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7

Splatter, mentioned earlier by Jan Murphy, is now located at http://gigatrees.com/toolbox/splatter. It creates a distribution heatmap of all event locations for all persons found in your GEDCOM. It places markers on the map within a 50ft radius, which is dependent on how closely the place or address description found matches that found in the mapping ...


5

I think a map centric approach to visualizing the relationships between people, parcels and eras is the right way to go. The requirements that you describe are all possible using a Desktop GIS (Geographic Information System) or an Online GIS. The GIS platform with which I am most familiar is ArcGIS from Esri and so I would approach implementing an ...


5

There is a new feature in Family Historian 6, the Map Window, that may give you a display similar to what you want: Use the new Map Window to map the locations of all the places and events in your projects. View family movements over time, using the Time Slider. Choose any combination of people and events, and filter on event types, using the same ...


5

There has been some work on using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for family history and genealogy but it is crying out for more so I wish to encourage your efforts. For example, I just googled and found Mapping Your Ancestry with Google Maps. My own efforts so far have been based on using different GIS software: Examples of a Story Map Journal being ...


4

You're right that the hard part is finding the geographic locations of historical place names (and, working out incomplete and misspelled names). Places Do you have a link the LoC geonames api? The only Geonames api I'm aware of is at geonames.org, and there's also NGA geonames. Both are really limited to modern names. There's the FamilySearch Standard ...


4

As you mentioned in the question, you are interested in this for the purpose of inclusion of these events in a timetime. A timeline mechanism is actually the way most programs handle personless events. They simply associate a date with an event. It could be implemented within the program simply as one timeline where you put everything, or there can be ...


4

Your last paragraph about records just about answered your own question. As you say, county records and records with street addresses give you the county. Therefore, if you only have records that give you the town name for a person, then check the county records for each possible county for that person, or look in other records for a street address for ...


3

One software program that might be of help is called History Geo. I haven't used it myself but from my review of the software available, it appears to be closest to what you are looking for. They describe themselves as "a family history software service for linking old maps and land records to your genealogy research". Their data is based on Landowner maps. ...


3

Having commented, I probably should put my money where my mouth is and describe my solution - unfortunately for general applicability, as a UK based genealogist, I have only noticed one such place in my data, which is New York City. That's not to say that there aren't others that I haven't noticed. But for the sake of completeness.... While my normal format ...


3

You could also import your GEDCOM into the free Gramps genealogy software and use the Google Earth plugin. However, you probably need to run the Place completion tool first, so that your latitude and longitude information is added to your places.


3

As no answer has yet been attempted, I will give the disappointing results of my efforts to find this information - but still live in hope that someone can come up with a better solution! The bottom line is that information about sub-district extent does not seem to be publically accessible. The Office for National Statistics provide a number of resources ...


3

Take a look at Google Docs Fusion tables I know that several One-Name Studies are making use of them for mapping name distribution. This is a link to the Google info on Fusion tables. I haven't used them so just a suggestion on another piece of software to try.


2

I maintain my own geneaology site using PHPGedView (http://www.phpgedview.net/). This is an open source project that has very nice Google Maps integration.


2

I use MacFamilyTree on the Mac OSX and you have a variety of events types you can insert specifically into an individuals timeline as well as I believe create custom event types. You can ALSO edit the general World event timeline to include important events at your pleasure or remove individual ones that come by default. When you then print or display ...


2

On problem with this is that most software doesn't have a hierarchy of places. As such an event that happened in Russia, would not show up for somebody in Moscow, Russia. This is as far as I can tell also true for GRAMPS, but with that Caveat, then you can in GRAMPS create events that has a location attached. I don't know of any way to get those events to ...


2

Google Earth has a lot of useful features and lots of third party applications. When I first started looking at land use history I converted PDF plats into transparent GIF overlays and pinned them into GE. Scale and orientation can be challenging, but if you have metes and bounds the Plat Plotter online application can create an overlay. Plat Plotter can ...


2

I have a Windows C# program that plots events from a GEDCOM file on google maps and presents them in a timeline. It geocodes using the google maps API. I use to plot my exported Family Tree data. This runs under Windows 7 or higher, using NET framework. I know this an old post, but if anyone is interested, I would be happy to email it.


2

It sounds as though the question is: when a city crosses county lines, which county should one choose as for the "standard" place name for that city? If so, I think (and as @Ikessler implies), you probably shouldn't, for the reasons already given, but rather use the county with the corresponding record repository. Possibly the most extreme example is New ...


2

Since I now live and work in England I do not know all that much about modern American records. Given that I also very rarely work on records which are less than a hundred years old and are far more like to be two, three or four hundred years old. That being said I do however have a detailed background in researching English families in the British Isles and ...


2

I have to add my twopennyworth here for public viewing. One of my research difficulties, when making a case for whether two named people are the same or different, is the lack of appropriate information about administrative and ecclesiastic divisions, and even streets in a town or city. Let me explain: administrative regions would have names and boundaries ...


1

I'd agree with you about staying away from migration analysis. It seems like a really good idea, but you'd have to find a very large dataset in order to discover anything interesting. I tried doing this with FamilySearch's database a few years ago and came up empty. (You may have better luck than I did though.) Maybe you could get the Geni database. It's ...


1

You might be able to find something about your specific individuals by name (what is sometimes called "a lucky dip") but I suggest you are better off looking for general information about the individual railroads, since you already have the company names. One possible starting point: Mike Good's website Railroad Research Sources on the Internet. I found ...


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