16

The name is Agnes. You can compare each of the letters to those shown in this BYU Script Tutorial for German handwriting. I extracted the relevant letters from the alphabet image on that site, and put them together in one image. I've included your image below for easy comparison.


14

Given the overlapping impact of the Factory Act of 1833 and the Elementary Education Act 1876, it is possible that the certificate would serve both purposes. It would show that he could be employed (because he was over 8) and that he was to continue to receive (part-time) education (since he was under 14). The following comes from The Registrar General's ...


14

I am not sure how much I can contribute from my perspective of (mostly) English-based research, but these thoughts might (or might not) help you to think more clearly. Precision: In English genealogy of the same period, it would be highly unusual to get 15 children all with an exact birth date. But that's because most of our records are based on parish ...


12

Treat yourself as you would treat anyone else in your database. Just realize that different databases allow/require you to handle persons in subtly different ways. At a purely research process level, you need to record two items of evidence (your Mom's statement and your birth certificate). At the conclusion level you need to add a conclusion level person ...


12

It looks like "instant" meaning "this month". Since the latest month mentioned in the left column is October, I would interpret it that the child John was born October 1st and baptized on October 24th. "Instant" (often abbreviated "inst.") and "ultimo" (or "ult."), meaning the previous month, are old English words originally from Latin. The previous ...


12

Very simply, an illegitimate child whose father did not consent to being included on the certificate (from 1875, if the child was illegitimate the father had to be present at the birth registration to be named; before that the mother could name a father but it wasn't verified), or an illegitimate child whose father was 'unknown' would not have a father's ...


11

The recent book "Tracing Your Naval Ancestors", by Simon Fowler (Pen & Sword, 2011) lists on p46-48 various biographical texts about RN officers, many of which are on-line at www.archive.org and Ancestry. It may be that some of these could provide a clue. Ancestry, e.g. has a database "Commissioned Sea Officers of the Royal Navy, 1660-1815" imaged from ...


11

I can't read the script yet. But we can say what it meant - if you look at the vertical annotation to the right, it explains that the registrations were cancelled because the qualification of the informant was not stated. Births and deaths in the English / Welsh registration system, and apparently the Irish I see from the image here, can only be reported by ...


10

Regarding your specific questions: 1) Can you be reasonable confident that this census record relates to your ancestors? Answer: The father and son's names match; the address is likely. Can you find any other corroborating evidence, for example, something that would establish that there was a daughter named Annie Augusta Holmes? 2) Can Annie was a ...


10

Yes, it is fair to infer that Mary and Sarah were twins. The indexes were compiled quarterly, meaning that children born over nine months apart should appear in different quarters. If one was registered late then they often are entered in the index in the correct quarter as well, with a reference in the margin such as "see Dec '37". The fact that both of ...


9

In order to build the case that these are one and the same person, you need to build a chain of links. Something like the following might suffice. Show that young William remained in Australia after the voyage. Demonstrate that he did something that brought him to public notice (perhaps he ran for parliament). Obtain a document that shows that William ...


9

Here are the questions that I would investigate, that might help determine who this extra household member was: Have you looked at the census page image to verify it was indexed correctly? This is the most frequent issue. Are there any notes in the margin beside this entry, that point to another page or another family? Indexers almost always ignore these, ...


8

The question was for unnamed children, but the answer (the way I read it) makes the assumption that that these are stillborn children. It is only a "modern" practice to give names immediately at birth. I have aunts and uncles that went unnamed for weeks. From family letters written by my grandmother to my grandfather, he was working 20 miles from home, so ...


8

This question is actually quite interesting for making us think. After all, if you can't get this one sorted, what can you? So... I'd record a source for your mother telling you, and a source for your birth certificate. Just make it clear what those sources are so anyone can read them and understand what they are; You say you've analysed the two because the ...


8

There are online databases, where you can find records of certain cities. They are called "Ortsfamilienbuecher", which means something like "Family records of a city" [1]. These records are mostly digitalized records from the church. Most of them start at about 1900 and might go back to the 16th century, which of course depends on the church records and the ...


8

Coverage of the birth registrations on FreeBMD is given in "Coverage Charts - Births" - these look complete for the years around 1884. However, I am unclear how well the data in Ancestry reflects that on the FreeBMD site. It is possible that the Ancestry data is an older version and not as complete. You probably appreciate perfectly well that the FreeBMD ...


8

Your father's birth certificate accurately reflects the information provided to the authorities at the time of his birth. That's all it can do: a birth certificate is not proof of biological parentage but a legal document. For any birth certificate, we have to consider how accurate the information was given a number of factors: legal requirements (in ...


7

Would you accept the information as being reliable if I went through and made some of the information less precise to match your preconceptions of how it ought to be? It does NOT make sense to reject the information simply because of its level of precision. On the other hand, there are other reasons to be cautious in how you use it. If you adopt a ...


7

Great answers posted already. Chris asks, "Does it make sense to ignore possible family information because it far too precise for its age?" Usually it does not make sense to ignore information because it is precise. I usually use the term "detailed"; have entered many sources as below (emphasis added): Joe Somebody, "WhosYaDaddyFamilyGroup," n.d., ...


7

The first thing to do would be to try to find your father (and his then family) in the 1940 Census (possible here at Family Search or several other information providers). If his surname is very distinctive, you may not have too many candidates in NYC to consider. If you are very fortunate and the daughter's birth was before, or in, 1939 that might be ...


7

When you see a date reference in the form Q4 1968, you are looking at what is referred to as a quarter date. Birth Registrations In the United Kingdom, once births are registered, a summary of the information is collected and published in a quarterly index. You can use the index reference to order a certificate for England and Wales via gov.uk -- the ...


7

Great explanation from @AdrianB38! It appears to me that the script reads, "Tabulate."


7

My first step was to look for the births of children registered with the surname Harris and the mother's maiden name of Earley from 1911 onwards, using the GRO indices. I found 4: Cyril Alexander Harris 1913M quarter Cardiff Austin Harris 1914S quarter Cardiff Esme Harris 1916D quarter Llanelly Jeanie Harris 1918S quarter Llanelly (The GRO indices with ...


7

I've left in my wrong turns below on purpose, to show the process of genealogical research and how to build evidence. This manifest is both correct and a red herring. It led me to some hypotheses that didn't pan out. To read about the path that led to the answer, go down an entire section, to "I'm getting nowhere fast." The full page is on FamilySearch (...


7

First, investigate the birth registrations (using the GRO website -- free but you do have to register) for Margaret Amy Williams and Margaret Ann Williams in the June and September quarters in 1899 (both quarters because she was born so close to the June quarter end) and compare the maiden names of the mother with the maiden names of Frederick Williams to ...


7

There would be no requirement to produce a birth certificate to get married (and still isn't -although you do now need to produce some proof of identity- most use a passport). Likewise there is no need to have a birth certificate to vote now, so unlikely to have been necessary at any time. The rate of non-registration of births was quite low by the time ...


6

If your father lived in New York, there may be limits on how much information you have access to because of privacy restrictions. I think this is a case where you will be much better off hiring a professional to help you, especially since you live outside of the USA. There are several questions on this site about doing research in New York, and some on ...


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