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When we can't find a person in a collection of historical records, or don't have enough information to know if it is our ancestor or not, it helps to widen the search -- and the same is true for finding material that will give you historical context about your question. If you haven't done so already, write out a short biographical sketch of your ancestor ...


5

I located the obituary for your great grandfather in the The San Francisco Call, dated 18 November 1908. This obituary mentions a different lodge: As you can see, in addition to some wonderful genealogical 'gold dust', this obituary mentions Germania lodge No. 1718 K. of H. (Knights of Honor). It is, of course, possible that Adam was a member of more than ...


5

Jan Murphy's answer focused on resources. Mine is more about questions that may spark research paths. They may not all be answerable: Return to Europe, first "sent away by train" - How far did they go on the train and to which port? Could they have gone all the way to the east coast before embarking to Europe? How much would the voyage have cost? Was she ...


4

In many respects, your question is like one already posted here, How can I determine what records are available in a particular locale? The same principles apply for discovering records for a particular time or topic. My checklist for finding new record groups looks like this: Learn what records might have been created in a particular time and place. ...


4

Before every election in the US, there is a cutoff date by which one has to be registered to vote -- if you miss the cutoff, you can't vote in that area. People who are already registered to vote in California and move to another area may be able to vote provisionally -- I would have to look up the rules. But every step of the process has a similar cutoff ...


3

Regarding whether or not the name should have been allowed to be seen, the federal government limits census records going back for 72 years. For example, my husband, who was born in 1937, is shown on the last publicly-released census of 1940. That census was released in 2012. The next census to be released will be the 1950 census in 2022. My point is ...


3

Looks like it's the "Knights of the Royal Arch". See this 1901 article from San Francisco about them, where they are described as "an organization of men engaged in the liquor traffic". https://cdnc.ucr.edu/cgi-bin/cdnc?a=d&d=SFC19011031.2.92 (Note that doesn't explicitly mention lodge number 2.)


3

You left out the relevant information, so you may have already tried these techniques: Have you used a variety of search settings - name spellings and variations, date ranges, places? Have you used more than one set of indexes and search forms (ancestry, familysearch; others include myheritage, mocavo)? Have you found hunted through the enumeration district(...


3

There is a related question How to find out which Freemasons' lodge grandfather belonged to? which has some general resources. You are likely to receive the same kind of information that is found on the Massachusetts, Mason Membership Cards, 1733-1990 database on Ancestry.com: These cards contain last residence information, birth date and location, ...


3

Most churches will follow vital record laws, you will need the persons death record or their birth record along with their permission to obtain the baptism record. After you have that, then you can just start calling churches. There is no online database mostly because institutions are not allowed to give out birth records of people who are alive or born in ...


2

Who Holds The Records? Some records from California State Hospitals can be accessed online. Ancestry's database California, State Hospital Records, 1856-1923 have records from the California State Archives consisting of these record sets: Stockton Hospital Commitment Registers, 1856–1934. MF8:10. 34 volumes. Dept. of Mental Hygiene—Hospitals. ...


2

It would probably be useful to read about California probate law and the duties of an executor (PolyGeo's link to Wills, Estates, and Probate page of the California Courts is a good place to start). In most jurisdictions, there is a requirement to show that a reasonable search has been done to find and contact all the heirs. There are also likely to be ...


2

Current California Legislative Information on elections includes this provision: "ARTICLE 5. Voter Registration Index [2180 - 2194.1] ( Article 5 enacted by Stats. 1994, Ch. 920, Sec. 2. ) "2180. "(a) At least once, and more often if he or she deems it necessary, within each two-year period commencing on the first day of January in each odd-numbered year, ...


2

This may be a reference to Royal Arch Masonry. See (via Google Books) Proceedings of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of the State of California at Its ... Annual Convocation, Volumes 37-39 (1891), where the San Francisco Chapter is listed as No 1 (Sonoma is Chapter 2). There are no members named "Farnlacher" in this specific volume. Other volumes ...


2

The FamilySearch wiki page for Stanislaus County, California genealogy lists the following sources for marriage records: 1800 - 2007 - California, United States Marriages at FindMyPast — index $ 1850 - 1945 - California Marriages, 1850-1945 at FamilySearch — index 1850 - 1952 - California, County Marriages, 1850-1952 at FamilySearch — index and images 1854 -...


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A cursory search of the webpages for Modesto and Stanislaus County brought me to the County Clerk-Recorder, where you can order copies of vital records. It doesn't give an e-mail addres, but a phone number is listed and this could be first step to confirm that they do in fact have your parent's marriage certificate. I can't say for sure about the US or ...


1

This may be tough because you may run up against privacy restrictions, but here are some things that I would try. Start with a timeline, a plan, a source checklist, and a research log This may sound stupid, but start by making a list of all the documents you have. Take all the information you have and put it in a timeline, in chronological order -- and make ...


1

As you can see in this blog post entitled Finding Court Records in San Diego County, California, the process for finding out whether you were included in a Will appears likely to be difficult and/or expensive. The only advice, and this is definitely not legal advice, that I can offer, is to visit the Wills, Estates, and Probate page of the California Courts ...


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