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7

This article describes the incident: http://aircrewremembered.com/roy-arnold.html and leads me to search for "Oblt Walter Schneider" which comes up with another website or two. https://airpages.ru/eng/lw/fw190a1_1.shtml (Fw 190A-1, Werk Nr 027, "Yellow 1" of JG 26, of Oblt Walter Schneider in November 1941, which showed nineteen victory ...


6

Yes. The place however indicates the place of birth or sometimes the last residence before being drafted. The date should be the birth date.


5

There are a lot of things going on in this question. I'll try to untangle a few of them. First, the word "ben" is Hebrew for "son of" (see eg https://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/tombstones.html), not "of" or "from" as you say. For example, Joseph ben Jochanon Treves is a person named Joseph Treves whose father was ...


5

Yes. Mönchengladbach was called München-Gladbach (shortened to M.-Gladbach) between 1888 and 1929, then Gladbach-Rheydt, then München Gladbach without the hyphen, then Mönchen Gladbach. Only in 1960 did they switch to their current name. ( German source, Britannica also reports the old München-Gladbach name. )


3

This does not precisely answers your question, but I believe helps somehow (could not render it as a comment). I singled out in red the hebrew texts I could notice. Let's split them into 2 groups: to the left of the vertical double-line separator to the right of this same separator I believe the beginning of the text in group (1) denotes the date (year). ...


3

Church & Hospital Wikipedia lists the church as being built in 1927-1929. The page about the hospital says that from 1945-1954 the hospital was seized by the US army. Since the church has always been a hospital church I find it unlikely that it was used for regular weddings but it is not impossible. It could have been used for US ones, but I also find ...


3

Location You mention "Magdeburg Ackan" but this place does not exist so first we have to find out the most probable place for it. Fuzzy Gazetteer helps with that and comes up with "Aken". Indeed, Aken is near Magdeburg. So I assumed that Aken is meant. Next assumption is that he was of Lutheran denomination as this was the common ...


2

There is no such site. Please bear in mind that „Germany“ was a patchwork of more or less independent states for most of its history. Written records are scattered over archives in different places. A lot of records are lost for a variety of reasons, including war. You definitely need to focus your research efforts on specific individuals and then plan your ...


2

There is a local genealogy association: Verein für Familienforschung Lübeck They provide an excellent overview regarding genealogical resources related to Lübeck and offer help to researchers (please read their FAQ first).


2

If he was 7 in 1950, then due to data protection laws, the data may not be publicly available yet. If the chances are good that he was actually born in Hameln, try contacting the Standesamt in Hameln. There are online forms to request documents (of yourself or of ancestors): https://www.hameln.de/de/buergerservice-verwaltung/buergeranliegen/online-formulare/


2

You may be referring to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sidney_Godley: Originally it was thought that he had been killed, but some time later it was found that he was a prisoner of war in a camp called Delotz at Dallgow-Döberitz. It was in the camp that he was informed that he had been awarded the Victoria Cross. Godley left the camp in 1918 after the guards ...


2

In southern Austria I have not come across this wording yet. Might be something specific to Germany. An article in the Main Post titled "Ein Strohkranz als Zeichen der Schande" (A straw garland as sign of disgrace) from Schernau, Kitzingen (still Bavaria but not so far away from Thuringia) suggests that both @ColeValleyGirl and @Til Hund seem to ...


2

In the record it says Reihnprechting as you found out via the newspaper entry. There is a Reinprechting in Bavaria near Deggendorf (https://www.openstreetmap.org/node/1083604995). This might fit because the name "Reihnprechting" sounds either Bavarian or Austrian to me. Also the name "Muggenthaler" sounded Austrian to me, but would also ...


2

Since you're on Ancestry, you should look for the departure record in Bremen. That will give you another chance at deciphering the name (in another person's handwriting)


1

It is a noble cause to inform family members about the wartime captivity of their ancestors. However, it will be difficult. If none of the former prisoners later became a public figure, there will be hardly any publicly viewable information about them. Genealogical databases are not relevant in Germany for the period of interest. Civil status registers are ...


1

You can find a Census for 1855 on FamilySearch (39481) for - among others - Westensee and Neumünster available.


1

This is not a conclusive answer per se, but might aid as a lead to further investigate your German heritage. There is a (commercial) German website called Archion.de, also available in English, see link. There you can search for places like #Ballenstedt (not the # in front!). However, there are at the moment (in 2020) about half of the German church books ...


1

There was a Jewish community in Ballenstedt and it seems that it was shrinking over time. They had a synagoge build in 1791 and today there still is a Jewish cemetery there (but only 15 gravestones left). A quick overview over the history of the Jewish community in that town gives this page (German). I'm not an expert on Jewish records. GenWiki (German) ...


1

Church records for Hameln are available on Archion for Lutheran churches and on Matricula Online for the Roman-Catholic church. Don't expect an index for it. There is also an entry at GenWiki about Hameln (German) where you might find other resources or links to e.g. Genealogical Societies that could be of further help. I had a casual look at the linked ...


1

As a free, fairly quick, and dirty test, you could ask your Swiss contact whether he knows a couple of males, from both populations, who are happy for their genotyped Y-Chromosomes to be compared,to see if there’s any obvious common SNP combinations that identify / differentiates the two groups. Ancestry genotype approximately 1,700 YDNA SNPs, to determine, ...


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