37

The simple answer is: they didn't. If they weren't literate (do you have any evidence they were?), then for the census they would have given their details verbally to somebody else to write down (e.g. census enumerator, or a neighbour) who wrote down what they thought they heard. And if the family concerned were illiterate, they wouldn't spot a mismatch. ...


20

I note that Charles Thomas Gigg was baptised on 13 Feb 1887 at St James Norlands, Kensington. His mother is given as Hannah Sarah Gigg, of 5 Mary's Place, single: Source: Ancestry.co.uk, London, England, Church of England Births and Baptisms, 1813-1906 Whenever I have a case of a mother and illegitimate child vanishing without trace, my first thought is ...


16

According to www.1911census.org.uk, the information recorded for individuals included: Infirmity, one of deaf, dumb, blind, lunatic, imbecile or feeble minded. The age at which the "infirmity came on" was also required. I've cropped out a section from one page of the 1911 census for Herrison Hospital to illustrate this: All of the "codes" in the ...


11

I have a similar case in the 1930 Census. I have city directory listings showing where my focus family might be, but I cannot find a 1930 Census record. Ancestry.com suggests a match to me where the parents in the household have similar names and ages as my focus family. In my case, the hinted-at family lives on the other side of the state from where I ...


10

You've got several theories to test: Charles Graham is brother-in-law of Charles Cripps AND son of Anna AND full-brother of Catherine, or Charles Graham is brother-in-law of Charles Cripps AND son of Anna BUT half-brother of Catherine (and Johanna), or Charles Graham is brother-in-law of Charles Cripps BUT NOT son of Anna and NOT brother or half-brother of ...


10

Annoying...! I think the word is "Indep", meaning "Independent", as in "Of Independent means". "I" and "J" do seem to be very similar in many hands and I'm not sure what to say the difference is. I've just looked through this census book and can't see any other use of a capital "I", and of course found several "J" for "Jane", etc., that look very similar. ...


9

To answer this question, it helps to understand some Canadian history, especially basic facts about Canada's creation. A good overview can be found in Yvonne Sorensen's webinar Using Canadian Census Records, which was presented by FamilySearch's US/Canada team on 28 May 2015. A timeline: 1763 -- the area known as New France was turned over to Great ...


9

Questions of this kind are a sign that the researcher needs to consider making the transition from person-based to source-based genealogy. In a post dated Tuesday, March 22, 2011 titled The Chasm, the blogger The Ancestry Insider talked about different stages of doing genealogy research. He says: There are three time frames or stages of ancestral ...


9

The information on the census forms that you can see online is only as good as the knowledge (and truthfullness) of the person providing the information to the enumerator. So, depending on who told the enumerator about Mary Williams: They may not have known so guessed They lied They did not remember correctly In addition the forms you see are not the forms ...


9

Here are the questions that I would investigate, that might help determine who this extra household member was: Have you looked at the census page image to verify it was indexed correctly? This is the most frequent issue. Are there any notes in the margin beside this entry, that point to another page or another family? Indexers almost always ignore these, ...


9

The UK and Ireland censuses are available from multiple places: Ancestry, FindMyPast, and MyHeritage to name a few. FamilySearch has transcripts, but it links to FindMyPast for the images. I can access the image at Ancestry and MyHeritage through my library. In both of these, the image is not very clear. However, on MyHeritage, I was able to zoom large ...


8

I am not so familiar with US records – all my research is in the British Isles and Australia – but my own decision processes would lead me to conclude with some level of confidence (but not certainty) that this record is not for your target family. I don’t think I can add much to Jan’s excellent answer, but here are some of the criteria I would use to ...


8

Although it may seem otherwise when researching a family with a common name in a limited area, Anglo-Saxon full names (first and last) are surprisingly unique. It's statistically quite uncommon for two full names to be the same. US Death Data The Social Security Death Index (Death Master File) is a file of about 88 million people, a subset of those who ...


8

Ancestry.com's about the database article for the 1810 United States Federal Census asserts: Partial losses included Illinois Territory, which had only two counties (Randolph is extant, St. Clair is lost.), and OH, all lost except Washington County. If the Washington County, Ohio schedules exist, then how can we find the schedules? Failing that, how ...


8

It is Dependent. Formal adoption in law did not exist in Britain until 1926. The change in law being brought about after the large number of orphans created by the First World War and the Influenza epidemic shortly after. Before this time, adoption was an informal process performed in various ways. My understanding is that the Church was usually involved....


8

This answer is an overview of the 1920 Census microfilms and aids for using the census, using your missing ED as a case study. It will cover some of the resources you've already consulted for your question -- consider this a checklist to make sure there aren't resources or techniques that you have overlooked. This is also to make the answer more useful to ...


8

Take a look at the image and scroll back a few pages, to the start of that enumeration book. You will see it shows the location of the regiment at the time of enumeration: Pietermaritzburg, Natal, South Africa If, for some reason, you did not have access to the images, you can go to The National Archives catalogue and search for the reference given in your ...


7

Although there is not as yet a comprehensive list of available pre-1841 Census material, it may be possible to construct one. Please feel free to add what you know. England A Vision of Britain has a range of aggregate population statistics drawn from Census returns, including the pre-1841 Censuses. It is often possible to see a chart of population over time ...


7

Pre-1841 census survivors are generally neither indexed nor transcribed - probably either on-line or in paper. Not even those items associated with the 1801-1831 censuses as, while the "sponsor" of those censuses was the state, the lists of names were, as I understand it, not required by the state so their survival is down to happy, local accidents. As ...


7

I think the occupation written is: Painter (House) Although not capitalized, there are two entries for Keeps house in the following few rows that you can use to compare the "ouse" ending to the word.


7

The report you want is available on Histpop.org. Specifically, go to page 286 of the report titled: Areas, families or separate occupiers, and population, England and Wales, Vol. II. Registration areas, 1911. This shows the sub-districts (in the order they were enumerated) in Wakefield Registration District at the time of the 1911 census: Bretton Sandal ...


7

My first step was to look for the births of children registered with the surname Harris and the mother's maiden name of Earley from 1911 onwards, using the GRO indices. I found 4: Cyril Alexander Harris 1913M quarter Cardiff Austin Harris 1914S quarter Cardiff Esme Harris 1916D quarter Llanelly Jeanie Harris 1918S quarter Llanelly (The GRO indices with ...


7

First, investigate the birth registrations (using the GRO website -- free but you do have to register) for Margaret Amy Williams and Margaret Ann Williams in the June and September quarters in 1899 (both quarters because she was born so close to the June quarter end) and compare the maiden names of the mother with the maiden names of Frederick Williams to ...


7

One possibility is that whoever completed the census return adjusted the surname to, as they saw it, fit in. This is certainly known to happen in Scotland as this link https://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/guides/surnames will illustrate - the particular aspect there is the Anglicisation of surnames and tweaking O'Brien to Brien would be an example of that sort ...


7

If you consult the enumerators schedule associated with this piece, you will find a description of the area covered. In this case, the piece includes (I may have made transcription errors): All that part of the Parish of Saint Mary on the Hill extending from the Hare & Hounds Public House to the West End of the Bottoms Lane comprising all the ...


7

Consider that the "mother-in-law" could actually be a stepmother. It would not be unusual for those two terms to be used interchangeably. Also consider that mistakes happen, and it may not have been the head of household who gave the information to the census enumerator. If the wife gave the information, then she may have quite correctly described ...


6

The Ancestry Wiki offers an Overview of the US Census. They cite William Thorndale and William Dollarhide, Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, 1790–1920 (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1987) for this section: According to the 1850 census instructions, the enumerator, on completing the entry for each family, farm, or shop, was to read the ...


6

Finding streets in the Canada 1921 Census (especially for Toronto) has been discussed in an earlier question. As I wasn't able to find a street index, I compilied a partial one from the descriptions Ancestry supplied for some subdistricts. It doesn't include streets where the subdistrict contains more than one polling subdivision, which is especially ...


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