9

I was in the same boat as you are about 10 years ago... There was barely anything on the internet, but persistence paid off and over the 10 years I have found sites here and there that have helped me get to where I am today. I started with just up to my great grandparents and today I have gone as far back as the 1500s! I actually came across this post as I ...


9

I've been putting off research in Ireland, because I haven't been able to get far back enough in the USA to make the leap across the water, so this answer will be based on search results more than experience. However, for Ireland especially, due to the great amount of record loss over time, I would follow the checklist I laid out in our question How can I ...


6

It sounds like you have a fascinating heritage in your grandmother's family. The best advice I can give is to start with what you know and work systematically back, step by step. Since you do not know your great grandmother's full name, the place you need to start is your grandmother's birth certificate. If I understand correctly your grandmother was born ...


6

My nephew has shown an interest in what I'm doing in genealogy. He asks via email how it is going and what new information I've found. That encourages me to continue. Even my youngest grandson asks how it's going & what I've learned (he's only 11!) & that encourages me. Also, in addition to ColeValleyGirl's great suggestions: If you have ...


4

The only way to trace your family history is to start with what you know and work from there. In some cases, if you don't know enough, there is no way you can get anywhere – but you can't know until you've tried. Presumably you know your son-in-law's name, but it sounds as though he has a very common surname, so that's not much help in narrowing things down....


4

I love all the suggestions so far, and would add the following: If your mother isn't good at computers and you are, join forces! She can gather material from non-online sources, and you can input it into your favorite genealogy software or online tree service for her. Ideally pick something that prints nice trees that she can look at. Along the way you can ...


4

Start by talking to every old person in your family. Write down everything they know. And talk to anyone who knew your grandparents. Pick a genealogy package and enter your family, and as much back history as you can. Record sources for everything you can, even if its just "Aunt Maria said grand-dad was born on May 15th". Then look at the https://...


3

A good starting point is often the FamilySearch Research Wiki page for the place you are interested in. In this case, the page for Malta genealogy has links to further information on civil registration in Malta with the appropriate contact addresses. The page also contains links to a variety of other sources of information that may be useful to you as you ...


1

4If born after 1863, then the civil Birth entry, with the parents names, and address should be available here:IrishGenealogy.ie, for Free. Similarly, if Protestant, or Jewish, their parents civil marriage will likely be on the site, and a sub-set of any Catholic Church marriages / baptisms, if periodically wanting a few graven images and a bit of coveting, ...


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