18

You found your ancestors in a city directory, and city directories usually have business information in them; in fact, sometimes they only have business information and not residential. In Ancestry, pulling up the 1939 Polk's City Directory for Worcester, Massachusetts, we can head for the S pages and look for SVO. However, we do not find one, so we need to ...


11

Here's an update. I'm a FamilySearch wiki contributor. Canal Zone Employment records have been digitized and are searchable in the FamilySearch website. A description of these records is available at the FamilySearch wiki: United States, Panama Canal Zone, Employment Records and Sailing lists, 1905-1937)


6

Create a biographical sketch and timeline, and a research plan. To find his records in any archive, first you need to have enough specific information to be sure that you are asking about the right individual. You read newspaper accounts in the scrapbook, so if you don't have access to the scrapbook, step one would be to find the newspaper accounts, and ...


6

Another directory, this one for Waltham Ma., has an entry which may explain (all emphasis mine): SVO Corp Socony Vacuum Oil Corp This was one of the big oil companies of the time: Vacuum Oil and Standard Oil of New York (Socony) merged in 1931, after the government gave up attempts to prevent it. The newly-combined entity, Socony-Vacuum Corp, was the ...


6

So, I appreciate everyone's help, but I found the answer in my great grandpa's second registration for the draft for both World Wars. He volunteered for WWI, but he was 45 at the time of the WWII draft. He never served in the second WW. Anyways, here's the picture that will clear everything up:


6

Regrettably such records could be almost anywhere or nowhere. The County Record Office is the obvious place to start. Then any other archives in the area. Depending on the history of the place, it's not impossible that records remain there. Tatton Park, now National Trust, recently published some of its accounts and I think that the papers remained there. ...


5

I don't have a specific answer but thought the following information might help. There are a couple of libraries which may have records you are looking for. From the Nottinghamshire gov website's page on the History of Rufford Abbey, "We have a range of photographs and documents on display. These were recently donated to Ollerton Library." The page also ...


5

The site Convict Records lists 389 different ships that made a total of 720 voyages to Australia carrying convicts. There are many, many possibilities for the ones on which your ancestor (is reputed to have) served. For example there were 20 voyages in 1836 and even 14 in 1843 when the flood of convicts was beginning to be reduced. While the The British ...


4

I have discovered more information and just located news archives with many Frances Murphy incidents of bravery and duty. "Slattery's Raiders", a group of officers under the command of Captain John J. Slattery, Jr. that was formed to combat vice and street crime in Boston. Members of the elite unit called Slatterys Raiders. John J. Slattery, 86, deputy ...


4

Historical Background From Wikipedia's article on the Works Progress Administration: The Works Progress Administration (renamed in 1939 as the Work Projects Administration; WPA) was the largest and most ambitious New Deal agency, employing millions of unemployed people (mostly unskilled men) to carry out public works projects, including the ...


4

The basic principle in studying family history is always to start what you know and work outwards from there in small increments. If you have a street address from the 1881 Census, or at least a district, the first thing I would do is look into the history of London street re-numbering -- I would not assume that any historical address that I found could be ...


4

Firstly, Phthisis was the old name of tuberculosis, so your suggestion on that is correct. In the 1800s, what we now always call science was more commonly known as natural philosophy. So a scientific instrument and a philosophical instrument would have been the same thing. Such instruments at that time would almost certainly have fallen into one of three ...


4

Well, I don't have a full answer to my question, but I do have a partial answer thanks to some impressively fast research by a coworker. It turns out, Department 67 was the department that made Remington-branded typewriters, and Department 66 appears to have made typewriters to sell to other companies so that they could rebrand them. While I did say that ...


3

I found this on the 1940census.archives. gov FAQ page: Q: I found someone who is listed as assigned to emergency public work for the CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps), WPA (Works Project/Progress Administration), or NYA (National Youth Administration). Where can I find more information about this person's work? A: We may have additional ...


2

This is tangential to the original question, but of interest to those whose relatives worked in the Canal. You may want to read the book, "Blue Book of Panama," published in 1914, in Panama. It was intended as a commercial directory / publicity book for Panama sponsored by the United Fruit Company to attract investors to Panama. However, the book also has a ...


1

This is not a complete answer but I just found the Reports from committees of the House of Commons: which have been printed by order of the House, and are not inserted in the journals; reprinted by order of the House, Volume 12 in 1803 which has on page 346 the text below: The Prisoners of War Department of the Transport Office employed three clerks with ...


1

I'm not sure how I missed this in my original searches but there is a search page for South Australia Police 1838 to 1920 by Maureen M Leadbeater. The entry for Thomas Hitchcox there is: Surname: HITCHCOX Given name(s): Thomas Joined: 1-8-1855 Notes: resigned 12-4-1856, Tpr 16-6-1856, resigned 10-6-1857 Sources: GRG5/16, GRG5/23, GG 1855-7 ... Tpr = ...


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