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9

You'll need to visit the Einwohnermeldeamt (registration office), which is usually a part of the Stadtverwaltung (city administration), in Bad Tölz, ideally in person. As long as you can prove that your mother was indeed your mother (copies of your own and your mother's birth certificates and ideally your grandmother's death certificate along with your ID ...


6

Technique Generally when you cannot find information on very small or insignificant placenames, you research nearby larger places (because events may apply to a larger area) or the next placename in the hierarchy. You may even get lucky and find passing references to your main interest that weren't directly searchable. Scope Angloh (var. Angerloh) is ...


5

Your best place to start would be Steve Morse's Dachau record search, and see if you can find your Great Uncle. Morse's Dachau intro page gives a good overview of the extent of Dachau records available. Also see Dachau Concentration Camp Records on JewishGen which provides additional information about the records available.


4

The good news is that over 100,000 Jewish birth, marriage, and death records from Lviv (Lwow, Lemberg) have been transcribed and put online for free searching in Gesher Galicia's All Galicia Database: http://search.geshergalicia.org/ The bad news is that I don't see anyone there named "Mühlgay". Could your great-grandfather have had a different surname ...


4

Camp records are free on Fold3. You need to sign up to view scans, but it's definitely worth a try. I found a Buchenwald card of a remote uncle there myself.


4

The German Red Cross still maintains a WWII tracing service that would seem to apply to your case (my translation): You're looking for relatives in relation to the second world war? For over 65 years, the DRK tracing service has been conducting investigations concerning POWs and civil prisoners, missing Wehrmacht soldiers, civilians abducted and ...


3

Church & Hospital Wikipedia lists the church as being built in 1927-1929. The page about the hospital says that from 1945-1954 the hospital was seized by the US army. Since the church has always been a hospital church I find it unlikely that it was used for regular weddings but it is not impossible. It could have been used for US ones, but I also find ...


3

bgwiehle provided a great answer that might help with research for other small places as well. Some additions to Angloh. GOV (an gazetteer) lists Angloh as an “Einöd”. This means by definition just one or two residential houses, see e.g. German Wikipedia. Such places were (and are) common especially in southern Germany. Sometimes they vanished with the ...


3

The Matrikel was a series of laws that governed Jewish settlement in some German southern provinces; marriage was restricted and required proof of financial stability. Most historians also think these laws were meant to ensure that the number of Jews in the population of villages did not increase. It was also a quota of sorts. Certainly, the dowry or a pre-...


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