7

This answer provides some historical context, but does not completely answer the question. Baden & Württemberg experienced large emigrations in the 1820s to 1850s, to Hungary (recruited by Austria-Hungary to re-settle lands recovered from the Ottomans, in the Banat and Transylvania) and to North and South America. The aftermath of the Napoleonic wars ...


6

I'm new to "Genealogy & Family History". I'm a native English speaker, but have been researching Eastern European places for nearly 20 years now. I've never heard of Wortono, but let me suggest a few approaches to this: the most basic thing to try is entering something like "Wortono, Russia" in a couple search engines (like Google, Bing, Yandex) and ...


5

Forced emigration did happen in Baden Germany during the early to mid 1850s. I'm currently researching two towns that sent people to America this way. On January 2, 1855, sixty-nine people left Scherzheim, Germany, a small village set in the Upper Rhine Valley in the southwest part of the grand duchy of Baden. They faced a four thousand mile journey ...


5

When I get stuck, I find it helpful to step back from where I am and review what I already have, starting over again as if the problem was completely new to me, and pretending that I am a complete beginner. One problem with studying family history, especially for those of us who have learned it by gathering records online, is that the big-box data providers ...


5

Without further information (where in central or north-western Russia it was located or whether it was a big or small town, etc), it will be difficult to identify the place with any certainty. I took a look in The Geographical Dictionary of the Kingdom of Poland and other Slavic Countries for the town but did not find anything. Towns with names beginning ...


4

Ancestry has a Collection of UK Outward Passenger Lists 1890-1960 which include "Transmigrants" departures from Liverpool in 1921, including the SS Canada. You can search by departure year and place and ship name. Findmypast has the same dataset. If you don't have a subscription to Ancestry it's worth looking out for 'free weekends'. It's very likely that ...


4

This is what I've found so far: Wikipedia, History of Rail Transport in Germany, The Länderbahn era (1871 to 1920) and Geschichte der Eisenbahn in Deutschland on de.wikipedia.org Wikipedia, Royal Saxon State Railways has a map from 1902 (a good starting point, but a little too late for my period) European Transportation Maps of the 19th Century at the ...


4

Maybe Wortono is a misspelling of Воротыня (Vorotynya), a small village in the Vologda oblast. See the Russian Wikipedia article for Воротыня.


4

If "Wortono" is taken literally as cyrillic "Шoгtoпo" or "щoгtoпo"(approximately shogtopo) ;it doesn't appear as a place or a valid word.. or at first glance sound Russian. "W" does not exist is Russian Cyrillic or is used in Baltic State languages, and "Ш" is the closest thing to it and the 'r' looking character may be a "g" sound for "г" and the 'n' ...


3

Before the start of civil registration, vital records were the responsibility of churches. According to Dvorzsák's gazetteer (https://kt.lib.pte.hu/cgi-bin/kt.cgi?konyvtar/kt03110501/0_0_1_pg_14.html), Jewish residents of Gecse in Abaúj-Torna county were recorded in Szina (Abaújszina, now Seňa, Slovakia). Unfortunately, FamilySearch does not appear to have ...


3

I have this surname too from a large family of cyclists in Newark, NJ. I am not sure the earliest history but can tell you that we are also linked to Baden as another of our ancestor (Conrad Kazenmeyer, clerk? of Baden) was captured on some land while hiding between Switzerland and Germany and exiled. His wife pleaded for his life and he was released but ...


3

In the 1911 UK census he is called Stan, which is indeed possibly a shortened version of Stanley. He was a 26 year old boarder at 19 Blissett Street, Greenwich, and his occupation was Engineer. His birthplace is recorded as Buakaw or Buakan (difficult to read due to a correction on the form) in Rumania. As the form was filled out by the homeowner, he might ...


1

This is not a conclusive answer per se, but might aid as a lead to further investigate your German heritage. There is a (commercial) German website called Archion.de, also available in English, see link. There you can search for places like #Ballenstedt (not the # in front!). However, there are at the moment (in 2020) about half of the German church books ...


1

There was a Jewish community in Ballenstedt and it seems that it was shrinking over time. They had a synagoge build in 1791 and today there still is a Jewish cemetery there (but only 15 gravestones left). A quick overview over the history of the Jewish community in that town gives this page (German). I'm not an expert on Jewish records. GenWiki (German) ...


1

Germany unified in 1871 after the Franco-German war. But for some Germans, the definition of nation did not include pluralism, and Catholics in particular came under scrutiny; some Germans, and especially Bismarck, feared that the Catholics' connection to the papacy might make them less loyal to the nation. Several laws were passed from 1871-1876 putting the ...


1

Here is the link to the Library and Archives database for immigration through the port of Quebec: http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/immigration/immigration-records/passenger-lists/passenger-lists-quebec-port-1865-1900/Pages/introduction.aspx


1

I think the answer is largely in front of you, "From What County Selected" is where they were selected from for immigration, but not where they are originally from or currently residing. The bankruptcy / debt notice you posted you posted is where at the time of the filing where announced and which court jurisdiction it was in. Over the four years in ...


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