5

The first thing is to narrow down the location that he died. This can be rather tricky, but there's a few ways to do it. Considering it's in the 1800's, you have a lot of options. Generally speaking, here's what you do. Try to compile as accurate of a timeline as you can. Find the last date that you have a record for. Census is a good start, use tax records ...


5

While it's possible that your father wasn't recorded in the 1920 census, there are a lot of avenues of research to follow which might let you find where he was recorded. First, since he's your father you know he was definitely alive in 1920. Second, you know that his family was split up in 1920, with his father living in one place and his mother in another ...


5

Sometimes people were just missed in a census. If the enumerator talked to a neighbor instead of the actual family, it's possible that the family or the neighbor were new to the neighborhood and didn't know the family well enough. This happens even now; when the 2000 census was being taken, my mom's neighbor didn't want to be counted. An enumerator was ...


5

Many of the online guides on US Vital Records give an overview of what information may be on the death certificates. Some examples for Arkansas: Ancestry's About the Database for its database Arkansas Death Index, 1914-1950, citing Johni Cerny, "Research in Birth, Death, and Cemetery Records," The Source: A Guidebook of American Genealogy, ed. Loretto ...


4

To my eye the two samples you have pointed out seem to read "Un" for unknown. I suggest you look for other instances on the surrounding pages, and then look in other record groups for those individuals to see if you can determine their birth months. Remember that in 1900 we do not have any information about who gave the information to the census taker. ...


4

The 1880 Enumerator instructions, which can be viewed at ipums.org, say: Wherever an institution is to be enumerated, as a hospital, an asylum, an alms-house, a jail, or a penitentiary, the enumerator will leave three lines blank, and enter the name of the institution (as "St. Mary's Hospital," "Protestant Orphan Asylum," "Insane Asylum," "City ...


3

Although it's a bit of long shot, you might also want to try the Orphan's Court records (or Surrogate's Court, or whatever it's called in Arkansas) for the county she lived in. I say long shot because most of the Orphan's Court records I've seen deal with guardianship and protecting childrens' inheritances from the surviving parent (and others). I don't ...


3

Orphanages were enumerated in the 1880 census. I tried "orphanage" as keyword at 1880 United States Federal Census and got 40 results, but none in Arkansas. Most results matched "orphanage" in the occupation field, but linked census images had many child boarders or students. Creative searching using related keywords may find more results. In later ...


2

One of the job titles in the legal profession is Advocate. In some regions, the abbreviation Adv is suffixed to a lawyer's name to indicate this position. Other similar expressions would be JP (Justice of the Peace). I'm not sure of the practice of Arkansas but the use of Adv in this case suggests that the individual was a legal Advocate. As the ...


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