11

Imprimis is Latin for "firstly". The word commonly appears in lists in parish registers and wills, preceding the first item.


10

The note reads: "According to the Cert[ifica]te of the Rev[eren]d G. Morland transmitted to me 30th August." An Act for the better regulating and preserving Parish and other Registers of Births, Baptisms, Marriages, and Burials in England (Stat. 52 Geo. 3, c. 146) describes the reason why this was written in the margin: IV. And be it further enacted, ...


10

You need first of all to make sure you've got data from all the parish churches and chapels in the area. https://www.familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Lancashire will help you with a list of all parishes and all the chapels in those parishes. Plus data about what's a/v from those places. By no means all registers will be online. Then you need to have a look at ...


9

I may be stating the obvious here, but as the etymology of this abbreviation is not covered in PolyGeo's answer: Xember and its associated abbreviations are using X, the Roman numeral 10, to represent the 10th month. Under the old style (Julian) calendar used in Britain and its colonies until 1752, the first month was March, making December the 10th month. ...


8

This is Fraktur script, used in Germanic countries. The text above says Forældrenes Navn, Stand, Haandtering og Bopæl which translates to Parents' Name, Condition, Occupation and Residence If you should happen upon some Danish handwriting that you need to be able to read, FamilySearch has a Wiki page on Scandinavian Handwriting that also has links to ...


8

First, a note on how to read this page. This documents the baptism and "reception into the church" of multiple people, one per line. Only the first date of each month is fully spelled out, and all other dates in the month are just given by the day number of the month. The excerpt given starts with 7 August 1852. The next line is 8 August 1852, the ...


7

A baptismal witness may have emigrated from the same region as your ancestor. I was unable to locate the point of origin for my German ancestor, but the baptismal witness for one of his children traveled on the same ship and his origin was known. This helped me connect to previously unknown ancestors in Germany.


7

An archaic meaning of spurious was illegitimate. See: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/spurious


7

To be more confident that "Xemb. means December" (which I suspect it probably does) you could look at slightly earlier entries in the same set of records for abbreviations like VIIemb., VIIIob./VIIIemb. and IXemb. (for September, October and November). I found a Princeton University Abbreviations of the Names of the Months page that lists abbreviations for ...


7

I think that the "X" is actually just a poorly formed "F". I looked at the Rocque Map for that part of Bermondsey. Although the map is a little earlier (it's dated 1746), it gives a pretty good idea of how the area would have looked when your ancestors were living there. Snows Field and Crucifix Lane both intersect with Barnaby Street (now just part of ...


7

As a fellow rookie, one trick the others haven't mentioned, is to search the marriage registers in the parishes of Thorganby, Nether Poppleton, Fulford and Stillingfleet in the years 1740-1780 for marriages and marriage witnesses in the names of Hare and Fowler. That's the best way to build up a reliable FAN network - unless your man was a church warden - ...


6

A useful guiding principle is that you should record everything that might be useful to you later (even if you are not sure at the moment how you will use it). You may have heard of the approach called FAN Club genealogy that emphasises research on Friends, Associates and Neighbours of your target family as a way around apparent blockages. Witnesses ...


6

Witnesses should be recorded for every event, baptisms and marriage events included. First, these witnesses are important people in the life of the person in question. Second, the witnesses' lives intertwine in at least this one way and possibly more. Third, research into the witnesses' lives may enable you to find out more about your person. It's too bad ...


6

The "y" is actually a thorn, so the text seems to read: July the 24th a girl that liveth with Stephen Dudderidge called Elizabeth. It is an unusual form of words though.


6

There have been a number of attempts to estimate these values, knowing that it is very challenging to count things that didn't happen. A good summary of available statistics is given in The Population History of England, 1541-1871 by E. A. Wrigley and R. S. Schofield (2010). There are chapters and chapters of statistics and commentary on this subject, so I'...


6

I would first caution: In searching for his baptism record, you could be searching for something which simply has never existed. Baptism was neither a legal nor cultural imperative in the 1860s in England. He might just not have been baptised. Many children were not baptised at birth, or even in the first year of life. Some were not baptised until their ...


6

A Guide to Using the Records of Civil Registration from the Society of Genealogists says: The records of civil registration in England & Wales, which commenced on 1 July 1837, relate to the birth, marriage and death of an individual. ... In England & Wales, up to that time, the government had relied very much on the church to register ...


6

Per proc. (per procurationem) refers to the presence of proxy sponsors (godparents) standing in for those named. From the introduction of the Rituale Romanum (1614) and possibly earlier, the Catholic Church allowed sponsors (godparents) to be represented at a baptism by a proxy (per procurationem) if they were unable to be present but could otherwise carry ...


5

Using the catalog reference for Alfred and Emily's marriage as a clue, I moved to the next image on Ancestry and looked at the top right corner of the following page: I started from the catalog entry for Alfred and Emily's marriage, which was WO 69/554/30, looked below at the grey box marked Context of this record, and chose the link to Browse by Reference....


5

An avenue to explore would be property transactions, especially if you believe they may be a family of means. For some reason (!) the English state has always paid particular attention to creating and retaining records about property. (A short version of this says: Follow the money -- the records of baptisms marriages and burials at this time were in the ...


5

It's always worth double-checking to see whether the online image comes from the original register or the Bishop's Transcripts. I've certainly sometimes found that the transcriptions on sites like FindMyPast don't always quite match the images available on the site. Sometimes this is just an error in transcription, but on other occasions it has been ...


5

In my experience, there is no prescribed way to determine whether a search for non-conformist records will be fruitful. You can look at given names in the family. For example, certain biblical names were popular among various Christian denominations, or acquired middle names might indicate Catholic. Many other records do sometimes specify information about ...


5

First, did he marry? If so, check his marriage certificate. Was the ceremony carried out as CofE, non-conformist, RC, etc...? That might tell you what registers you're going to need to check. Next, find a copy of the Philimore Atlas and Index of Parish Registers - it may be available in your local library, or, if you have a subscription, you can check some ...


5

It is Catherine Dignan or possibly its variant Degnan. The same surname is in the next line written more clearly for Bridget Dignan. There is a 1b written at the end of the name which you have to ignore to see the name clearly. Edit: As AndyW points out in the comments, it is probably 2'6 written at the end of the line, not 1b.


4

The FamilySearch Research Wiki's French Wordlist has this entry: baptisé sous condition = conditionally baptized Could this be the phrase you are seeing? Conditional baptisms are performed where there is some question about whether the previous baptism was done in a proper fashion. Wikipedia has a brief article on conditional baptism, which says (...


4

In the 1851 Census there is a William Rouse aged 18 living with his brother-in-law's family. William Hobbs Elizabeth Hobbs (Nee Rouse) Elizabeth Jane Hobbs Kitty Rouse (Mother in law) William Rouse (brother in Law) This would make him Elizabeth's brother. William Crossman had a younger sister Elizabeth who married William Hobbs. Kitty Rouse is the ...


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