8

When I have viewed documents at a Family History Center or FamilySearch Affiliate Library in the past I was able to view and download most documents for future access at home. I believe there are some reasonable restrictions on the number of images that can be downloaded, to prevent an entire film from being downloaded, however you are unlikely to reach this ...


8

She's right: If you didn't take the photographs personally, you don't own the copyright and can't prevent her publishing them. The person who took the photograph (and so originally owned the copyright) could, or the person/people who inherited the copyright for up to 70 years after the photographer's death (in the US: terms elsewhere will vary). If the ...


6

You seem to be confusing ownership and licensing. When you submit information to a website such as FamilySearch, you will usually be licensing them the information. The FamilySearch Terms of Use (updated 1 Sep 2018) state: In exchange for your use of this site and/or our storage of any data you submit, you hereby grant us with an unrestricted, fully paid-...


5

Yes, there is the COPR tag for this purpose in the header of the GEDCOM file. In GEDCOM v 5.5.1 (1999), the de facto standard: n HEAD +1 COPR <COPYRIGHT_GEDCOM_FILE> COPYRIGHT_GEDCOM_FILE:= {Size=1:90} A copyright statement needed to protect the copyrights of the submitter of this GEDCOM file. Creative Commons did not exist in 1999 so there is ...


4

We start with a very simple statement: Facts can not be subject to copyright Copyright does not protect facts, ideas, systems, or methods of operation, although it may protect the way these things are expressed What that means is that, however you discover it, the date your ancestor applied for naturalisation (indeed, the very fact that they did so) ...


3

COPR (Copyright) is just a claim of copyright...and legally speaking, copyright is not the same as a license for use and distribution (like Creative Commons). You don't want to conflate the two if you really want legal protection (or the appearance of it). I would recommend putting your copyright statement by itself clearly in a COPR tag: 1 COPR ...


2

The problem is not the copyright it is the Terms of Service. The newspaper itself is out of copyright so if you had taken your own image of an original it would be legal to distribute without any concern. However the contract you enter into when you sign up for Ancestry allow you to use THEIR images of the original ONLY IN THE WAYS THEY APROVE! This is the ...


1

I'd like to address some issues that didn't come up in any of the previous answers. In a comment, you said: The cost to create a census is many times larger than what it would take to digitize them. It seems like digitization could be in the national interest - funded by the Library of Congress, for example. The relative cost of digitization versus ...


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