19

I think the answer is simply that these DNA testing companies are all American companies and have primarily targeted the American, European, and Australian markets. I suspect they have a comparatively small number of customers in the Middle East and Caucasus. 23andme only ships to 50 countries, and only two countries in the Middle East (Israel and Cyprus). ...


9

It depends somewhat on the ethnicity and how distinguishable it is from the predominant ethnicity. For example, it seems that trace amounts of DNA from Native American ancestors is more difficult to identify in the DNA of a person of mostly European ancestry than trace amounts of DNA from African ancestors. In the case you present of DNA from African ...


7

You could try MyHeritage DNA. They are the DNA Branch of MyHeritage based in Israel, and they have a larger portion of European and Middle East customers than the other DNA testing companies. They just started their DNA testing about a year ago, so their number of testers is smaller than the other testing companies, but may be able to grow very large due to ...


6

Germany is usually considered to be part of Western Europe, therefore Western European would be the natural option to choose. However assuming you are American I would be surprised if all your ancestors came from the same place in Germany. Therefore, putting a label on your "lineage" may be quite meaningless. In my case, I have yet to locate an ancestor ...


6

Each of us has 128 x 5th great grandparents (assuming no inbreeding) which, if only one of them was African, suggests that your cousin might be about 0.78% African. Consequently, a result of 2% African, is a little more than might be expected, but certainly a reasonable value.


5

Ancestry and other companies compare your results with groups of people who are living today in various places, groups called reference populations. They choose people whose families have lived in the same place for a certain amount of time. Do keep in mind that all these estimates are only that: estimates. I highly recommend the entire series of blog ...


5

There's an underlying problem with this question (both as it was originally posed, and in its edited form), namely, it assumes that the ethnicity estimates can be applied to the paper-trail genealogy in this way. First one needs to consider if the ethnicity estimates are accurate, or even if they can be. Companies use these results to engage new customers, ...


4

Before 1952, the state today known as Baden-Württemberg did not exist. In 1880, Baden and Württemberg were separate countries, which were part of united Germany since only 9 years, but had large autonomy within the country. Germany was stable in 1880, there was no such thing as a Civil War or any social unrest you're mentioning. Germany had social unrest in ...


4

The US Census Bureau defines "White" as: A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa. It includes people who indicated their race(s) as "White" or reported entries such as Irish, German, Italian, Lebanese, Arab, Moroccan, or Caucasian. We could have an endless debate on whether this is a ...


4

Although 20% European is a significant proportion, I doubt the answer is as easy as all of it coming to you from single grandparent. More likely, more than 1 grandparent (each contributing about 25% to you) was already mixed ethnicity. This might verifiable in other records. It is interesting that the 3% Native American + Asian component is 1/32. It might ...


3

23andMe will do what you wish and tell you what parts of your DNA they matched to each ethnicity they found for you. They will not provide you directly with the exact segment data, but if you inspect the source of the web page that produces the information for you, you can pull out the numbers they use, e.g.: The above lines says that the unassigned ...


3

Specific ethnicity reports are very misleading, as the field is very new. And Scandinavian DNA has been notoriously over-reported from the beginning. It's fun to play with the tools and reports, but don't be surprised if your ethnic roots change over the next few years. :-) Go to GEDmatch.com Click "Admixture (heritage)" Check "Chromosome Painting - ...


3

The DNA tests are usually quite accurate, and it is likely that one of your genetic grandparents indeed has the differing ancestry. If you are in the situation that you believe you know who all your grandparents are, and that the ethnic connection does not seem possible, then this is likely what is best known as (in genealogical DNA analysis) as an NPE ...


3

The short and simple answer is that when AncestryDNA gives you an estimate of your ethnicity, they're just guessing. Each company has different ways of making the estimate, and over time, they try to refine the estimate -- but it's still an educated guess. In her Apr 16, 2017 post "Still not soup" on The Legal Genealogist, Judy G. Russell explains: [A]...


3

Unfortunately, all ethnicity calculators are not precise. So they can give absolutely different and unreliable results. For example, MyHeritage's ethnicity calculator gives for my mother British ancestry. It is completely wrong. She is Hungarian, so Balcanian and Central-european ancestry in results is OK. I can guess that such a result may be result of ...


3

If your Great-grandmother was 100% Spanish. Then your mother is 25% Spanish providing her grand-father (Your maternal great-grandfather) and father were 0% Spanish. If this is the case then, genetically speaking you are around 12.5% Spanish, providing that your father is also 0% Spanish. However you don't inherit exactly 12.5% from each great-grandparent. ...


2

DNA Testing (assuming you have done an autosomal test) gives you a broad idea of your DNAs ancient origins. The categories vary slightly company to company. It will never be 100% accurate as it is compared to samples of DNA found throughout the world. For example the part that says you are British just means you matched a certain part of your DNA that a high ...


2

There's no such thing as a "full-blooded African American". By definition, African American people have a mixed ethnic background with roots in African countries. Depending on how dark you are, you may have more or less African blood, but you will also certainly have European ancestry to as your ancestors who came to America as slaves would often have ...


2

It's simply because the testing companies test people in the US and Europe more than anywhere else. Also, if you're looking for matches in Israel, where the most Ashkenazi Jews live in the Middle East, you're kind of out of luck since it's illegal in Israel to do a genetic genealogy test. It's for privacy reasons, and even MyHeritage, which is based in ...


2

This is perhaps not the best place for the question, but I'll try my best. There are many questions in one here too. Firstly, I would question where you got the figure from, as sometimes DNA tests can get things wrong, even the big ones like Ancestry. As they don't look at the entire genome, only small slices of the genome known as "markers" their results ...


2

I don't like answering a question with a question but - how do you want to define ethnicity? Go back far enough and we are all, every single one of us, 100% African. Most people tend to refer to baseline their ethnicity a little closer than that! But even if you make an arbitrary choice of a specific, recent generation, the ethnicity might change on the ...


1

You have 50% of each of your parents' genes. They each have 50% of their parents' genes, and you have 25% of each of your grandparents' genes. You have 12.5% of each great-grandparents' genes. You have 6.25% of each great-great-grandparents' genes. So, if you are going solely off that one 100% Spanish great-great-grandfather, then your background is at least ...


1

You could try contacting an ex-pat organization like "The Sons of Norway" if you can. Since they often have maintaining culture as part of their mission, explaining recent naming conventions might be right up their alley.


1

The first DNA test looks as if it was for a male line. Did you test for a gender other than your own? The auDNA TEST gets both genders but not every cranny. National Geographic is anthropologically oriented, not Genealogically. I took several tests before I found the auDNA test. Costly mistakes. You can download a test's raw data through a gedcom or a ...


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