7

I maintain a Word document (over 260 pages now) that lists all of the events (births, deaths, marriages, etc.) of my direct ancestors in chronological order. As part of that document, I include all of the theories, guesses, and hypotheses associated with familial connections (possible but unproven relationships, lists of potential candidates for parents or ...


6

If you went around to researchers and asked them this question, I suspect you'd get a different answer for each one. Here are some of your options for recording genealogical information: paper systems designed for genealogy research, such as the forms in the workbook accompanying Emily Anne Croom's book Unpuzzling Your Past software made specifically for '...


5

I suggest that you start at our portal: https://gramps-project.org/wiki/index.php?title=Portal:Using_Gramps There's a lot to read over there, including suggestions on how to record data in various forms. On the subject of marriage, Gramps is not much different from other GEDCOM based software, in the sense that you can follow what I think is common. You ...


5

I believe that what you are looking for is software that will allow you to 'catalog' evidence claims made in sources and allow you to 'accumulate' evidence for a claim type and subject for analysis and help you formulate a proof argument to support your conclusions. If this is close to being on target, you must take a further look at Evidentia, which has ...


4

I've just left a long post on the other question mentioned already, What tools exist for collecting and managing evidence? Computer tools don't seem to exist for the kind of source management I want to do. In a paper-based system I can index any assertion in any source document I have, thus making it easy to pull out whatever source material I want to ...


4

For me, the only logical way to do genealogy is to record observations, be they statements from living people, or documents in a system. The software should then assist in creating assertions based on these observations and create an hypothetical family tree automatically from the assertions. It should all be driven by rules and probabilities. This is in ...


4

I googled "statistical genealogy" - in the expectation of no hits and found this question. LitvakSIG, the Lithuanian-Jewish research group (http://www.litvaksig.org), publishes data to paid-up contributors in the form of excel files: and this makes this sort of study straightforward for a particular locality. One can even do some sorts of longitudinal ...


4

To me the question of source centric-software is much larger than the example presented: "a marriage witnessed by a cousin - I know there is a cousin, but have no way to relate the individual without making some assumptions/guesses." Cases like that, or my favorite, the unidentified survivors (nieces, nephews, grandchildren and great-grandchildren) ...


4

It seems like the next step in utilizing the information from the will of John Francis in 1809 would be to locate the information related to this probate in the death duty registers which date from 1796 to 1903. These records should provide details about how the deceased persons effects were actually distributed and to whom. Additional information you could ...


4

@JanMurphy in her answer has nicely described the usefulness of source-centric software in a case like this. However, as the most widely used software is lineage-linked, you raise an important question. There is no right or wrong way to record uncertain information, but I think some approaches are better than others. In my lineage-linked database, my goal ...


4

It sounds like you need a way to manage your research before its confirmed enough that you want to enter it into your family tree software. Along with the other excellent software mentioned here, you might also explore ResearchTies: Share your sources on FamilySearch Tree with only a few mouse clicks, and/or create a PDF research log to be attached to ...


4

Handwriting analysis is a bit of an art. As a teenager, I picked up a book about it and it was fascinating. Certain types of people always cross their t's and dot their i's. Others, like athletes, write with big loops and long tails. If we are older or sick, the writing may be weak or shaky. But even so, the key thing is that one person will tend to write ...


3

As luck would have it, I stumbled on this discussion puzzling over the exact same signatures. I suspect the Ralphs are different, because the second Ralph is consistent in the way he signs his name. I am including another image from a different document that he also signed.


3

Applying the Genealogical Proof Standard (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genealogical_Proof_Standard) seems appropriate in cases like this. You have a relatively weak piece of evidence in the form of a small DNA match, and you have a possible explanation in the form of family trees which indicate a common ancestor. The first element of the standard, "...


3

This is actually a very interesting question, and I think there is a reasonably simple and acceptable way of handling fuzzy facts. My own genealogy adventure started many years ago with a similar set of stories from great-aunts and uncles about my ancestors. There was a tree which was handwritten by my father's aunt. And then there were many family tales ...


2

I currently use Evidentia (they are version 3 now) which has a gedcom export feature. I tested creating a tree from scratch in Rootsmagic and believe it is doable however the software not meant for creating a pedigree as you like. Knowing what I know and love about the program it's not loaded with bells and whistles to detract from your research. Interface ...


2

Autosomal DNA tests are very good at reliably identifying close relatives, i.e. those who are second cousins or closer. But they are not good at identifying more distant relatives where the match is made of smaller segments and the total cM of all segments is not very high. The reason is that once you get to a 3rd cousin, there starts to be a chance that ...


2

I'll go out a limb here and claim that no, it generally can't be used as evidence. Diahan Southard (among others) suggests that the probabilities for a 7 cM match are about 80% IBC, 20% IBD. To use such a match as evidence woud require overcoming those probabilities, somehow (I should note that it depends on where the match was observed as, e.g., Ancestry's ...


1

Personally I am sure that this doesn't answer the question but it seems important. Assume that the purpose of genealogy is to construct family relationships and potentially add further information about the lives of those people. As I understand the question, the two people have found sufficient evidence in "paper-based" sources that they have a ...


1

What a fascinating question and discussion. I don't believe that dirty data is an issue here. Any applied research has to deal with effects of data quality and genealogical data doesn't appear to be obviously special in its characteristics. One of my frustrations with the current genealogical tool sets is that they don't make it especially easy to, for ...


1

So far, I don't know how one makes the transition. The question is "How do you store evidence about persons, once you have reached the transition into record based genealogy,... Not to be too pedantic, but this portion of the question (from the OP) assumes that the person has already made the transition mentally. Most of the other answers are fine, but ...


1

I have a death cert of my gt grandfather's brother, John Caduggan, who died at Parsonage fach/bach , llanfair nant y gof.He died on 21st June 1857, aged 25 years.. an almsman, formerly a mason... Present at the death, and informant was WILLIAM JAMES, of trecoon mill, who is most probably a relation of your John James.


1

Any source of information can be considered evidence, however, some evidence is false and some is true. Ideally we are always looking for multiple independently derived sources written by persons who have direct knowledge of the claims being made. Also ideally, you would not enter a claim into your database unless you had at least one source of evidence. You ...


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