26

Note the time of year of the death and the time of year of the burial. In New England, I've seen several obituaries from winter deaths that say someone will be buried later in the spring. In the post The Frozen Chosen: Winter Grave Digging Meets Modern Times, Traci Rylands says: Before the invention of the backhoe, there was only one way to dig a grave and ...


11

As others already mentioned the body can be held by the coroner in case of a suspicious death. If the body needs to be moved to another state/nation for burial the paperwork/permits to do so, can also take a long time to come through. And that even without taking into account things like war, political unrest, sanctions in or against one of the nations ...


10

The death may have been suspicious. Bodies can only be buried or cremated once released by the coroner. In the vast majority of cases this is automatic and rapid. However, if there is any reason to retain the body in case tests need to be performed to establish a cause of death or to incriminate a possible murderer then the body will not be released. If, ...


9

It would have been very uncommon, if it ever happened, in the 1600s. And if it did happen, I imagine it would have only have been for a person of significant wealth or importance. The journey across the Atlantic took many weeks if not months. Most people would not want a body around for that period of time, when there were not many ways to keep a body well ...


8

To answer the question about baptising sickly children - yes, absolutely. The Church of England has an abbreviated form of the Order (i.e service) of Baptism to be used in homes etc. in such circumstances. Such baptisms are generally known as Private baptisms and may be marked with a letter P in the register. Remember that there were once those who were ...


6

I know someone who lost a family member to a fairly uncommon disease. With the permission of the family, the body was retained by the hospital for further examination to try to learn as much as possible about the effects of said disease. This was for a fairly significant length of time, I think it was close to a year before the burial eventually took place. ...


5

Shipping the body back to the home village is a possibility, as you can see in the related question What records might be created in England when people are re-interred?. In his book talk The Forgotten Irish: Irish Emigrant Experiences in America, author Damian Shiels talked about Civil War Veterans being shipped home to Ireland from the United States. (...


5

"Would a vicar enter a burial if no burial took place?" Possibly. I have seen (and started) more than one thread about exactly what the meaning of an entry in a burial register is. The "obvious" answer is - it means a burial, so a funeral with burial elsewhere would not be entered. However, it was clear that examples do exist of funerals at that church ...


4

My initial suggestion would be that this is a "public" grave, i.e. one to which the right of burial was not owned by an individual but by the council. Having said that, if you see nothing between 1871 and 1917, this seems an unlikely explanation as I would have thought a public grave would have been used for subsequent burials soon after the 1871 burial. ...


4

I'm unsure for which country you are asking but from the absence of it I assume the US. ;-) One more ordinary explanation could be that the paperwork took rather long. Even in cases where the death was not suspicious or discovered late it could be that there were no next of kin that were immediately known. Somebody has to go through all the legal and burial ...


4

This does read like a gravestone epitaph, especially the line from the hymn "Come unto Me and rest". There are a few resources for the Isle of Wight that would be my first ports of call. The Isle of Wight FHS website contains two databases that are potentially useful in your case: Monumental Inscriptions Index: The coverage page says that inscriptions for ...


3

Unfortunately, my wife's grandmother died within the past month of simple old age. She has been cremated. Because of Covid, the date when her ashes will be interred has not yet been determined and will likely remain so for many months. The entire family wants to meet in person for that event, and she will simply sit on a shelf as ashes until we are able ...


3

One unfortunate possibility is that the register entries made in 1917 are erroneous. Your comment on another answer that most burials at that time were happening in a different part of the cemetery could mean that the two infants in question were also buried somewhere else and that an incorrect plot number was entered into the records. There is a very real ...


3

The Cheshunt Cemetery description at Find-a-grave states that "The cemetery contains around 15,200 graves with 26,000 interments. The cemetery is maintained by Broxbourne Services, the Council's in-house contractor, ..." Clearly, many graves have multiple interments. It should be possible to query Broxbourne Services on the cemetery's definition of a ...


3

I can't see an obvious burial record for Edward, but if you can find out where his wife was buried, there's a decent chance he'll be there too. Or he could be in a family plot somewhere, so you could look for his father and mother too. Edward's probate record on Ancestry says "of Sileby near Loughborough" which matches the 1901 census. The residence ...


2

The Index To Death Duty Registers 1796-1903 at FindMyPast gives the residence of Edward Brewer Brooks at the time of his death on 11 May 1901 as being Loughborough. You may already know this but, if not, it may provide you with another search term.


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