7

I've left in my wrong turns below on purpose, to show the process of genealogical research and how to build evidence. This manifest is both correct and a red herring. It led me to some hypotheses that didn't pan out. To read about the path that led to the answer, go down an entire section, to "I'm getting nowhere fast." The full page is on FamilySearch (...


6

Since you are accessing the database Texas Birth Index, 1903-1997 on Ancestry.com, look the database up in the Card Catalog. Under the section About Texas Birth Index, 1903-1997 there is a description of the database, which includes the county codes. County 57 is Dallas County. FamilySearch has a collection Texas, Birth Index, 1903-1997 which is described ...


6

An address would only be shown in column 5 (mother's name) when the mother's usual address at the time of the birth is different to that shown as the place of birth. So you would read that she was working as a servant at 10 St James Parade and probably only went to the workhouse infirmary to give birth (being the only medical provision available to her at ...


6

A good place to start researching workhouses is workhouses.org.uk. They have a page about Bristol Workhouse. Bristol actually maintained two workhouses: The Clifton Union workhouse at 100 Fishponds Road, Eastville Stapleton Workhouse The records of the Clifton Union Workhouse are held by Bristol Archives. Unfortunately, the details on your certificate ...


6

To expand on @JanMurphy's first method, there's a set of rules that genealogists use when they get stuck: If you can't go backwards, go forwards If you can't go forwards, go sideways If you can't go sideways, go to the pub You've been unable to work back from Norah's later life, so try another approach. Start with something you do know. You have a ...


5

This is a good example of how we have all created brick walls for ourselves. We blindly accept the information on records -- we match names and call it a day -- and then when we can't find things that match up, we get stuck. One of our community members has dubbed this premature connectivitis syndrome (PCS). Here are some methodologies you can employ to ...


5

I think it may be the town of Yelisavetgrad (also spelled Yelisavetgrod), now the city of Kropyvnytskyi in central Ukraine. If you are able to read Polish, the entry for Elizabetgrod in the Glossary of the Kingdom of Poland and other Slavic countries may provide some useful background. (Pages are shown as TIFF images, but with an OCR program, a little (or, ...


5

Since the information you have so far is not helping, it might be better to try an indirect approach. Here are some things to try. Make a list of all the source material you have about your grandmother's life, and then go through the documents systematically. Make a list of events and put them in order on a timeline. If your grandmother has siblings, do ...


5

I found a source for these using Google to search "texas county code numbers". They seem to come from the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts and 057 matches Dallas county there. The codes there match those from the Texas Department of State Health Services which makes them available as an Excel spreadsheet for download and says: The county FIPS (...


4

Does that mean that the ancestor was born at the meetinghouse? The short answer is, the person's birth date appears in the monthly meeting records. It could be as part of a family group record when the family joined that monthly meeting, and the birth may not have been in the geographical area of the meeting or even in Ohio. If the family has moved from ...


4

Like published histories and Ancestry Public trees, DAR/SAR databases are compiled sources. They may be useful as guides, but the question I always have is what primary sources did the compilers draw from when that entry was created? If you have not already done so, I recommend that you write out a biographical sketch and timeline for Vestus and his family, ...


4

Without more information, it is very hard to provide specific help. Anyway, it's not entirely clear why you "need" to find him. Is he a dead end in a tree you are researching? But given the limited information you have provided, here are some suggestions on how to proceed. You must have the date of birth and death from somewhere. If it is an obituary or ...


4

You can look up a place, given a place handle: place = db.get_place_from_handle(place_handle) print(place.name.value)


4

You already have an answer to this question that I believe is correct. I don't think I'll tell you anything you don't already know but I'll wax on a bit more about my usual sub-conscious process for deciphering a difficult word. What does it look like it says? I would likely transcribe this birthplace as "Vender". Depending on the consistency of the writer,...


4

As someone who lives a few miles from Coleraine, to me the town of Coleraine is where he was born. Simple as that. The 1831 census of Coleraine parish has 7 Stewart families in the town a mix of Presbyterian and Church of Ireland. Heads of household were Fanny, James, Alexander, Susan, Joseph, Andrew & John. The Church of Ireland parish records start in ...


3

The brickworks and kiln were located just south of Motcombe Park, as shown on this 1890 OS map: See the National Library of Scotland website to view this and other historic maps.


3

Additional tidbits: "Zaniewicze" (in slightly dated Polish, but still used) could mean "a place belonging to Zaniewski" or "place where Zaniewski family lives". And indeed, it's well documented as a - historically - a family "zaścianek", or a small private village, populated by gentry, but not much richer than peasants. There's a lot of documentation and ...


3

In a different context, one of our community members cautioned against premature connectivitis syndrome (PCS) when connecting up people, and I think the advice to "think INCHWORM (rather than leapfrog)" is equally valuable here, when you are thinking about a place name. Your question suggests you already know that civil parishes and Catholic ...


3

I think it simply says 'British', indicating his nationality. Note that in 1851, Ireland was still part of the United Kingdom. Added in response to the comments: It certainly was not necessary for the nationality to be included, but it is not clear whether this was added by the enumerator or the householder when he filled in the household schedule. The ...


3

If he was a mariner, as stated in the parish register, then I'd check to muster books for the port of Liverpool. Now, most don't have names for crew members (they're not nearly as useful as the crew lists after 1835), but some do and that might help you trace his origins (although I've yet to see one with place of birth, I'm told they do exist!). The bad ...


3

The first thing to check is the marriage certificate for Catherine and John James Cowin (From FreeBMD: Q3 (Sept) 1903; Chester; Vol 8a; Page 843). The marriage record should give you the name of Catherine's father, it may give you her age (sometimes it will just show "full"), and it will show her address at the time of the marriage. (Make a note of the ...


3

OK, this is too long for a comment, but isn't yet an answer. More documenting a search. The Father-in-Law, Julien Paudois, actually lived (and died) in Lacordaire, Saskatchewan. His grave is on Find a Grave, and his probate records are in the Saskatchewan Probate Estate Files, 1887-1931 collection of Familysearch. (His middle-name was Pierre.) This ...


2

The FamilySearch Research Wiki article France Gazetteers refers the reader to an online gazetteer at France Gen Web. The FamilySearch Research Wiki article also lists several references that are at the Family History Library, many of which have not been microfilmed yet. You can try searching for other libraries closer to your current location by looking ...


2

Based on sempaiscuba's answer, Julien PAUDOIS is most likely: Julien Joseph Emile PAUDOIS, born in Saint-Mars-la-Jaille (probably what was later turned into "Saint Lagille", as it sounds similar) on the 6th of May 1875, son of Julien PAUDOIS and Joséphine BOSSÉ. See https://www.archinoe.fr/v2/ark:/42067/c7024a4c2466721865b2b84824e58edc


2

Before I address the place name issue, I'd like to repeat the wise advice given elsewhere on the site in this answer to the question Tracing US ancestor back to Germany: At one time or another, I suppose most of us have suffered from premature connectivitis syndrome (PCS)--we don't really know enough yet by which we can well identify a person, yet we want ...


1

In your original post you asked whether Coleraine might mean the civil parish or the RC parish. Presbyterians in Ireland didn’t use the parish system for their churches, so it wouldn’t be normal for them to mean a parish, and they especially wouldn’t be referring to an RC parish. As I said before, to me Coleraine just means the town. There’s mention of the ...


1

I would report both of them. I have a friend who has birthdates in his tree of "16-Mar-1623, Braintree, Massachusetts, United States of America". Of course, there was no USA in 1623 :-) However, there are times where the original name is good for searching old records, and the current name is useful for actually finding the place. Constantinople vs. ...


1

Since you know that your father came from NovoSibirsk, which appears to be "the third-most populous city in Russia (after Moscow and St. Petersburg)", it seems likely that it would have people there interested in the family history of its current and former residents. When I searched on "Novosibirsk family history" I found that there is a Novosibirsk Russia ...


1

A good place to start when looking for people from Russia and adjacent countries is Jewish Gen. This link will take you directly to pages on Lithuania. http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/#Lithuania


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