but this may assist. You could try contacting the Huguenot Society to see if they have anything on the arrival of your Jacques's in the UK. Their records may be able to help formulate a plan for your research trip.


3

You'll need to contact FamilySearch Support and provide the IP address(es) for the library. Please see this article: https://www.familysearch.org/ask/salesforce/viewArticle?urlname=Affiliate-Library-needs-access-to&lang=en When it is working properly, a user can be using a library computer, and sign on to Familysearch.org with their own personal ID. (...


3

The article Restrictions on viewing an image in historical records says, for the status message These images are viewable: To signed-in members of supporting organizations when they use the site > at a family history center. Who Can View: If the patrons use a family history center computer or a computer at an affiliate public library, ...


3

You have to transcribe it, and publish those transcriptions. Such diaries are like gold dust and have to be shared, as you say. Scanning will help preserve the the written form but sharing needs a textual form. They will undoubtedly reference other people, and for those references to be found by other researchers then you need transcriptions. Google cannot ...


3

Judy G. Russell, who writes the blog "The Legal Genealogist", has given a webinar That First Trip to the Courthouse which is an hour-long presentation on how to prepare for a courthouse trip, and what kinds of records that you might find there. Her webinar is available to members of the Florida State Genealogical Society, where she presented it last fall, ...


2

The questions of whether the records still belong to the United Ancient Order of Druids, and how to find a more permanent home for these records, are two related questions, which could be summed up together as Where do these records belong? If I had records of a similar nature for the United States, to answer the legal question of where these records ...


2

They might be kept in few other places. Please note that I didn't do real research about that, just a quick google search. It's just a hint that might or might not lead to something. Unfortunately, the vast majority of Russian archives are not digitized, even catalogs with descriptions are not always available on the Internet. Instead of writing to archives ...


1

There are several issues with the accuracy of enlistments for WW1. Firstly they may not have filled in the forms themselves and this was probably done by a ? corporal and witnessed by an officer. Time was short and there were thousands of men to enlist so mistakes were bound to happen. Most men by 1914 could read and write, some better than others.(ref ...


1

I've done research on Jacques Hoste from Middelburg, see https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Hoste-114. Didn't find much about his father. I'm interested in him since I was born in Middelburg and my name is Hoste. My ancestors are from Zeeuws-Vlaanderen, not far from Middelburg.


1

I would suggest the Internet Archive as a good permanent online home for these sorts of things. You can include lots of metadata, and easily link to and from other places on the web. The IA is a non-profit organisation that aims at long-term preservation of digital items. If someone makes a copyright claim against one of your items, it may be taken down — ...


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