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10

Both towns are listed in Gesher Galicia's All-Galicia Database. Gesher Galicia is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization that promotes and conducts Jewish genealogical and historical research for Galicia, a province of the former Austro-Hungarian Empire, which is today part of eastern Poland and southwestern Ukraine. Our major research initiative — The ...


7

There is no correct spelling of your surname. Sure, there is now. It's Wasmanski. Unless one of your modern-day relatives spell it differently, and they might. It is possible your current spelling is a change from another established spelling. It is possible the other spelling is a mistake (also be sure you're looking at the original document and not a ...


7

I read Andrievci, Kreis Brod in Slawonien heimatszuständig nach Klattau gl. Bez. in Böhmen The answer to your question lies in "heimatzuständig" or also only "zuständig" (responsible) in other records. The "Heimatrecht" (local citizenship) in a community was acquired either by being born there, marrying in or in later days also by living there for a ...


6

It is a wedding souvenir and it is in German Alois Kowatsch Josefa Kowatsch geb Gregortschitsch Vermählt 10. Januar 1898 zu Oestereich. that is: [groom] Alois Kowatsch [bride] Josefa Kowatsch, maiden name Gregortschitsch married 10. January 1898 in Austria The resources mentioned in Reading given name of German great-grandaunt? would have helped you ...


5

The problem of identifying the casualties falls into several sections: which military units and which individuals were there? what relevant records were created at the time of the battle? where were those records kept, where were they archived and where are they now? Which units took part and their commanders are included in most decriptions of the battle. ...


5

This is a stub of an answer which will be added to as I find more resources. I'll write out a Research Plan to give you some ideas. You may have done a lot of this already, and if you have, feel free to add to your question. But I'll start from scratch, so the information may also help someone coming along later. Since you asked specifically about Jewish ...


5

It means that you do not have a triangulation group. In this case, F236166 is a match to A951428 on chromosome 3 between 25M and 38M and close relations F392491 and F381005 match to A951428 on chromosome 3 between 30M and 42M, but F236166 does not match F392491 and F381005 on chromosome 3. Therefore F236166 is matching the DNA that came from one parent of ...


4

It is "Anton", as already transcribed in a previous answer. The extra flourishes in the A are almost vertical instead of horizontal.


4

The good news is that over 100,000 Jewish birth, marriage, and death records from Lviv (Lwow, Lemberg) have been transcribed and put online for free searching in Gesher Galicia's All Galicia Database: http://search.geshergalicia.org/ The bad news is that I don't see anyone there named "Mühlgay". Could your great-grandfather have had a different surname ...


4

Try http://www.jewishgen.org/AustriaCzech/ausguide.htm, easily findable via Google.


3

I don't think it reads "nauli". The two consecutive vowels look very similar, often the same, and sometimes more like an 'a' than a 'u'. Those letters often look very similar in handwritten documents. In addition, there is always a wavy line over the word in the linked example. This, according to the UK National Archives' guide to palaeography, generally ...


3

Unfortunately, "Schmidt" in all it's variants is a quite common name in Austria. How you wrote it it may be also be more common for a German person. Providing more detailed information about the person may help. Regarding the POW camp I believe you mean "Longbridge Camp, Hampton Lovett, Droitwich, Worcester". The National Archives holds some information ...


3

Place is probably Gorenje Lakovnice, Novo Mesto, Slovenia, "and belongs to the Parish of Novo Mesto–Šmihel". As in a previous answer, Fuzzy Gazetteer and GOV led to the above result. In the record images, "Gorn." is clearly an abbreviation; the full word seems to have a number of grammatical forms, depending on the following word.


3

You will find the birth records in the registers of the confessional institution since he was born before 1938 (the registration authorities started their work in 1938 in Austria afaik, see e.g. for Vienna here, but unfortunately German only: http://www.wien.gv.at/kultur/archiv/nutzung/forschung/personen.html) In case he was roman catholic, you can contact ...


3

Apparently this is supplementary ("a mention") to a 1916 church record: Gefirmt? 27 V. '928 A. fide? Defiat? 27. VII 1939 S.115/39 B.H.III. Zivilgetraut am 9.5.1940, 812/40 right column note: Fr. A. 6 Wien 3, 1 Ehe The image has 3 sets of different handwriting, apparently 3 events: Confirmation? in 1928 Probably the church marriage in 1939 (...


3

A few suggestions: Bartelmä Gregorzhizh wife: Luzia Perjatu Franz' birth month: 9ber (November) I don't have any better suggestion for the place name, perhaps someone with local knowledge can provide more insight on this. Likewise I hesitate to guess on the signed names at the bottom; however I do not think they read Joseph Luyarizh or Martin Barthol. In ...


3

Searching on JewishGen is not the same thing as asking questions on the (free) e-mail mailing lists of JewishGen. Researchers on the lists may know about sources that no one has bothered to transcribe and put online yet. (There are lots of sources like that…) I would definitely ask your question on the main JewishGen e-mail list, as well as the Hungary-...


3

I actually found a list of casualties of the Battle of Mollwitz in an archive, the Landeshauptarchiv Sachsen-Anhalt. As a part of a collection of military documents belonging to Leopold II, Prince of Anhalt-Dessau (“Verschiedene Militaria aus der Dienstzeit des Fürsten Leopold Maximilian im Königlich Preußischen Heer, 1733-1750”) it might be limited to ...


3

From what I have seen in baptism/marriage/death entries Jos. is a common abbreviation of Joseph. John (Johann, in Latin Joannes/Ioannes) would have been abbreviated as Joan., Joa. or Joh. See e.g. that entry, first line, last column: coop. Joa. Ant. Mogetini p. t. meaning interim chaplain John Anthony [Joannes Antonius] Mogetini.


3

Is there a column heading or is this in a page margin? Typically printed baptismal records had extra columns for confirmations, and for comments. I've also seen vaccination records, emigration notes, parish transfers, death dates, etc. in the comments fields. (Marriage and burial records can also include a number of interesting details in the comments column)...


2

I am sure, it is Maizen. g looks different than z, see other words containing g, such as "Durch bezirksobrigkeitliche Bewilligung" in the column "Urkunden" on the same page.


2

Yes, all these underlined writings refer to the surname "Jurglič". In these times the priests wrote what they heard and everyone heard it differently and so there are several different forms of names in the church books.


2

I am sure the last name is Kurent. I have looked for this name in My Heritage and have found out, that "Kurent" is a Slovenian or Croatian name. There I have found a lot of people with this name.


2

I used the GOV (which now include placenames from most of Europe) and searched for Trb*. 3 possible matches to Trbontle were among the results: Trbovlje, Slovenia (one of your finds, and probably best match), Trbonje, near Dravograd in Slovenia, and (less likely) Trbounje, in Croatia Trbonje has its own church, according to Wikipedia, but the ...


2

Given that Austro-Hungarian and German units coordinated on both the Eastern and later Italian Fronts you need to be sure that he actually served in the German Army. The Bavarians, while under overall command of the German High Command, maintained a "separate army as mentioned above and those records are searchable through Ancestors -- photocopies of the ...


2

The answer provided on Finding information on German soldiers from World War I and World War II? is helpful here too, as you don't necessarily need a unit for your research. If he was injured, went missing or became a POW, you will find him in the Verlustlisten (by name). If he truly served in the German army (where do you know this from?) while originating ...


2

The website to check is http://genteam.at, which has millions of records from Austria on its site. The problem is that European privacy laws prevent access to records as recent as 1931. However, there are people on the mailing list who may have access beyond what is available to you, and it might be worth asking a question on their mailing list.


2

In general you should ask native speakers of various languages, the names just sound right or they don't. This name sounds vaguely Polish-German, and there are various spellings possible - the names of your ancestors might have been mangled by someone. Nowy Tart might be Nowy Targ in today's southern Poland (former region Galicia of the Austrio-Hungarian ...


2

There seems to be a change from Obacha to Obaha. Could be a spelling change between languages (similar to zh to č); could be a pronunciation change over time, reflected in the spelling; could be due to different native language of the record-keepers (who recorded names as they heard them, using the spelling conventions they were familiar with).


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