18

To me the whole question of how much to cite is an artifact of trying to use lineage-linked software as a tool for recording what we find in evidence. It took me years to figure out that these programs are designed to keep track of the material which we have already 'proven' or at least have concluded belongs to the same person. This may sound obvious, but ...


9

The short answer is that you cannot create a "correct" citation because you have nothing to cite. The purpose of a citation is to allow another researcher to identify, locate and re-examine the evidence that you have used. Obviously no-one else will be able to present on the exact car journey where you had the conversation (which is now in the past). The ...


7

It is all about proof or lack of it. Personally I record them all. If you record every piece of information it will help others later to confirm your research and it will also enable you to identify any possible errors. In my experience our ancestors were often 'mistaken' as to their age particularly on census records. I have some whose age varies by 20 ...


7

What is the benefit of using the format for an (in my usage case, privately-held) artifact over the church record certificate format? A good citation tells the reader how to find the relevant source. If it's stored in a box in your attic, the reader needs to know that if they are trying to find that document. Be aware that contemporary copies can differ. I ...


6

Without seeing the specific case I can only give a general answer. If I'm understanding your description, you are looking at an Ancestry index-only database such as the England, Select Births and Christenings, 1538-1975. Let's use that as an example. Why do we write citations? People commonly say that we need to cite our work so that we can find it again, ...


6

My posting summarizes improvements from version 7.6 to 8.0 on this issue: Version 7.6. brings the following improvements: The window listing sources is broader. Sources for an event are indicated in a new column with a book symbol in the person view. Clicking this symbol shows a list of attached sources. However, you can’t add new or existing sources this ...


5

If you Google something to get to a website, you would not usually think of citing Google. By that same reasoning, you have no obligation to cite the intermediary source that may have led you to the actual source of information. While not citing any sources is a bigger problem, I also think there can be a problem of overciting in genealogy. It is so easy ...


5

To some extent at least this is a question of personal preference, and your two suggested alternatives are both kind of extreme options, just at opposite ends of the scale. Personally I tend to create one source for each authority that collects and stores the registration records. So I have sources for civil registrations with names like: Register of ...


5

One aspect is - what will you put in the Address item for the church, when entering the baptism? If you put "Sherborne Abbey" for the address, but mark the sources as authored by the "Abbey Church of St Mary (Sherborne, Dorset, England)", then the question could arise whether the two are one and the same or not. So I think the Address in the baptisms and ...


4

You can simply record the whole conversation as one source (optionally with multiple EVEN structures for multiple distinct topics) and cite it as such: Source: 1 @Sn@ SOUR 2 AUTH myself 2 TITL Stuff I talked about with Jim while in the car last Wednesday optionally: 2 DATA 3 EVEN which event types were talked about 4 DATE date period when the events took ...


4

In QuickLesson 22: What Citation Template Do I Use?, Elizabeth Shown Mills (the author of Evidence Explained) talks about a number of ways that we can shoot ourselves in the foot by worrying about what template to use instead of thinking about the nature of our source material. She calls for "attitude adjustments" -- one of which is quoted here: ...


4

To be useful, information not only needs to be right but also clear and accessible. Perhaps after due digging thru a dictionary or some other reference, someone can eventually figure out what "r" or "v" means. However, far more people will understand "p 11". From your description, it seems this ultimately conveys the same information, so it makes sense to ...


4

It looks to me that the sub-collection number is 3.1.3 (Emigrations), based on the fact that the example shows three dot-separated numbers. However, upon scrolling up on the list, it seems to be 3.1.3.2 (Passenger lists and further compilations on emigrated persons) The document ID is the Reference Code 81740087 as the help page states: When you open the ...


3

The source should show the document you consulted in the form (original or image or PDF) available to you. If the media was only available as a transcript, or index, or offline original, your citation should say so. However you consulted the source, you should include your transcript (as this is the record of what you think the source said. Others might ...


3

It is easy to get lost in the time to create sources and citations - been there, done that. You will change your methods part way through, so don't aim for perfection from the start. So here are a few mental tests to apply: Can someone find the same entry again on the same web-site? Can someone find the same entry in an equivalent source? (By which I mean,...


3

I think that option 1, putting the "Review of" ahead of the book title, is clearer in describing what you are citing. There is enough variation in citation styles that either option should be adequate, unless a particular style is required for publication. If you still are unsure, check the several issues of publication you cited, Chronicles of Oklahoma, ...


3

An interesting question. I am sure I cannot give a full answer but perhaps some pointers to the things that I would think about, might help drive some other aspects out. Firstly, from my perspective (from the UK), why do I want to cite my sources? In order to find them again; To assist me to evaluate this source against another in the event of ...


3

For standard genealogy programs such as Gramps, my recommendation is to cite (i.e. link to) sources that contain multiple events and/or multiple relationships once for each person that is mentioned. Store it as a general source for the person. A census record is an example of a source that could be stored this way. When you have a source pertaining to a ...


3

Cause of Death should not be a new Fact, but rather a Cause field for the existing Death Fact. As such, it would share the sources cited for the Death fact (which in this case would be the Death certificate and the GRO index details), although only the Death certificate would provide the cause info (as well as exact place, age, address, informant, etc...) In ...


2

Another option that hasn't been mentioned here is to use "buddy files". This low-tech solution has advantages because the text is clear and editable, it is searchable, and it will not get wiped by some photo-editing s/w like the Exif/XMP meta-data. It is also possible to add keywords or search terms of your own choosing, and even full transcriptions. A "...


2

I believe that the only information you need to locate an entry is the year that probate was granted and the name of the deceased. The calendars were produced annually, listing all grants of probate for the year alphabetically by the name of the deceased. Each calendar is split into multiple volumes, but that split is alphabetical by name. Personally I ...


2

"Citing or crediting leads?" Citations and credits are different animals, and should be placed in separate sections. Credits are usually earned, by someone going out of their way (multiple hours/days) to help you and your specific project. Leads from search engines, indexes, and shaky leaves are secondary sources, compiled for public consumption, and are ...


2

I transcribe everything. I have found even the tiniest bit of information useful. For example, I found my great grandfather in the 1905 New York State Census (before the rest of the family was there) because the address was the same as where it said he was going on his 1904 passenger manifest to the US. It also said he was going to his "uncle" and the ...


2

I do as you described in your example. Also I link the event to the citation. This is a lot of clicks in the UI but it helps a lot when you come back two years later to continue your research. I wish I had known that sources were SO important when I started genealogy.


1

I do something similar to Option #2, but don't even use a Repository, since these electronic records are on so many web sites. Thus: Source: Oregon, Yamhill County, Index to Marriage Records Citation: Year: YYYY / Volume*: NNNN / Page: XXX Attach it to the Family object who's marriage you're proving, and then drag it to the clipboard. From there I drag the ...


1

The most common citation format in genealogy is based on Chicago style which offers video, online video, film/television, audiovisual materials etc. But generally it has been adapted specifically for genealogical sources by Elizabeth Shown Mills in Evidence Explained. I don't have ready access to Mills' book, but it appears to have different fields based on ...


1

I would suggest that the best way is to imagine someone trying to locate the entry on a microfiche version. If they can do that using your citation, then surely they can do it using another website even if it is only partially indexed. I believe that you need to specify the following: - name of the deceased - date that the probate was granted (this and ...


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