Hot answers tagged

19

I think the answer is simply that these DNA testing companies are all American companies and have primarily targeted the American, European, and Australian markets. I suspect they have a comparatively small number of customers in the Middle East and Caucasus. 23andme only ships to 50 countries, and only two countries in the Middle East (Israel and Cyprus). ...


13

(Note: I did not view the updated part of the question before writing this answer, so my original answer does not address the specific scenario added in the update. See the section below the dividing line for the specific question of the generational 'range' of various tests.) The Problem with Ancestry DNA You're probably already aware of this, but Ancestry ...


13

I battled with how to approach this when I first set out on my DNA testing 'saga' about two years ago and have learned a few things over now 60 plus completed kits that I manage across multiple family lines over the last 2 years. 1) Form letters = Failure; I cannot emphasize this enough. Just like I don't like getting them, people are irritated by them and ...


12

Unless you find a living cousin who shares your interest in family history, and in DNA tracing, your efforts may be wasted. Those who have no particular interest in family history are unlikely to pony up the cost of a DNA test. Even if you offered to pay for it, just the effort of submitting the test may be more than they're willing to deal with. Also, ...


10

You're definitely on the right track in terms of possible relationships (cross referencing the cM counts you gave with the ones http://thegeneticgenealogist.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Shared-cM-Project-Version-2-UPDATED-1.pdf does indeed suggest a 2C / 2C1R or comparable relationship). It sounds as if you understand everything correctly so far - it's ...


10

The amount of autosomal DNA shared by 6th or 7th cousins is quite small. Some will share no detectable DNA. The latest data of the Shared cM Project shows that seventh cousins share between 0 and 57 cM, with an average of 13 cM. The Y-DNA plays no role in this. Your female match has two X-chromosomes, and you have an X and a Y, but assuming this cousin is ...


10

I think you just posted that question to make all other genealogists envious of what you have to work with. :-) But seriously, yes, there are some things you should do and do as soon as possible (i.e. before the candidates are no longer here). Seeing your goals, I would suggest you work towards trying to get sets of three siblings tested at your parents ...


10

It looks like this may be due to a difference in the Genome Builds (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reference_genome#Human_reference_genome) used between the two tools. GEDMatch reports that they store data in Build 36 format (https://www.gedmatch.com/gedwiki/index.php?title=DNA_Upload). Louis Kessler noted that MyHeritage raw data is downloaded in Build 37 ...


10

This could also be explained if the parents share DNA. If you took the same test with your father and it also was > 50%, it could indicate they are distantly related. A single shared chromosome could appear as ~52%. Even if dad only shows 50%, he could have passed the shared DNA but mom did not pass it down, so it would overlap with the DNA mom did not ...


9

I obtained my Y-DNA haplogroup from my AncestryDNA raw DNA file using the first method detailed in this link: https://www.geneticgenealogist.net/2016/01/how-to-get-ydna-haplogroup-from.html In short, it goes through 3 steps: 1/ you convert your AncestryDNA raw DNA file into 23andme format using a small VBS program you can obtain from here: drive.google....


9

I had my 93 year old uncle take a test after he agreed to do it. I did not feel comfortable asking him to do it, or for me to attempt to administer it. My uncle was at a nursing home. I asked one of the health care aids to administer it. My uncle trusted the aid and even though he was uncomfortable for a few seconds, the aid knew how to handle it and it ...


9

I didn't want to say anything until I was back home, but bringing everything in my carry on bag in both directions, worked. So, I'm now home successfully with 8 vials of DNA sample obtained from relatives in a foreign country. I actually phoned FTDNA about this issue before leaving and they assured me that it wouldn't be a problem and very kindly emailed me ...


9

It depends somewhat on the ethnicity and how distinguishable it is from the predominant ethnicity. For example, it seems that trace amounts of DNA from Native American ancestors is more difficult to identify in the DNA of a person of mostly European ancestry than trace amounts of DNA from African ancestors. In the case you present of DNA from African ...


9

I think the prior answers are either misleading or wrong, and people should not miss out on the opportunity to get great DNA information because they were discouraged by those answers. If you have the DNA for Charlie (the parent), and any of Charlie's children (Dick, Elizabeth, Frank, and George), you can at least partially phase a child (and thus pseudo-...


8

Yes, a Y-DNA STR test would be the ideal test for testing whether two people share the same paternal lineage. I would suggest taking a test with a high number of STR markers (e.g. 67 markers) to be sure of a match. You would expect a person and their uncle to match at a very high number of markers (probably 67/67). For your uncle to be tested, you would ...


8

23andMe detects SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) on the nuclear chromosomes and the mitochondrial chromosome. SNPs are places where one "letter" (base) of the DNA sequence is known to have two variations (or, in very rare locations, three or four variations) occur in the human population. They use a special chip that simutaneously checks for the ...


8

Each entities lab's time are different and it also depends on what test you perform. This is due to them queuing up tests into large scale batches to use shared labs since many do not have their own lab with the exception of FamilyTreeDNA. The general process for the tests appears to be the following which is important to understand when examining ...


8

Yes it is very common to only have few or no matches at higher levels. I recently have been advising someone who got screaming mad (literally) about spending so much money and having no matches.. so the important thing here is patience. From 2009-late 2014 I personally had 0 matches.. even at Y37. It was 4 months ago I got a Y67 and until yesterday didn'...


8

The adoptee is very likely your niece, specifically the half-sibling of the niece you have also tested. The relationship could be diagrammed as follows: The X-DNA is key to determining this relationship. A useful article to help understand X-DNA matches is X Chromosome Recombination's Impact on DNA Genealogy. You know that the adoptee is a nearly 100% half ...


8

Mitochondrial DNA mutates very slowly. Like on the order of one mutation in a thousand or so years. FamilyTreeDNA have published a guide on Understanding Your mtDNA Full Sequence Results. For the Full Sequence mtDNA test you have done, with a match genetic distance of 0 (i.e. a perfect match) you can be 95% confident that the common maternal ancestor ...


8

As of 2010, there were about 28,000 documented dues-paying Mayflower descendants. There have probably been about 16 million DNA tests taken by people in the United States, or about 1 out of every 20 people. Mayflower Society members may be more interested in their Ancestry than the typical person, so lets say 1 out of every 14 of them have taken a DNA test. ...


8

Errors of this magnitude are possible but very very rare. I'm sorry I don't have the documentation but there was discussion on at least one of the lists/groups for genetic genealogy about a case where an AncestryDNA customer was told that someone matched her as a parent. Huge surprise. Turned out to be a bizarre error and the two people weren't even ...


8

Absolutely not. The amount of saliva is a factor in whether or not you get DNA results at all. If you have them, that's it. While there is such a thing as "partial results" it's because you need multiple passes of the DNA sequence to make sure there aren't errors. No testing company will give you results if they don't get enough passes. A very small ...


8

It's statistics. "Accurate" simply doesn't apply: a prediction may be 99% likely, but that will not mean a thing to that 1 in 100 where it fails -- and you have no way of knowing which group you fall into. More specifically, the ancestry timeline on 23andMe makes certain underlying assumptions that may or may not be true. One assumption is that their ...


7

Short answer: not yet. Longer answer: Distant ancestry from DNA has been likened to "genetic astrology", although others consider that unfair. There's evidence to support some of the distant ancestry reports produced by genealogy companies, but there are also assumptions and statements that do not yet have enough evidence to support them. To be able to ...


7

It is sometimes possible to extract DNA in such situations but it is a very expensive process and there is no guarantee of success. You have to pay the money upfront regardless of whether the tests are successful. The best chance of success is with mtDNA because there is a lot of mtDNA in each cell. I believe the success rate is very low for Y-DNA. There is ...


7

For a person who is related somewhat distantly (say, third cousin or farther), it is common to share only a single DNA segment (if any). The shared segment may be located on an autosome or, if the relationship is through relevant maternal connections, it may be located on the X chromosome. Thus it is quite common to have results where there is a shared X ...


7

First, it is important to note that all the probabilities provided in these charts are estimations. Different formulas have been proposed and used to give us an idea of what a relationship might be based on a given genetic distance, but they are nothing more than estimates. Fundamental to these charts is the concept of Time to Most Recent Common Ancestor (...


7

One of my favorite math teachers in high school told us that whenever we got stumped, we should draw a picture to get a better definition of what the problem was. Here's a recent (12 June 2015) article by Louise Coakley, X-DNA's helpful inheritance patterns. Coakley published several graphs with the possible lines of descent marked out. Coakley says: ...


7

The short answer is being you have completed a very basic Y test and you should have met ftDNA's internal requirements of first doing a Y-## test before being able to order a BigY test and even if your kit does not show it, call them and they will add it to your cart or send you a special checkout URL.If they insist on adding a Y test you can request they ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible