7

Don't just look at the alphabetical listings -- examine the entire directory for clues. The best internal evidence I have for the lead time so far is in some of the Price and Lee directories from New England which have lists of deaths and marriages from the previous year. Those run from December to December. E.g. 1890 Holyoke Mass has Deaths from Dec 1, ...


6

I think the writing in the last column of entry 499 says: A. Pope Offg Min. [Officiating Minister] and that the occupation is: Mariner


5

Certainly the date for the events should correspond to the effective date of the information in the Directory, and this is probably some time before the nominal date in the title of the Directory in question. Finding such an effective date is another matter! Options include: If you're really lucky, the Directory might actually contain a phrase along the ...


5

Harry Avery was a painter and paper hanger. If you consult the full text of The town register: Waldoboro, Nobleboro and Jefferson, 1906 at archive.org, page 101 explains some of the common occupation abbreviations including ptr (painter). If you search for the abbreviation ptr in the same document, you'll find quite a few ptrs, and also some ptr & pap ...


5

One possible line of inquiry (the one I would do next) is to investigate the properties themselves. What kind of properties were in that section of Main Street at that time? Can you find property records for the period that say who owned the properties? Did any of the properties sell? Look for information in any record you can think of -- newspapers, ...


5

RFD = Rural Free Delivery, referring to those people on the rural mail routes. The numeral will refer to the route. The abbreviation is noted in the introductory information of a 1914 Missouri directory. Wikipedia also provides a good overview of Rural Free Delivery. Rural Free Delivery (RFD) is a service which began in the United States in the late ...


3

I suspect that in 1890 H.M. may be Her Majesty's but C. might be Customs, Commissioner, Cutter or something else. The asker commented: I found Sands dir's in Ancestry. Found no list of abbr'ns there. I searched Trove newspapers for Henry Gill. Found other names in Sands with "HMC" and searched Trove for their names hoping to see what HMC means. ...


3

I'm not too convinced that your ancestor, born in 1878, would appear in a directory in 1885. There's a history of Hindmarsh at www.sahistorians.org.au/175/bm.../a-heritage-history-of-hindmarsh.doc which indicates that Hindmarsh Model School was founded in 1878.


2

I found one directory for 1906 where the listing of companies in the rear listed the same address for which the abbreviation confy was used under Confectionary. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. See pages 934 and 938 of the images of the directory for Confectionary ...


2

With some useful ideas thrown in by others I did some more research in the Sands and Macdougall Directories and Trove newspapers and noticed the timeline below: Adelaide Observer on 24 Nov 1883 - Lavinia R Sellar was appointed by the Education Department as head mistress of infant department, Hindmarsh 1884 Sands and Macdougall Directory (see question for ...


2

If the layout is similar to the City Directories I am familiar with from the New England region in the USA, your 'subheading' of Regent Street is an indication where Regent Street crosses Halifax Street. Unless there has been a massive re-naming and re-numbering, these cross-street indicators allow the reader to see whether there have been re-numberings and ...


2

This may fall into the "teach granny to suck eggs" category, but here goes. It has worked for me more than once. If the gentleman has descendants, than in all probability (although not definitively) he was married. Search for any marriages of that gent (surname plus two initials), principally, but not necessarily, in the Brighton area. If successful, and ...


2

I see no way to distinguish based on city records alone between a husband who split and a husband who died. About the only thing you can deduce from the City Directories that in 1904 there seems to have been no longer any need to distinguish between William jr. and William sr. You presumably have ages and professions from the 1900 US census. That should ...


2

If you want to find historical city directories for the United States, it is ridiculously time-consuming to look for them one at a time by the title of the directory. So how do you find them? By using library catalogs, archival catalogs, and other resources to look for inventories and other works which talk about what city directories were published, ...


2

Carefully. Consider the following from genwriters Several publishers wrote that they relied on street canvassing and the willingness of residents to offer information/identification. Contrast that with a legal requirement to participate in Federal or State Censuses. And we all know that the Federal and State Censuses may "miss" people. I personally try not ...


1

I'd offer a couple of options besides deceased or separated/divorced. He could be either in a prison or, more likely considering his occupation, in a sanitorium for tuberculosis or lung disease. That night explain the non-widow status, and the change afterwords. It might be possible to check locations near where his wife was staying to see if any ...


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