7

I realize this is a bit of a ramble, and probably not the answer you are looking for. There is something of real value in the question you are asking, and a solution (by extension) would be equally valuable. I would start by splitting up the answer into several components: Version control & collaboration Data format Visualization Integration Version ...


7

I don't know if there's a general best practice, but this is what I do. I create the child as a person and add a death event with the cause of death as "stillborn". If your genealogy software doesn't have a cause of death field then a note would be fine - sometimes I use both. This is how I would distinguish them from a child that died on the same day it ...


6

Without seeing the specific case I can only give a general answer. If I'm understanding your description, you are looking at an Ancestry index-only database such as the England, Select Births and Christenings, 1538-1975. Let's use that as an example. Why do we write citations? People commonly say that we need to cite our work so that we can find it again, ...


6

The GEDCOM standard allows for a date that is interpreted from another date. The keyword "INT" indicates that what follows is the Gregorian DATE you've interpreted followed by the DATE_PHRASE you interpreted it from. The DATE_PHRASE is enclosed in parenthesis. You should always translate the date the best you can to a Gregorian date, as that will be the ...


6

The following symbols are used in genograms and other descendant charts to denote a childless union and individuals without children: (Google: chart symbols "no offspring" for examples of use and other variant forms) Pedigree charts (where all the parents/ancestors of course have an offspring) don't need this symbol. Genealogical reports tend to use ...


6

The GEDCOM standard includes STILLBORN as one of the possible values for its AGE_AT_EVENT item. It gives the following example: 1 DEAT 2 DATE 13 MAY 1984 2 AGE STILLBORN with the meaning that this person died at age approximately 0 days old. Although the GEDCOM example shows this on a death event, I have also seen it on the birth event. GEDCOM also gives ...


5

Disclaimer: I'm assuming common GEDCOM or textual formats here. If the platform or software you are using requires a place of death in all circumstances, there are maybe special recommendations how to handle cases with missing information. If you know the place of death (hospital, home, street corner), you should list it. If you only know the last residence ...


4

If you want strict Gedcom compliance, then your only options are 'Census' and 'Residence'. (Some programmes will allow you to generate custom events, but those won't 'travel well'). I would use 'Census'. Although not actually a Census, it was: designed to capture the details of every member of the civilian population on a specific date (from the National ...


4

Whether you are writing a report or entering information into genealogical software, it's easy to overlook that what we are recording is our conclusion about where the death took place. Well-thought-out research isn't a multiple choice test where we are offered a selection of answers, out of which we are asked to pick the best one. It is a process, which ...


4

I've just left a long post on the other question mentioned already, What tools exist for collecting and managing evidence? Computer tools don't seem to exist for the kind of source management I want to do. In a paper-based system I can index any assertion in any source document I have, thus making it easy to pull out whatever source material I want to ...


4

For me, the only logical way to do genealogy is to record observations, be they statements from living people, or documents in a system. The software should then assist in creating assertions based on these observations and create an hypothetical family tree automatically from the assertions. It should all be driven by rules and probabilities. This is in ...


3

When I read Python and Django, the obvious answer is Gramps. Please check our site at https://gramps-project.org/ to see if it would be useful for you.


3

Most of my British ancestors have only one or no middle name which makes it easy i.e. I would leave the middle name field blank for those without one. However, my 4th great grandmother (Louisa Dorothea Wedderburn Hope Moore) does have four personal names like your worst case so I will use her as an example of what I do in Ancestry.com which has two name ...


3

If you know the city a person died, then that is what should be entered. e.g. If a person lives in Chicago, but died when on vacation in Paris, then Paris is the death place. If you know they were out of their home city when they died, but you don't know where, then do not enter a death place. If you know the specific location where a person died, e.g. a ...


3

If you have not already done so, try looking at the Forebears website. It has a page of the common surnames for most countries. This is a link to the page for the Netherlands and you should just be able to copy the data from there with a cut and paste.


3

I have a .gramps file That's a backup created by Gramps. I think stores all the data Incorrect. but when I launch the app, I have to select a family tree. What is it? Exactly what it says: a family tree. You can have multiple trees in Gramps. Can't I just put everything in a single file and when I modify something just save it to this file? No. That'...


2

I would say that the answer depends on what you are going to use your data for. In my case I enter the 1939 as a census but when I produce reports for general consumption, I omit all types of census and just print the information about the person. What matters is their job, residence, birth details, etc. It's hardly that interesting to know that they were ...


2

Genealogists will never use git directly, but a frontend is eminently possible. Neither XML or (to a lesser extent) json map well to a line-based version control system (because it can be hard to retain the structure when a individual lines are changed by different people at the same time). The only real problem with using git for version control of ...


2

Until the post-conference reports appear, one can review the technical content of RootsTech 2015 by going to the conference schedule and filtering for the "Innovator Summit" track. The handouts for the presentations and workshops are available for download: see the 2015 Class Syllabus (use the Class Numbers from the schedule to find the presentation you are ...


2

In my Brother's Keeper software there are several event fields which can be added to denote children or lack there of: Never married No children from this person No children from this marriage Number of children (person) Number of children (family) It comes in handy when printing reports with obituaries which list a current spouse plus children from ...


2

I have to add my twopennyworth here for public viewing. One of my research difficulties, when making a case for whether two named people are the same or different, is the lack of appropriate information about administrative and ecclesiastic divisions, and even streets in a town or city. Let me explain: administrative regions would have names and boundaries ...


1

I'd agree with you about staying away from migration analysis. It seems like a really good idea, but you'd have to find a very large dataset in order to discover anything interesting. I tried doing this with FamilySearch's database a few years ago and came up empty. (You may have better luck than I did though.) Maybe you could get the Geni database. It's ...


1

As far as software conventions go, it depends on the software. I've used Legacy Family Tree for many years, and they have a checkbox on the marriage/couple screen for specifying "no children". As @ColeValleyGirl mentions in the comment to your question, most software won't assume there are no children when none have been entered -- this could mean that none ...


1

So far, I don't know how one makes the transition. The question is "How do you store evidence about persons, once you have reached the transition into record based genealogy,... Not to be too pedantic, but this portion of the question (from the OP) assumes that the person has already made the transition mentally. Most of the other answers are fine, but ...


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