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2020 Update: For the content in this answer, assume that the user has an account with FamilySearch and has logged in to their account. 2017 Update: As of September 7, 2017, FamilySearch has discontinued distribution of microfilm. They are transitioning to digital records access. For the announcement on the transition, see the FamilySearch Newsroom ...


8

I'm not sure whether this works for all films, but when I check the catalog for church records of my home town here in The Netherlands, there is a message saying that the records are available on-line, as you can see here: https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/528701?availability=Family%20History%20Library When I follow the link at the end of the red ...


8

Your question "Why did my uncle's death certificate not appear in the Family History Library's archives?" contains several hidden assumptions. I'm going to make these explicit, not because I want to make an example of you, but because we ALL make these mistakes, and I hope this answer will be helpful to everyone. But the short answer to your question is ...


7

A friend has offered to take me along on her trips to the local FHC, which has prompted me to think about the question of how to make a general checklist to use while I am pulling and viewing microfilm. Reference works called registers e.g. Register of New York City death records describe the holdings at the FHL and the process needed to use them. If a user ...


6

It's best to have planned out areas of research given the resources you expect to find at your destination. For the Family History Library, you can do much planning using the online catalog of the FHL available on the FamilySearch.org site. Spending time beforehand looking for potentially relevant resources is time it won't be necessary to spend while at ...


6

In my humble opinion, I would bring a digital camera and a couple extra batteries. I would also carry a tape recorder, that way you can do dictation of your research. A notebook is also handy as well as a plentiful supply of sharpened pencils (that way you can erase if need be). Something that's rarely mentioned is "Thank You" cards. I always keep a ready ...


5

I do not know the answer to this. However, some of these points may be useful to prompt others: Any effective cross reference should not be from the film but from the collection(?) / batch(?) of source data. This is because a film could contain images of more than one type of record. I know several films at Chester are split - e.g. Church of England parish ...


5

Thomas Macentee has covered this topic at some length in a blog post A Trip To Bountiful Genealogy Research available from http://www.archives.com. Update: It is a lengthy and well-crafted piece of writing that deserves to be taken in full as the author intended.


5

As far as a Checklist or a Template would be concerned, I believe that would depend on the research plan you've conducted. To the best of my knowledge there isn't a checklist or a template so to speak that's provided by the LDS (Latter Day Saints) nor the (FHL) Family History Library. That being said, there is a Family History Consultants Guide (.pdf). ...


4

I'd suggest that you take a flash drive to "print" information from microfilm records instead of actually printing out copies.


3

Here is a list of tips before visiting the Family History Library. Not exactly a checklist, but it's helpful. It looks like you've done some explorations in the catalog on FamilySearch.org. The catalog does give a general description of the types of records in each film. Make sure you've done as much advance work as you can before you leave. It will be ...


1

It is OK to have different dates because really the several records may co-exist. For example, the birth certificate was issued in war time and lost and after the birth date was recorded from the words of person (and she/he could tell incorrect date). Also the errors constantly occur when volunteers try to convert scanned records into digital form because ...


1

Learning more about each source will help me narrow down exactly which rolls I need to search. Finding General information about the sources The Family History Wiki Article German Word List provides a basic list of German words and an English translation, so that the user can see B├╝rgerbuch is a citizen register. Searching the FamilySearch Wiki for the term &...


1

I was hoping to find more about the history of the different systems, but this page has a good overview of how to use the reference numbers at the bottom of the page to get back to the original source. Understanding the source information behind Historical Records results Citing Sources from the Legacy Collections at Historical Records For over 30 ...


1

I have never used these options, so can only speculate about their efficacy and offer this option as a last resort. a. Go to the opening page at www.familysearch.org b. Up in the right-hand corner, you will see "Get Help" - pick it. c. A small window will open up listing your choices. d. Choose an option or a few; see if they can provide you with a better ...


1

Here are some tips that I've gotten from J. Mark Lowe, F. Warren Bittner, Judy G. Russell, and Elizabeth Shown Mills that I'm trying to put into practice in my own research: Make a research plan. Yes, everyone says so, but Lowe breaks everything down and specifies what he wants to look for in meticulous detail. He puts all his tasks on individual index ...


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