10

The technique you are looking for is off-camera flash. This means a separate flash unit that you can trigger remotely (usually wirelessly, nowadays). By directing the light across the stone at an angle, even shallow inscriptions are highlighted. The results are amazing. I see and read details that I couldn't see standing there in person. The improvement is ...


10

PolyGeo's answer is correct that the names in parentheses are nicknames. It is quite common to include nicknames in either parentheses or quotation marks, and usually it is more clear than this particular case that those names are nicknames. Betty's obituary can be found in the Winnipeg Free Press in 2010, which states she was: Fondly known as Boozy ...


6

I think the most likely reason for the name in brackets to be considered important enough to place on their headstone would be that it represents the name that they used between them and/or amongst their friends and family. I think that they are both nicknames. Perhaps Betty enjoyed a drink, and people thought Hymie was too long to always say in full. ...


6

One of the difficulties with Find a Grave is that it takes information of varying quality and throws it all into one huge pot, with little transparency about where the information came from. It is possible to evaluate each memorial to see how are reliable it might be, but the website itself doesn't make it easy. Like many of the materials we use for ...


6

Findagrave is a collaborative site. Memorial profiles are created, managed and improved by site users using a multitude of resources: grave photos cemetery records cemetery transcripts and surveys obituaries vital records family trees Some memorial managers verify and keep track of information sources, some don't. Some site practises don't match what one ...


6

Looks more like a ribbon with words on it than a snake. The circle surrounding, is vaguely like a Celtic knot, so the ribbon could be a snake/serpent after all as the bottom of the ribbon looks like a head with an eye. Have a look at this link [ I agree with the words Transcribed by @ColeValleyGirl ] Carried to the Almighty Lord


5

After guessing a few words of the — is proverb the right word for it? — I was able to find it via google on two other entries in findagrave.com, this one and this one. The complete inscription is very close to BERTHA M. Bertha M. Frau von Wife of JOHN SHRADER John ...


5

A search of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission grave locator for service members from WW2 who served with the Lancashire Fusiliers with a rank of Corporal yields 103 records. If your granddad is in the database, having his military service number would help you distinguish his entry from another service member with the same name. Do you have any ...


5

Ask for cemetery information at local historical societies, genealogical societies, and local libraries. Ask to see what they may have stashed away that they never look at or have cataloged. I found my G3GF's lot after it had been deemed "lost" by a search team in the 1920s. The management office had no name cross-references for 1,000s of burials prior to ...


4

Burial records at the local churches may be helpful for identifying the who and when of the graves. Death records and obituaries, if accessible/available, will also be helpful. If your cemetery is on the list of Provost Municipal District cemeteries at "Alberta: CanadaGenWeb's Cemetery Project", then the Alberta Genealogical Society may have some ...


4

This does read like a gravestone epitaph, especially the line from the hymn "Come unto Me and rest". There are a few resources for the Isle of Wight that would be my first ports of call. The Isle of Wight FHS website contains two databases that are potentially useful in your case: Monumental Inscriptions Index: The coverage page says that inscriptions for ...


4

FindAGrave lists a considerable number of persons named Maria Correia in various graveyards in Rhode Island (as well as in other states). I would be wary of an identification based solely on first and last name and year of birth. However, together with the other evidence provided in the edits to the original question the identity of the women in the grave ...


3

There is no magic answer for you. You'll have to do research and detective work to find your great-grandfather. It does look like your ancestors on that line are Jewish. Here's some ideas: Locate Israel and Louis Shrager's graves. On Jewish headstones they usually give in Hebrew the person's first name ben (son of) their father's first name. This may allow ...


3

The tombstone and newspaper appear correct. Newspapers don't publish obits a year late. Detroit Free Press Detroit, Michigan Sunday, January 20, 1889 - Page 5 I presume the FS entry to be an error. It is a return of deaths ending in Dec 1888, but was not created until April 20th 1889. So the newspaper (and probably the tombstone) are the earlier records. ...


3

One way to identify groups that may have enjoyed success in this area would be to look at the reported outcomes of government programs offering funding support. The (former) Queensland Community Memorials Restoration was described as follows The scope of activity also includes cemetery reclamation and preservation projects, and assistance for local ...


3

Here's what I was able to read so far (original, and translation): Bertha M. Frau von John Shrader Gest. Mai 17, 1885 im Alter von 34 Jahr 6 Mon. und 28 Tage Im ... ... geliebt Amale Tochter von ... ... M. Shrader Gest. Mai 14, 1885 Im Alter von 4 Tagen Bertha M. Wife of John Shrader died May 17, 1885 aged 34 years, 6 months, 28 days ... Amale Daughter of J....


2

When dealing with online databases, especially where the record creator or indexer may have been unfamiliar with the correct spelling of a surname, sometimes it is worth searching just on first name and some other known characteristics alone. A possibility for Maria L. Correia, for example, might be this record. It gives her name as "Marie Lucinda Careau", ...


2

I think some stones were lost when a large tree toppled down several years ago. I'm not sure of the exact date but it was in this century (21st). The tree was felled by a severe down draft that caused it to splinter and topple which destroyed several graves stones. I suspect the stones of an ancestral uncle and his family were among those destroyed as I had ...


2

Once you have the weeds out of the way, you can often take a legible photo of a stone that appears too worn to read using off-camera flash. See this question and answer including some before and after photos. You might also get such a photo using lucky sun position or the mirror method, but off-camera flash gives you much more control, and you don't have ...


2

I shared the question during the Twitter Chat #AncestryHour and received some suggestions, although some may not be useful on a white or pale stone: ScottishIndexes has had some success using tinfoil: see this post on their Facebook page blogger Liz Loveland of Adventures in Genealogy cautioned against using flour to make the inscription more visible, and ...


2

I'm not sure this fully answers your question but I think it is relevant, and far too much to place in the comments. I'm not sure if you already have any or all of this, but I came across a second individual with a very similar name - Ebzebeda Millman (of course, the spelling varies). She was the daughter of William and Catherine Millman, born in Cornwall ...


2

The first line says: "Here lies" 2nd and 3rd lines are: "Schmuel, son of Zev" 4th line says: "died on the 4th intermediate day of Sukkot 697". So the 4th line simply gives the date of death in Hebrew. You add 5000 to the 697 to give the Hebrew year 5697. The Hebrew date is the equivalent of Oct 6, 1936, so there is no new ...


1

This is not a complete answer to your question but may provide another data point for you to consider. It is one where the same phrase is used and where the birth date seems to be known. My 3rd great grandfather Thomas Hitchcox was baptised on the impossible date of 29 Feb 1797 at Lapley, Staffordshire, England. On 3 Feb 1873 at Fullarton, South Australia,...


1

Hephziba Millman was my 2nd great grandmother. I have found her with many given name variations, including some of those above. Illiteracy and the unusual name if spoken unclearly are, as suggested above, probably the reason for the variations. Out of interest I searched the web for "Hephziba". One result said that according to the Old Testament, 2 Kings ...


1

I would ask both the cemetery and the family for permission. Find a Grave posted pictures of my family members, in particular a brother and sister, and when my mom discovered this, it brought up a lot of grief and sadness and the painful reminder that they are not with us. As far as I know it is legal because it is open to the public, but out of ...


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