13

I battled with how to approach this when I first set out on my DNA testing 'saga' about two years ago and have learned a few things over now 60 plus completed kits that I manage across multiple family lines over the last 2 years. 1) Form letters = Failure; I cannot emphasize this enough. Just like I don't like getting them, people are irritated by them and ...


12

Unless you find a living cousin who shares your interest in family history, and in DNA tracing, your efforts may be wasted. Those who have no particular interest in family history are unlikely to pony up the cost of a DNA test. Even if you offered to pay for it, just the effort of submitting the test may be more than they're willing to deal with. Also, ...


7

I'm sure you know about the little mail icon on the top bar. If you click on that, it will bring up your inbox, which you can switch to your sent messages. You are correct that there is no search and that the messages are not linked to your match. Adding both of those would be excellent suggestions to make to MyHeritage. With hundreds or more of messages, ...


5

I can offer a few small techniques that are at least alluded to in the question American Luke references, and which have worked for me in the past: Ask specific questions, rather than broad, vague "tell me about your life" queries. I once off-handedly asked my father how his step-father got the nickname "Captain", and got back a long story about the summer ...


4

An important principle to consider when working with any informant is reciprocity. When you interview someone, you're asking them to give up their time and their information / story. What do they get out of it? If the person is also keen on studying the family's history, the relationship can be different -- you are peers working on a collaborative effort. ...


4

There are really two main reasons why you may not get a reply to your Ancestry message: The person does not want to be in contact with you. The person did not receive the message. If (1), there is nothing you can or should do. I'm afraid if your nephew has seen the message and does not want to reply, then that is his decision. Especially with cases of ...


4

There is no single best way to do this but in my research I have come across some similar situations including for some close family as well as had people reach out to me trying to establish a connection to someone who 'may' be related to me. It is not clear exactly what you are hoping to gain from making the connection, and in whatever approach you take I ...


3

Rather than a lawyer, which might give the wrong impression, I would suggest you look for someone who provides counselling and intermediary services for adoption reunions. While your family's case is not technically one of adoption, such a person will be used to handling similar circumstances - where the birth mother has passed away and the surviving ...


3

I can tell you what not to do. I have a pretty bad record when contacting distant relatives. I am good at getting a response, but then I think I throw too much information at them, and they get turned off. Right now I have two second cousins (not really that distant) who are sitting on amazing photographs and family tree information that I would dearly ...


3

An elegant solution to this problem was published by Artefacts in a post dated Sunday, 8 February 2015, on the blog Analytic Genealogy: Genetic genealogy needs horizontal pedigree charts. A seven to nine generation horizontal pedigree model provides a way of easily working with a complex situation. For full fifth cousin matches there are 32 potential ...


1

You have attempted to make contact using the only means made available by Ancestry.com which is their messaging system. If, three times, your message has not been seen and/or responded to then I would suggest not re-sending it, or perhaps only re-sending it again in a few years. In our Help Center we say this this site is not about: Locating ...


1

I keep two online trees, a public version that strips all of that type of information, and a private one that includes everything. To access the private tree, users (family members) must login and be authorized. I find this eliminates a lot of the worries.


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