10

Annoying...! I think the word is "Indep", meaning "Independent", as in "Of Independent means". "I" and "J" do seem to be very similar in many hands and I'm not sure what to say the difference is. I've just looked through this census book and can't see any other use of a capital "I", and of course found several "J" for "Jane", etc., that look very similar. ...


6

An address would only be shown in column 5 (mother's name) when the mother's usual address at the time of the birth is different to that shown as the place of birth. So you would read that she was working as a servant at 10 St James Parade and probably only went to the workhouse infirmary to give birth (being the only medical provision available to her at ...


6

A good place to start researching workhouses is workhouses.org.uk. They have a page about Bristol Workhouse. Bristol actually maintained two workhouses: The Clifton Union workhouse at 100 Fishponds Road, Eastville Stapleton Workhouse The records of the Clifton Union Workhouse are held by Bristol Archives. Unfortunately, the details on your certificate ...


4

First of all - these are pdf images of the entries in the records at GRO. They are not images of the original registers so the handwriting on them is not really relevant to any enquiry. You are correct that a birth must be registered in the district in which it took place (although there is provision to give the information elsewhere, known as "by ...


4

Have you tried FreeREG this lists all the PR's that they have currently transcribed and also has links to other sites that may have what you are looking for. Also the Forebears site has lots of alternative links to try. Also yesterday Ancestry released a load of Gloucestershire PR's on their site. As they are so new have you checked these yet?


3

The September 2015 issue of the Society of Genealogists' Magazine (p420) notes missing burials in Sussex, in the early 1800s. The problem originated from the Priest completing the register once a year from the parish clerk's account book. The problem was that no entry was made into the account book if the fee had been paid in full already. The account book ...


3

A couple of suggestions for you in the local area that may narrow down your search: Gloucestershire county archives are largely kept at the archive office in Gloucester. Almondsbury nowadays is pretty much just a suburb of Bristol, which has its own archives. These include local cremation records, which may help if your Granddad was cremated in a Bristol ...


2

William Chichester of Dymock was a landowner and farmer (not a Judge) with two farms which he ran and also sub let to his nephew. I have a copy of his will and the court case that arose as a consequence. As an aside, I have a complete and detailed family history for the Chichesters of Somerset going back to 1620 etc which will answer most of the ...


1

Going through your list of unusual things about this record: Mrs Elizabeth Courtnay 'Mrs' did not refer to a married woman in the 1730s. It was a title of status. In her journal article titled Mistresses and marriage: or, a short history of the Mrs, Amy Erickson puts it nicely: Today the most common use of the word 'mistress' is in its abbreviated ...


1

This answer does not address the main part of the question about whether the marriage is in some way unusual in the wording of its record. However, I am posting it to try and shed light on whether the marriage record could "give credence to my theory that the John Chichester who married in 1732 at Horton could be the same John Chichester who baptised a son ...


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