6

I was thinking perhaps the second initial was a "T", so I did a quick search of the South Australian BDM index (run by GenealogySA) and found a P. T. (Patrick Thomas) Bennett, who seemed about the right 'vintage" for the photo: Given Name(s): Patrick Thomas Last Name: BENNETT Birth Date: 1890, July 17 Gender: M Father: William Patrick BENNETT Mother: ...


6

I think the answer to your question may be that you will need to ask Queensland's Registrar-General in order to find out. The process is described on a Queensland Government page entitled Applying for a birth certificate which says that your husband will need to: Include proof of eligibility To determine that eligibility there is a PDF on the same ...


6

First, look at records in Australia. The Australian National Archives would be the first place to try and track down some record of your grandmother entering the country - they are likely to have made some inquiries at the time. There are two sets of records relating to two persons who arrived on the Orama in 1939. One is a young woman born 1920 (...


5

Note: this answer pertains to the question as it was originally asked, and not necessarily to its edited form. The question was how to find any surviving relatives of Phillip Post (who came from Eltville near Frankfurt around 1860) who might have served in WWII. The usual recommendation for studying your family history is to start with yourself and to work ...


5

The site Convict Records lists 389 different ships that made a total of 720 voyages to Australia carrying convicts. There are many, many possibilities for the ones on which your ancestor (is reputed to have) served. For example there were 20 voyages in 1836 and even 14 in 1843 when the flood of convicts was beginning to be reduced. While the The British ...


4

To gather more information about the operations of ships, establish their identity, just as you would for a person, and about the company which operated them. With ships, just like people, there can be more than one with the same name. You might search for the shipbuilder, the Master's name, the company who operated the ship, or the owner's name. All ...


4

They are the same person. I have a copy of William's baptism entry on 2 July 1815 in which his mother Elizabeth Watson names Bourn Russell as the father of her child. Also the Sussex Bastardry Papers in which they sought payment from BR for the upbringing of the child. Also William's Apprentice Indenture papers of 1828 and the 1829 crew list of the Lady ...


3

I found an immigrant list for the arrival of the Eaton Hall on 25 Jun 1877 in the South Australian Register and the Evening Journal of 26 Jun 1877, and also the South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail of 30 Jun 1877. However, James Day does not appear to be listed. All immigrants aboard the ship were single men. I also performed this search at the ...


3

There are two possible sets of records to search. Firstly, the National Archives of Australia holds online departure records from various ports. Although incomplete for the early 1900s, and not specifically for deportees, this may help start your search. In my experience, the responses to their Enquiry Form are very helpful in narrowing down your search. ...


3

There is a William Jacka in the Queensland, Australia, Passenger Lists, 1848-1912 of Ancestry.com who appears to be about the expected age for your William Jacka. Name: William Jacka Age: 21 Birth Year: abt 1852 Ship Name: Alexandrina Port of Departure: London, England Port of Arrival: Rockhampton Arrival Date: 7 Dec 1873 If you have not ...


3

I'm not too convinced that your ancestor, born in 1878, would appear in a directory in 1885. There's a history of Hindmarsh at www.sahistorians.org.au/175/bm.../a-heritage-history-of-hindmarsh.doc which indicates that Hindmarsh Model School was founded in 1878.


3

Since naturalization doesn't apply to your ancestors, voter's lists would be the most obvious citizenship-related record type that should contain those names. Ancestry has such a database, "Australia, Electoral Rolls, 1903-1980". The Wikipedia article "Australian nationality law" gives a lot of detail on the topic of Australian citizenship. A similar ...


3

Wikipedia's list of online newspapers for Australia does not include the Illawarra Mercury, but it does point to a free site called the Ryerson Index, which provides a free searchable index of death notices and obituaries from 1803 to present. Using the Ryerson Index, I was able to find the following: Surname Given Names Notice Type Date Event Age ...


3

I suspect that in 1890 H.M. may be Her Majesty's but C. might be Customs, Commissioner, Cutter or something else. The asker commented: I found Sands dir's in Ancestry. Found no list of abbr'ns there. I searched Trove newspapers for Henry Gill. Found other names in Sands with "HMC" and searched Trove for their names hoping to see what HMC means. ...


2

While not a direct answer to your question, I have a similar situation in Queensland. The family story is that my ancestor joined up, in the footsteps of his elder brother. A couple of weeks later he was found out and was escorted home by the Military Police. The story has it that no paperwork was shown to his mother at the time. I have obtained the ...


2

I have found the following information about the Ship Constance and also the Antelope. As I can see it this will tie in all your information and solve some of your problems. Shipping Gazette and Sydney General Trade List (NSW : 1844 - 1860), Monday 11 December 1854, page 243 : Heading Wonga Wonga & Telegraph. Vessels advertised at Boston on 24th ...


2

If the layout is similar to the City Directories I am familiar with from the New England region in the USA, your 'subheading' of Regent Street is an indication where Regent Street crosses Halifax Street. Unless there has been a massive re-naming and re-numbering, these cross-street indicators allow the reader to see whether there have been re-numberings and ...


2

Using a NameSearch at the National Archives of Australia there seem to be three World War I soldiers who might be named Les or Leo A. Williams: Williams, Arthur Leslie : SERN 22845 : POB Sydney NSW : POE Sydney NSW : NOK F Williams A who embarked from Sydney on 11 May 1916; was aged 23 years 2 months when he enlisted 11 Jan 1916 so born about Nov 1892; from ...


2

Very often the starting date for the databases we use online, or the original records that we view if we can go to the archives that hold them, come about because of a law mandating that the records should be kept. So if you get stuck, it can be useful to step back and ask what records were kept and which records survive. (See Determining what records are ...


2

There are a number of ways money might have been sent abroad. But in your case it would have probably have been via a company. Around the time that countries and empires had colonies in the Americas and Australia, companies such as Western Union started to emerge due to the increased need (or want) to send money back and forth to family members. These ...


2

I agree it is most likely to be 2376 Patrick Thomas Bennett: Perhaps the other soldier is 2952 Leslie Alick Williams of South Australia. Both were serving overseas in 1917 so doubt the date on their photos is relevant.


2

The Murray was a registration district from 1848 to 1856, being renamed Burra in that year. According to this discussion, "In 1848, The Murray was proclaimed as a Registration District with its Registry Office located in Kooringa, the centre of a growing mining area."


2

B103 forms are, as you say, used in strange ways that might not be expected from the printed columns. I can't read this example sufficiently well, but other B103s that I have seen have, in effect, two sets of dates. One set refers to the dates of events in the person's career. The other set refers to the date that the information was generated by the Army's ...


2

With some useful ideas thrown in by others I did some more research in the Sands and Macdougall Directories and Trove newspapers and noticed the timeline below: Adelaide Observer on 24 Nov 1883 - Lavinia R Sellar was appointed by the Education Department as head mistress of infant department, Hindmarsh 1884 Sands and Macdougall Directory (see question for ...


2

Given that the dates you are looking at postdate the opening of the Suez Canal (which opened in 1869) it's likely that they would have taken passage on a ship going from Australia to Europe via the canal. Most of the manifests I've looked at for ships following that route have a stop at Port Said at the northern end of the canal so that's where I'd be ...


2

The majority of Germans arriving in Australia post 1866 (her birth) settled in South Australia or Queensland. You would need to search shipping records ex Port Adelaide or Moreton Bay (Qld) rather than the Outwards passenger lists for Victoria or NSW as suggested, remembering it takes 10 hours to drive in todays cars from Adelaide to Melbourne so unlikely ...


1

Ancestry.com currently has 22 titles in their Passenger Lists collection for Australia. Of these, there are at least two that record passengers leaving Australian states (formerly colonies): Ancestry.com. New South Wales, Australia, Departing Crew and Passenger Lists, 1816-1825, 1898-1911 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, ...


1

It is likely to be Manchester. The press cutting indicates service in England. The 2nd Western General Hospital was set up in Manchester for wounded ANZACs, including those from Gallipoli. It was staffed primarily by Australian and New Zealand nurses. Evacuations to Manchester took place from the field hospitals in Egypt and Malta. There is some ...


1

I just looked a little harder, and I am not sure whether this is new since last time I looked (I think thoroughly) but on the Contact Us page of Rookwood Anglican & General Cemeteries there is a Search Online link at the top. Unfortunately, it is currently reporting: Sorry – this feature is currently not available. I have phoned the cemetery (02 ...


1

Unless you follow PolyGeo's good advice and strike lucky in Ancestry.com, and/ or Cecil Z Ede's will shows anything, you are going to have great difficulty proving your theory. In the Consular Births Abroad records, there are no Ede registrations in Japan in the right period. Unlike births in England, you did not have to register a birth with the British ...


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