8

When I have viewed documents at a Family History Center or FamilySearch Affiliate Library in the past I was able to view and download most documents for future access at home. I believe there are some reasonable restrictions on the number of images that can be downloaded, to prevent an entire film from being downloaded, however you are unlikely to reach this ...


8

If I understand correctly, you have around 10,000 church records in 1,000 images. You want to be able to enter a name that is on one of the records and then find the image it is on. Ideally you would also want to indicate which of the 5-15 entries per page is the correct entry, but for such a small number of images per page that seems optional. ...


7

I use a number of file-naming patterns, depending on the image source and the collection. The key, for me, is consistency within the collection. Since I use text files to keep index entries and transcriptions together, it's easy to also cross-reference the filenames and urls. When a new collection is published, I may play with the file-names several times ...


5

I would create a database using a package like OpenOffice or LibreOffice. These are available for Mac, Windows & Linux and are free. This is similar to Access in Microsoft Office or to the much larger MySQL. Create a data table for your images, which can be imported from a CSV file, which also contains the image name and location. Create another table ...


5

GenScriber does allow linking to media, and multiple hyperlinks can be used in a single cell. You can link to multiple images for a single record. GenScriber will also export nicely formatted html complete with links. Also, the sort in genscriber will never trash your data. It always sorts across all columns. It also has multiple column sort. I am working ...


4

This answer has been revised -- the beginning of this answer addresses the problem posed in the question about source material like birth certificates which name more than one person. I store my electronic documents by record type and record group, with subfolders for each vendor if necessary (e.g. if I have census images from both Ancestry and Heritage ...


4

I am one of the cofounders of ENISoftware, which just released ENIndexer. I don't believe our software would be right for your needs, as it is primarily a solution for creating "back of the book" every name indexes. Based on your original post, it sounds to me like Genscriber in its wine wrapped version is the clsoest thing available to what you are trying ...


4

This question has two related parts - one to do with digitization of these records, and the other where the records should be archived. If possible, I would consider digitizing the records yourself. After having a digital record of the items, an archive, museum, or library is absolutely the best place for long-term preservation of these items. While an ...


3

Personally, I recommend putting all of your own research on all of your sides into one data file. This way, whenever you do research, no matter which side you are working on, you have your information. One file will allow you to combine common items, such as common family branches, places and sources. When sharing with family, most people won't want just ...


3

This is a somewhat odd answer in that I would suggest a relatively non-hierarchical filing system, one with as few folders as possible. Specifically, I would suggest leaving most documents lumped together in one "genealogy" folder. Title each image with the name of the person or persons, the type of record and perhaps the date of the record if that isn't in ...


3

I'm trying Qiqqa ("quicker" in an Australian accent), a free research and reference manager popular among my fellow scientists. If you point it at a folder, it will process all the pdfs, pulling out the title (regardless of file name), and metadata. It has duplicate file recognition. You can set it up with a watch folder, and it will process newly added ...


3

What works well for me is an adaptation of William Dollarhide's system. All my source documents are given a record number in the following format: S-ST-CTY-XXX- Subject name, Source Description (where source document was found), where S= 1st Initial of Family Group Surname ST= State where the document originated CTY= County where source document originated ...


2

The questions of whether the records still belong to the United Ancient Order of Druids, and how to find a more permanent home for these records, are two related questions, which could be summed up together as Where do these records belong? If I had records of a similar nature for the United States, to answer the legal question of where these records ...


2

Most large universities and colleges have these sorts of scanners available for use for a nominal fee per scan, or potentially for free, especially if you are an affiliate of the school (i.e. if you have any children or cousins in college, use them to get access for free). For instance, Dartmouth College lists the following for scanning options: https://www....


2

Following up on the previous attempts: Searching the Catalog -- Putting 4548813 in the field Film/Fiche Number resulted in four catalog entries, one of which is Census returns for Kilmarnock (parish 597), 1841-1891, linked to in the question. The film notes show the two different filmings and notes that one series of films should be consulted before ...


2

I found what looks like a useful blog posting entitled My Ancestor Family File Folders and File Naming Convention by Randy Seaver: One of the challenges of having a lot of ancestors and a lot of digitized documents and photographs is organizing all of this "stuff" in a file system, whether digital or paper. This post is about my digital ...


2

Here are some things you might want to consider when making this decision. How big are the files likely to be (how many people)? If a project is really big, it could be cumbersome to work with. If your parents came from two completely separate communities and the only overlap in their histories comes after their marriage, there might be an argument for ...


2

I just saw the announcement of ENIndexer (Mac, Windows). It helps to create name indexes for books and similar documents. There is however no linking to source files. There is a trial available, the price tag is 74,95 USD.


2

I won't comment on the file naming as others have but will offer an alternative to Irfanview. Right click on the image select properties > details and then click the text to the right of the title header. You can then type in there whatever title you wish including the full url or whatever you wish. You can also change any of the other data here such as ...


1

I don't worry whether an image comes from FamilySearch, Ancestry, ScotlandsPeople, the Norwegian National Archives, etc. What's important to me are the Four* Questions Of Fact Gathering: Who What When Where With that, I can backtrack to the original source, no matter if the original web site decides to rename everything, and the names are meaningful to non-...


1

I have been scanning a series of old adhesive "Magnetic" photo albums from the 1970s. My work flow has been like this: Cut a page out of the album with scissors or a knife (careful not to cut through photos on the back of the page). For some albums, the page will then "unfold" and you will have a separate page for the front and back of the original page. ...


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